wax chain lube

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by ilaboo, Dec 16, 2007.

  1. ilaboo

    ilaboo Guest

    useless in the winter especially for locks!!--screwed up my kryptonite

    nothing other than a tornadoe stops me from riding my bike--will from now on
    make my own lube ( 4oz paint thinner --one teaspoonful of candle wax--not
    gobs like the one i bought

    take care

    peter
     
    Tags:


  2. Michael

    Michael Guest

    ilaboo wrote:
    >
    > useless in the winter especially for locks!!--screwed up my kryptonite
    >
    > nothing other than a tornadoe stops me from riding my bike--will from now on
    > make my own lube ( 4oz paint thinner --one teaspoonful of candle wax--not
    > gobs like the one i bought
    >
    > take care
    >
    > peter



    You put wax in a lock? Dude! What were you thinking?!
    Never put oil or grease or (shudder) wax in locks; use graphite.
     
  3. Hmmmmmm....Candle wax????? Only thing that I have seen happen to wax
    in the winter is that it gets brittle in the cold. Perhaps you live
    someplace that has extremely mild winters. I certainly would NOT be
    using that mixture here in Nebraska. MUCH too cold here. And, yes, I
    do ride on a daily basis too. Stick to graphite or simply go to the
    trouble of cleaning your chain every two to three days if the sand and
    salt get to be too much.


    On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 15:47:57 GMT, Michael <NoSpam@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    >
    >ilaboo wrote:
    >>
    >> useless in the winter especially for locks!!--screwed up my kryptonite
    >>
    >> nothing other than a tornadoe stops me from riding my bike--will from now on
    >> make my own lube ( 4oz paint thinner --one teaspoonful of candle wax--not
    >> gobs like the one i bought
    >>
    >> take care
    >>
    >> peter

    >
    >
    >You put wax in a lock? Dude! What were you thinking?!
    >Never put oil or grease or (shudder) wax in locks; use graphite.
     
  4. ilaboo

    ilaboo Guest

    harry

    yes candle wac
    what i go for is a very thinn coating--lasts maybe 2 or 3 hundred miles--i
    bike in every kind of weather except tornadoes

    take care
    peter
    "Harry (Lincoln, Nebraska)" <hbrogan57@NOSPAM.yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:eek:n8dm357m14eqrn8opo5msbri52mak5pfd@4ax.com...
    > Hmmmmmm....Candle wax????? Only thing that I have seen happen to wax
    > in the winter is that it gets brittle in the cold. Perhaps you live
    > someplace that has extremely mild winters. I certainly would NOT be
    > using that mixture here in Nebraska. MUCH too cold here. And, yes, I
    > do ride on a daily basis too. Stick to graphite or simply go to the
    > trouble of cleaning your chain every two to three days if the sand and
    > salt get to be too much.
    >
    >
    > On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 15:47:57 GMT, Michael <NoSpam@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >>ilaboo wrote:
    >>>
    >>> useless in the winter especially for locks!!--screwed up my kryptonite
    >>>
    >>> nothing other than a tornadoe stops me from riding my bike--will from
    >>> now on
    >>> make my own lube ( 4oz paint thinner --one teaspoonful of candle
    >>> wax--not
    >>> gobs like the one i bought
    >>>
    >>> take care
    >>>
    >>> peter

    >>
    >>
    >>You put wax in a lock? Dude! What were you thinking?!
    >>Never put oil or grease or (shudder) wax in locks; use graphite.

    >
     
  5. On Dec 17, 4:48 pm, "ilaboo" <plen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > harry
    >
    > yes candle wac


    You might find canning parafin preferable to candle wax, which has
    stearic acid added. Google might be willing to help ya, if ya ask
    nice.


    > what i go for is a very thinn coating--lasts maybe 2 or 3 hundred miles--i
    > bike in every kind of weather except tornadoes
    >
    > take care
    > peter
    > "Harry (Lincoln, Nebraska)" <hbroga...@NOSPAM.yahoo.com> wrote in messagenews:eek:n8dm357m14eqrn8opo5msbri52mak5pfd@4ax.com...
    >
    > > Hmmmmmm....Candle wax????? Only thing that I have seen happen to wax
    > > in the winter is that it gets brittle in the cold. Perhaps you live
    > > someplace that has extremely mild winters. I certainly would NOT be
    > > using that mixture here in Nebraska. MUCH too cold here. And, yes, I
    > > do ride on a daily basis too. Stick to graphite or simply go to the
    > > trouble of cleaning your chain every two to three days if the sand and
    > > salt get to be too much.

