Wüsthof Knife Question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Denise~*, Mar 9, 2005.

  1. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    OK, I'm taking the plunge & buying new knives. I'm trying to decide
    between 2 different Wüsthof sets. I'm not quite sure what the deal is
    with these & I can't decide.

    Both of these have been discounted to the same cost so purchase amount
    would be the same, but one was originally almost $60.00 more than the
    other and comes with less "stuff". Doesn't make sense. I'm not an
    expert on knives, so maybe Y'all could help me out here. What makes the
    smaller set more valuable than the larger set?

    Here was the "lesser" expensive set

    Wüsthof Traditional Gourmet 7-Piece Block Set

    # Full, seamlessly encased triple-riveted tangs; synthetic
    traditional-style handles
    # Includes 4-inch parer, 4-1/2-inch utility, 8-inch carver, 8-inch chef's
    # Also: shears, 9-inch sharpening steel, 9-slot oak block
    # Laser-cut high-carbon steel blade with stain-resistant alloy
    # Precise tapering from grinding and polishing procedure

    Product Description

    Review
    Representing Wüsthof’s Gourmet series of knives, this block set features
    less expensive versions of the knives in the manufacturer’s Classic
    series. Knives in the set include a 4-inch parer, 4-1/2-inch serrated
    utility, 8-inch chef's, kitchen shears, and 9-inch sharpening steel.
    Everything fits within the 9-slot rubber-footed oak block. Although the
    blades are still made of high-carbon steel with a stain-resistant alloy,
    the difference in the Gourmet series is that the blade is a thinner
    quality metal and is cut by a precision laser instead of by hand. The
    blade still has an ideal shape as it is ground and polished by computer
    to ensure perfect tapering from tip to bolster. Full tangs extend
    through the synthetic traditional-style handles, which are
    triple-riveted for strength. These knives are dishwasher-safe but
    handwashing is recommended to preserve the edges on the blades. The
    Gourmet series is an excellent alternative for those who want to own
    quality Wüsthof cutlery but are on a budget.

    What's in the Box
    4-inch parer; 4-1/2-inch utility; 8-inch carver; 8-inch chef's; shears;
    9-inch sharpening steel; 9-slot oak block

    Product Description
    Wusthof has been make knives in Germany for over 190 years. The fine
    high carbon no stain steel retains its edge for a long time and is easy
    to sharpen. Gourmet is a laser cut blade. The full tang 3 rivited handle
    is sturdy and well balanced. The 7pc set includes, 4" parer, 4.5"
    utility serrated, 8"carver, 8"cooks, kitchen shear, 9"sharpening steel,
    9 slot oak block

    Here is the "more" expensive set

    Wüsthof Grand Prix 5-Piece Knife Block Set

    # Full tangs; molded polypropylene handles; lifetime warranty
    # Knives include: 6-inch cook's, 8-inch carving, 3-inch paring
    # Also includes: 9-inch sharpening steel; 9-slot oak block
    # Blades formed of single piece of high-carbon, stain-resistant steel
    # Computer-ground, hand-honed blades; precision slicing; longer edge
    retention

    Review
    This set includes an assortment of short-blade cutlery designed for
    chefs with smaller hands. These specialty knives are difficult to find
    packaged together. The set contains: a 6-inch cook’s knife--a staple for
    chopping meats and vegetables; an 8-inch carving knife for slicing
    steaks and roasts; and a 3-inch paring knife for slicing garlic or
    peeling fruit. The 9-inch honing steel has a magnetic steel shaft in a
    fine to medium grit that sharpens without damaging knife edges. A 9-slot
    oak block stores the cutlery in this set, while leaving room for
    additional pieces.

    Wüsthof’s Grand Prix knives have the perfect balance of high-carbon,
    no-stain steel. Knives retain their edge longer, and never become
    discolored. Blades are ground and polished by computer, ensuring perfect
    tapering from bolster to tip. Edges are hand-honed for precision
    slicing. The tang extends through a slip-free, molded, polypropylene
    handle for excellent balance and heft. The knives are
    dishwasher-safe--though hand washing is recommended. All Wüsthof cutlery
    is covered under a lifetime warranty. --Cristina Vaamonde
    What’s in the Box
    6-inch cook’s knife, 8-inch carving knife, 3-inch paring knife, 9-inch
    sharpening steel, 9-slot oak block.

    Product Description
    This five-piece cutlery collection from the Wüsthof Grand Prix line
    outfits your kitchen with everything you need to slice, dice, and chop
    all your favorite foods. The set includes a 3-inch paring knife for
    peeling fruits and vegetables, a 6-inch utility knife for slicing
    mushrooms and mincing garlic, a 6-inch cook's knife for all-purpose
    chopping and slicing, a 9-inch sharpening steel, and a nine-slot wooden
    storage block. Each knife features a precision-forged high-carbon
    stainless-steel blade with a full bolster and tang. The forging process
    gives the blades remarkable sharpness and durability, as does the
    computer-controlled grinding and polishing process. When the blades
    eventually dull, as all blades do, the sharpening steel will re-hone the
    edges with a few quick swipes.

    The handles are comfortable in the hands thanks to the slip-free,
    pebble-grained grip. Each handle also enhances the balance of the knife
    thanks to the full tang and single-piece construction, making them
    easier to manipulate and control. Wüsthof recommends hand washing the
    cutlery--which comes with a limited lifetime warranty--for best results.

    What's in the Box
    3-inch paring knife, 6-inch utility knife, 6-inch cook's knife, 9-inch
    sharpening steel, wooden storage block

    Product Description
    Wusthof has been making the finest knives in the world for over 190
    years. Through excellent craftsman ship and engineering the Grand Prix
    knife line has become one of the finest in the world. This 5 piece set
    includes 3-inch parer, 8-inch carving, 6-inch cooks, 9-inch steel and a
    9-slot storage block.
     
    Tags:


  2. aem

    aem Guest

    Denise~* wrote:
    > OK, I'm taking the plunge & buying new knives. I'm trying to decide
    > between 2 different Wüsthof sets. [snip]


    First question is why buy a set? What knife or knives do you need? As
    with pots and pans many of us find that buying individual pieces gives
    us a better chance of meeting our specific needs.

    > Both of these have been discounted to the same cost so purchase
    > amount would be the same, but one was originally almost $60.00
    > more than the other [snip]


    Why does it matter what the former prices were? That's not an
    indication of quality or how they will fit with your needs.
    >
    > Here was the "lesser" expensive set
    >
    > Wüsthof Traditional Gourmet 7-Piece Block Set
    >
    > # Full, seamlessly encased triple-riveted tangs; synthetic
    > traditional-style handles
    > # Includes 4-inch parer, 4-1/2-inch utility, 8-inch carver, 8-inch

    chef's
    > # Also: shears, 9-inch sharpening steel, 9-slot oak block
    > # Laser-cut high-carbon steel blade with stain-resistant alloy
    > # Precise tapering from grinding and polishing procedure
    >
    > [snip]
    >
    > Here is the "more" expensive set
    >
    > Wüsthof Grand Prix 5-Piece Knife Block Set
    >
    > # Full tangs; molded polypropylene handles; lifetime warranty
    > # Knives include: 6-inch cook's, 8-inch carving, 3-inch paring
    > # Also includes: 9-inch sharpening steel; 9-slot oak block
    > # Blades formed of single piece of high-carbon, stain-resistant steel
    > # Computer-ground, hand-honed blades; precision slicing; longer edge
    > retention

    [snip]
    Okay, so it's 3 knives, one of which is a 6" cook's, versus 4 knives,
    one of which is an 8" cook's, plus shears. The smaller set has
    traditional (but synthetic) handles, the larger set molded polyprop.
    The larger set has laser-cut blades, the smaller has ground, hand-honed
    blades.

    If it were me, I'd have to go to the store and try them out for how
    they feel in my hand. Some knifes just fit, and others don't. If it
    doesn't feel right, nothing else matters. This is even true for my
    Chinese cleavers.

    Quality and longevity of both will be outstanding because they're
    Wusthof. In terms of knife-making technology you'd have to think that
    the ground and honed blades have the potential for greater sharpness.
    But both will be plenty sharp enough, and both will require good care
    to maintain it. So it comes down to, what do you need and do they feel
    good in your hand.

    Personally, a 6" cook's knife is too small for me, I much prefer the 8"
    size. And I've never had a serrated utility knife, that might be
    useful. So I'd go with the larger set, but that's me, not you.

    -aem
     
  3. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest


    > First question is why buy a set? What knife or knives do you need? As
    > with pots and pans many of us find that buying individual pieces gives
    > us a better chance of meeting our specific needs.


    I do pretty much need to replace most of my knifes, and I thought a set
    would accomplish this. Plus the cost for the set is right in my budget,
    -vs- just buying one Wusthof knife will kill my budget. I like that
    there are more slots in the block, than knifes that come with the set,
    this way I can put a couple of my old favorites in the other slots.

    > Why does it matter what the former prices were? That's not an
    > indication of quality or how they will fit with your needs.


    I have pretty much no clue about knife lingo, this is why I was
    wondering. Youactually answered this question below about the knife blades.

    > Okay, so it's 3 knives, one of which is a 6" cook's, versus 4 knives,
    > one of which is an 8" cook's, plus shears. The smaller set has
    > traditional (but synthetic) handles, the larger set molded polyprop.
    > The larger set has laser-cut blades, the smaller has ground, hand-honed
    > blades.


    I actually have a 3 stage electric knife sharpener that I purchased
    about a year ago. Does anyone know if one of these blade "styles" works
    better with an electric sharpener?

    > If it were me, I'd have to go to the store and try them out for how
    > they feel in my hand. Some knifes just fit, and others don't. If it
    > doesn't feel right, nothing else matters. This is even true for my
    > Chinese cleavers.


    I know, but the handles look pretty standard. I don't really have much
    difficulty with different shaped handles, with the exception of too
    small & they dont really look small. I'll take my chances.

    > Quality and longevity of both will be outstanding because they're
    > Wusthof. In terms of knife-making technology you'd have to think that
    > the ground and honed blades have the potential for greater sharpness.
    > But both will be plenty sharp enough, and both will require good care
    > to maintain it. So it comes down to, what do you need and do they feel
    > good in your hand.
    >
    > Personally, a 6" cook's knife is too small for me, I much prefer the 8"
    > size. And I've never had a serrated utility knife, that might be
    > useful.


    Good points

    > So I'd go with the larger set, but that's me, not you.
    > -aem


    Thanks for the help.
     
  4. Maverick

    Maverick Guest

    "Denise~*" <denise@nexuscomputing.com> wrote in message
    news:MrmdnThZtqBez7LfRVn-iQ@wavecable.com...
    >
    >
    >> First question is why buy a set? What knife or knives do you need? As
    >> with pots and pans many of us find that buying individual pieces gives
    >> us a better chance of meeting our specific needs.

    >
    > I do pretty much need to replace most of my knifes, and I thought a set
    > would accomplish this. Plus the cost for the set is right in my
    > budget, -vs- just buying one Wusthof knife will kill my budget. I like
    > that there are more slots in the block, than knifes that come with the
    > set, this way I can put a couple of my old favorites in the other slots.
    >
    >> Why does it matter what the former prices were? That's not an
    >> indication of quality or how they will fit with your needs.

    >
    > I have pretty much no clue about knife lingo, this is why I was wondering.
    > Youactually answered this question below about the knife blades.
    >
    >> Okay, so it's 3 knives, one of which is a 6" cook's, versus 4 knives,
    >> one of which is an 8" cook's, plus shears. The smaller set has
    >> traditional (but synthetic) handles, the larger set molded polyprop.
    >> The larger set has laser-cut blades, the smaller has ground, hand-honed
    >> blades.

    >
    > I actually have a 3 stage electric knife sharpener that I purchased about
    > a year ago. Does anyone know if one of these blade "styles" works better
    > with an electric sharpener?


    I wouldn't recommend using it on your Wusthof knives. When you buy high
    quality knives, you should think about having them sharpened by an expert.
    I purchased the Wusthof Classic set almost a year ago. I still can't get
    over how well they perform compared to the piece of crap knives I was using
    so I won't be using an electric knife sharpener. I'll have them
    professionally done.

    >> If it were me, I'd have to go to the store and try them out for how
    >> they feel in my hand. Some knifes just fit, and others don't. If it
    >> doesn't feel right, nothing else matters. This is even true for my
    >> Chinese cleavers.

    >
    > I know, but the handles look pretty standard. I don't really have much
    > difficulty with different shaped handles, with the exception of too small
    > & they dont really look small. I'll take my chances.
    >
    >> Quality and longevity of both will be outstanding because they're
    >> Wusthof. In terms of knife-making technology you'd have to think that
    >> the ground and honed blades have the potential for greater sharpness.
    >> But both will be plenty sharp enough, and both will require good care
    >> to maintain it. So it comes down to, what do you need and do they feel
    >> good in your hand.
    >>
    >> Personally, a 6" cook's knife is too small for me, I much prefer the 8"
    >> size. And I've never had a serrated utility knife, that might be
    >> useful.


    The 8" knife fits my hand perfectly but my wife is tiny and the 8" is too
    much for her. She has given me permission to buy her a Wusthof 6" chef's
    knife. Like I was reluctant to do so. Kind of like when she "made" me
    purchase a digital camcorder before Christmas. Yeah, real arm twister
    there! ;->

    > Good points
    >
    >> So I'd go with the larger set, but that's me, not you.
    >> -aem

    >
    > Thanks for the help.


    Wusthof is a pretty big investment when you consider that you are buy knives
    but since I bought my set, I think it was one of the better investments I've
    ever made.

    Bret



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  5. Steve B.

    Steve B. Guest

    The Gran Prix are far superior to the Gourmet line. The former has
    forged blades and the latter has stamped blades.

    Steve
    Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    Tools by Steve Bottorff
    Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com


    Denise~* wrote:
    >
    > OK, I'm taking the plunge & buying new knives. I'm trying to decide
    > between 2 different Wüsthof sets. I'm not quite sure what the deal is
    > with these & I can't decide.
    >
    > Both of these have been discounted to the same cost so purchase amount
    > would be the same, but one was originally almost $60.00 more than the
    > other and comes with less "stuff". Doesn't make sense. I'm not an
    > expert on knives, so maybe Y'all could help me out here. What makes the
    > smaller set more valuable than the larger set?
    >
    > Here was the "lesser" expensive set
    >
    > Wüsthof Traditional Gourmet 7-Piece Block Set
    >
    > # Full, seamlessly encased triple-riveted tangs; synthetic
    > traditional-style handles
    > # Includes 4-inch parer, 4-1/2-inch utility, 8-inch carver, 8-inch chef's
    > # Also: shears, 9-inch sharpening steel, 9-slot oak block
    > # Laser-cut high-carbon steel blade with stain-resistant alloy
    > # Precise tapering from grinding and polishing procedure
    >
    > Product Description
    >
    > Review
    > Representing Wüsthof’s Gourmet series of knives, this block set features
    > less expensive versions of the knives in the manufacturer’s Classic
    > series. Knives in the set include a 4-inch parer, 4-1/2-inch serrated
    > utility, 8-inch chef's, kitchen shears, and 9-inch sharpening steel.
    > Everything fits within the 9-slot rubber-footed oak block. Although the
    > blades are still made of high-carbon steel with a stain-resistant alloy,
    > the difference in the Gourmet series is that the blade is a thinner
    > quality metal and is cut by a precision laser instead of by hand. The
    > blade still has an ideal shape as it is ground and polished by computer
    > to ensure perfect tapering from tip to bolster. Full tangs extend
    > through the synthetic traditional-style handles, which are
    > triple-riveted for strength. These knives are dishwasher-safe but
    > handwashing is recommended to preserve the edges on the blades. The
    > Gourmet series is an excellent alternative for those who want to own
    > quality Wüsthof cutlery but are on a budget.
    >
    > What's in the Box
    > 4-inch parer; 4-1/2-inch utility; 8-inch carver; 8-inch chef's; shears;
    > 9-inch sharpening steel; 9-slot oak block
    >
    > Product Description
    > Wusthof has been make knives in Germany for over 190 years. The fine
    > high carbon no stain steel retains its edge for a long time and is easy
    > to sharpen. Gourmet is a laser cut blade. The full tang 3 rivited handle
    > is sturdy and well balanced. The 7pc set includes, 4" parer, 4.5"
    > utility serrated, 8"carver, 8"cooks, kitchen shear, 9"sharpening steel,
    > 9 slot oak block
    >
    > Here is the "more" expensive set
    >
    > Wüsthof Grand Prix 5-Piece Knife Block Set
    >
    > # Full tangs; molded polypropylene handles; lifetime warranty
    > # Knives include: 6-inch cook's, 8-inch carving, 3-inch paring
    > # Also includes: 9-inch sharpening steel; 9-slot oak block
    > # Blades formed of single piece of high-carbon, stain-resistant steel
    > # Computer-ground, hand-honed blades; precision slicing; longer edge
    > retention
    >
    > Review
    > This set includes an assortment of short-blade cutlery designed for
    > chefs with smaller hands. These specialty knives are difficult to find
    > packaged together. The set contains: a 6-inch cook’s knife--a staple for
    > chopping meats and vegetables; an 8-inch carving knife for slicing
    > steaks and roasts; and a 3-inch paring knife for slicing garlic or
    > peeling fruit. The 9-inch honing steel has a magnetic steel shaft in a
    > fine to medium grit that sharpens without damaging knife edges. A 9-slot
    > oak block stores the cutlery in this set, while leaving room for
    > additional pieces.
    >
    > Wüsthof’s Grand Prix knives have the perfect balance of high-carbon,
    > no-stain steel. Knives retain their edge longer, and never become
    > discolored. Blades are ground and polished by computer, ensuring perfect
    > tapering from bolster to tip. Edges are hand-honed for precision
    > slicing. The tang extends through a slip-free, molded, polypropylene
    > handle for excellent balance and heft. The knives are
    > dishwasher-safe--though hand washing is recommended. All Wüsthof cutlery
    > is covered under a lifetime warranty. --Cristina Vaamonde
    > What’s in the Box
    > 6-inch cook’s knife, 8-inch carving knife, 3-inch paring knife, 9-inch
    > sharpening steel, 9-slot oak block.
    >
    > Product Description
    > This five-piece cutlery collection from the Wüsthof Grand Prix line
    > outfits your kitchen with everything you need to slice, dice, and chop
    > all your favorite foods. The set includes a 3-inch paring knife for
    > peeling fruits and vegetables, a 6-inch utility knife for slicing
    > mushrooms and mincing garlic, a 6-inch cook's knife for all-purpose
    > chopping and slicing, a 9-inch sharpening steel, and a nine-slot wooden
    > storage block. Each knife features a precision-forged high-carbon
    > stainless-steel blade with a full bolster and tang. The forging process
    > gives the blades remarkable sharpness and durability, as does the
    > computer-controlled grinding and polishing process. When the blades
    > eventually dull, as all blades do, the sharpening steel will re-hone the
    > edges with a few quick swipes.
    >
    > The handles are comfortable in the hands thanks to the slip-free,
    > pebble-grained grip. Each handle also enhances the balance of the knife
    > thanks to the full tang and single-piece construction, making them
    > easier to manipulate and control. Wüsthof recommends hand washing the
    > cutlery--which comes with a limited lifetime warranty--for best results.
    >
    > What's in the Box
    > 3-inch paring knife, 6-inch utility knife, 6-inch cook's knife, 9-inch
    > sharpening steel, wooden storage block
    >
    > Product Description
    > Wusthof has been making the finest knives in the world for over 190
    > years. Through excellent craftsman ship and engineering the Grand Prix
    > knife line has become one of the finest in the world. This 5 piece set
    > includes 3-inch parer, 8-inch carving, 6-inch cooks, 9-inch steel and a
    > 9-slot storage block.
     
  6. Old post on the taxonomy of wusthof knives:

    http://tinyurl.com/3p59y

    The Grand Prix have better blades, being forged, than the Gourmet are.
    Essentially, the Grand Prix is the Classic with a different handle.

    The Grand Prix use the less-expensive plastic molded handles, which
    some people think are more comfortable than the squared handles of
    the Classic, though some people think the squared handles are more
    maneuverable.

    The Gourmet models use a much cheaper, stamped blade,
    and they lack the bolster (the metal finger-guard between
    the handle and blade), so they are overall much cheaper
    and lighter.

    The Gourmet do have rivets in the handle, which you may
    prefer the look of. And it is the squared-off shape
    of the Classic handle.

    The discount on the Grand Prix set you're looking at is
    a very good deal, but, as you noted, you're only getting
    three knives, where the Gourmet set adds a utility knife
    and a set of shears.

    So it's a question of quality vs. functionality, and as the
    prices are identical, it's up to you.

    --Blair
    "Do supply and demand proud."
     
  7. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Blair P. Houghton wrote:
    > Old post on the taxonomy of wusthof knives:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/3p59y
    >
    > The Grand Prix have better blades, being forged, than the Gourmet

    are.
    > Essentially, the Grand Prix is the Classic with a different handle.
    >
    > The Grand Prix use the less-expensive plastic molded handles, which
    > some people think are more comfortable than the squared handles of
    > the Classic, though some people think the squared handles are more
    > maneuverable.
    >
    > The Gourmet models use a much cheaper, stamped blade,
    > and they lack the bolster (the metal finger-guard between
    > the handle and blade), so they are overall much cheaper
    > and lighter.
    >
    > The Gourmet do have rivets in the handle, which you may
    > prefer the look of. And it is the squared-off shape
    > of the Classic handle.
    >
    > The discount on the Grand Prix set you're looking at is
    > a very good deal, but, as you noted, you're only getting
    > three knives, where the Gourmet set adds a utility knife
    > and a set of shears.
    >
    > So it's a question of quality vs. functionality, and as the
    > prices are identical, it's up to you.


    I'd go with fewer but better quality knives, you can always add later
    as budget permits... and I have a kitchen shears sitting in a drawer
    for at least 40 years, never used for shearing, not even once... but it
    does have bottle cap opening capability that does get occasional use,
    but a pair of slip joint pliers works just as well. For general
    kitchen work all anyone really needs is just four knives; a chefs
    knife, a paring knife, a boning knife, and a bread knife.

    Sheldon
     
  8. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    Blair P. Houghton wrote:

    snip

    > So it's a question of quality vs. functionality, and as the
    > prices are identical, it's up to you.
    >
    > --Blair
    > "Do supply and demand proud."



    Thank you so much for posting this. I believe I have made my decision
    now, base on yours & Steve B's responses
    I alrealy have two kitchen shears, so I'm no so sure if I need another,
    since I don't really use them that often anyhow, and I know it comes
    with a Untility knife, but I have tons of serrated knives that I use all
    the time, I use them everday as a matter of fact just for the purpose of
    cutting grapes & other fruits for my 2.7 year old. I'm just not so sure
    if it's that important to me to have another one.

    I much prefer a better blade than a cheaper one. Thanks!
     
  9. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    Steve B. wrote:

    > The Gran Prix are far superior to the Gourmet line. The former has
    > forged blades and the latter has stamped blades.
    >
    > Steve
    > Sharpening Made Easy: A Primer on Sharpening Knives and Other Edged
    > Tools by Steve Bottorff
    > Copyright January 2002 Knife World Publications
    > www.sharpeningmadeeasy.com
    >


    Thanks! I think I'll take a look at your site too.
     
  10. On 10 Mar 2005 17:30:25 -0800, "Sheldon" <PENMART01@aol.com> wrote:
    >Blair P. Houghton wrote:

    <snip>

    >I'd go with fewer but better quality knives, you can always add later
    >as budget permits... and I have a kitchen shears sitting in a drawer
    >for at least 40 years, never used for shearing, not even once... but it
    >does have bottle cap opening capability that does get occasional use,
    >but a pair of slip joint pliers works just as well. For general
    >kitchen work all anyone really needs is just four knives; a chefs
    >knife, a paring knife, a boning knife, and a bread knife.


    I'm with Sheldon on this one.

    I currently have four knives in my block:

    An 8" Cuisine de France Commercial Sabatier, high carbon stainless
    steel chef's knife with a moulded handle, _my_ knife. Was $110.00 Cdn
    at time of purchase.

    A 8" Lagostina Pro-force stainless steel chef's knife with a riveted
    handle, the _guest_ knife. Was $75.00 Cdn at time of purchase

    A generic bread knife, 50 cents at a garage sale.

    A Farberware Pro stainless steel paring knife, about $17.00 Cdn at
    time of purchase.

    I still have to get a boning knife, but it isn't high priority, as I
    don't do much deboning.

    Shirley Hicks
    Toronto, Ontario
     
  11. Kswck

    Kswck Guest

    <snip>

    > I'd go with fewer but better quality knives, you can always add later
    > as budget permits... and I have a kitchen shears sitting in a drawer
    > for at least 40 years, never used for shearing, not even once... but it
    > does have bottle cap opening capability that does get occasional use,
    > but a pair of slip joint pliers works just as well. For general
    > kitchen work all anyone really needs is just four knives; a chefs
    > knife, a paring knife, a boning knife, and a bread knife.
    >
    > Sheldon
    >


    How about a nice long slicing knife?
     
  12. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Kswck wrote:
    > <snip>
    >
    > > I'd go with fewer but better quality knives, you can always add

    later
    > > as budget permits... and I have a kitchen shears sitting in a

    drawer
    > > for at least 40 years, never used for shearing, not even once...

    but it
    > > does have bottle cap opening capability that does get occasional

    use,
    > > but a pair of slip joint pliers works just as well. For general
    > > kitchen work all anyone really needs is just four knives; a chefs
    > > knife, a paring knife, a boning knife, and a bread knife.
    > >
    > > Sheldon
    > >

    >
    > How about a nice long slicing knife?


    "long" is not a measurement, and "nice" is the dumbest word ever
    created.

    Very few people need to slice anything at home that can't be easily
    handled with their chefs knife... I can't remember the last time I
    served a steamboat roast. I have all sorts of slicers/tranchards but I
    prefer to use an 8" chefs knife to slice all roasts, including 25lb
    holiday turkeys. When dollars are no object by all means buy out the
    cutlery shop... but for those on a tight budget, all anyone really
    needs is the four aforementioned knives... and most folks can do
    without a boning knife, for home use a quality 3 1/2" parer will do the
    occasional deboning job just fine... I use an 8" chefs knife to
    disjoint and debone poultry all the time

    Sheldon
     
  13. LIke one poster above said, don't buy a set! Take your time and
    acquire individual pieces for your hand and favorite uses. I started
    with an equal number of Wusthof and Henckels. Now any additions are
    Henckels. I prefer them, better balanced, usually on sale for a
    greater percentage discount (keep checking Cooking.com, many on sale
    right now), and they take a home sharpening better.
    ..
    Other pieces I have are Chicago Cutlery and Ace Hardware (really).
     
  14. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    j-lattie@neiu.edu wrote:
    > LIke one poster above said, don't buy a set! Take your time and
    > acquire individual pieces for your hand and favorite uses. I started
    > with an equal number of Wusthof and Henckels. Now any additions are
    > Henckels. I prefer them, better balanced, usually on sale for a
    > greater percentage discount (keep checking Cooking.com, many on sale
    > right now), and they take a home sharpening better.
    > .
    > Other pieces I have are Chicago Cutlery and Ace Hardware (really).



    Well the set I have decided to buy is cheaper than 1 Wusthof knive, and
    with the set I'll get 3 knifes, a new block & sharpening tool, so
    really I think this is a good buy. The block has 9 slots, so I can add
    more pieces at any time, or keep some of my old favorites. :)
     
  15. Marc Wolfe

    Marc Wolfe Guest

    "Sheldon" <PENMART01@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:1110593890.965541.91460@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
    >
    > Kswck wrote:
    >> <snip>
    >>

    [snip to restore attributions]
    >> How about a nice long slicing knife?

    >
    > "long" is not a measurement, and "nice" is the dumbest word ever
    > created.
    >
    > Very few people need to slice anything at home that can't be easily
    > handled with their chefs knife... I can't remember the last time I
    > served a steamboat roast. I have all sorts of slicers/tranchards but I


    Tranchelards. ;-)

    I otherwise agree with Sheldon's assessment. I purchased a Messermeister
    10" slicer with the granton edge. It gets used 2-3 time a year, and then
    only as part of the presentation when we're having guests.

    Maitre d' knives are more for show than anything else.

    Marc
     

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