    >
    > > On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 15:47:57 GMT, Michael <NoS...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > >>ilaboo wrote:

    >
    > >>> useless in the winter especially for locks!!--screwed up my kryptonite

    >
    > >>> nothing other than a tornadoe stops me from riding my bike--will from
    > >>> now on
    > >>> make my own lube ( 4oz paint thinner --one teaspoonful of candle
    > >>> wax--not
    > >>> gobs like the one i bought

    >
    > >>> take care

    >
    > >>> peter

    >
    > >>You put wax in a lock? Dude! What were you thinking?!
    > >>Never put oil or grease or (shudder) wax in locks; use graphite.
     
  6. Hmmmm.......Parafin....now THAT'S an idea. I think I'll be looking
    into that one. With all the sand and salt on the roads around here
    right now I have found myself cleaning my chain and gears every other
    day to keep the grit out.

    Don't know if the parafin would help that or make it worse but it's
    certainly worth checking into.

    On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 15:06:42 -0800 (PST), Ozark Bicycle
    <bicycleatelier@ozarkbicycleservice.com> wrote:

    >On Dec 17, 4:48 pm, "ilaboo" <plen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> harry
    >>
    >> yes candle wac

    >
    >You might find canning parafin preferable to candle wax, which has
    >stearic acid added. Google might be willing to help ya, if ya ask
    >nice.
    >
    >
    >> what i go for is a very thinn coating--lasts maybe 2 or 3 hundred miles--i
    >> bike in every kind of weather except tornadoes
    >>
    >> take care
    >> peter
    >> "Harry (Lincoln, Nebraska)" <hbroga...@NOSPAM.yahoo.com> wrote in messagenews:eek:n8dm357m14eqrn8opo5msbri52mak5pfd@4ax.com...
    >>
    >> > Hmmmmmm....Candle wax????? Only thing that I have seen happen to wax
    >> > in the winter is that it gets brittle in the cold. Perhaps you live
    >> > someplace that has extremely mild winters. I certainly would NOT be
    >> > using that mixture here in Nebraska. MUCH too cold here. And, yes, I
    >> > do ride on a daily basis too. Stick to graphite or simply go to the
    >> > trouble of cleaning your chain every two to three days if the sand and
    >> > salt get to be too much.

    >>
    >> > On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 15:47:57 GMT, Michael <NoS...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >>
    >> >>ilaboo wrote:

    >>
    >> >>> useless in the winter especially for locks!!--screwed up my kryptonite

    >>
    >> >>> nothing other than a tornadoe stops me from riding my bike--will from
    >> >>> now on
    >> >>> make my own lube ( 4oz paint thinner --one teaspoonful of candle
    >> >>> wax--not
    >> >>> gobs like the one i bought

    >>
    >> >>> take care

    >>
    >> >>> peter

    >>
    >> >>You put wax in a lock? Dude! What were you thinking?!
    >> >>Never put oil or grease or (shudder) wax in locks; use graphite.
     
  7. On Dec 17, 4:38 pm, "Harry (Lincoln, Nebraska)"
    <hbroga...@NOSPAM.yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Hmmmm.......Parafin....now THAT'S an idea. I think I'll be looking
    > into that one. With all the sand and salt on the roads around here
    > right now I have found myself cleaning my chain and gears every other
    > day to keep the grit out.
    >
    > Don't know if the parafin would help that or make it worse but it's
    > certainly worth checking into.


    It's been a LONG time since I lived in a place with winters, but ....
    I'm curious whether my usual routine wouldn't serve you just as well:

    I use a 50/50 mixture of odorless mineral spirits and Mobil1 synthetic
    oil.

    For cleaning, I use a wadded up rag and a can of WD-40 with the straw
    (you get the idea). Clean first. Let dry. Apply the 50/50 mix (I
    use a toothbrush to minimize waste). Do this AFTER the ride to allow
    evaporation of the mineral spirits.

    For me, I go a couple hundred miles between chain maintenance, but ...
    you may want to do it more regularly. I get a LOT of miles out of my
    drivetrain. Lots of other factors come into play, to be sure, but....

    For me, the whole concept of waxing the chain is a dramatically messed
    up cost/benefit equation.

    Of course, YMMV.

    Ride safely,
    Neil
     
  8. Why after the ride???? Here in Lincoln, Nebraska I need all the
    protection I can get. Not only do they sand and salt the streets but
    they also put it on most of the marked bike routes. This is a good
    thing to keep them clear but it can wreak havoc with chains and gears.

    I actually came home one day and noticed that, after the snow had
    melted off, my chain already ahd that "rust" color to it. That's why
    I clean it about every other day. Depending on how much I ride of
    course.

    Would there be a problem with using the synthetic alone I wonder? Or
    is there a reason for the mineral spirits?


    On Mon, 17 Dec 2007 16:44:32 -0800 (PST), neil0502@yahoo.com wrote:

    >On Dec 17, 4:38 pm, "Harry (Lincoln, Nebraska)"
    ><hbroga...@NOSPAM.yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> Hmmmm.......Parafin....now THAT'S an idea. I think I'll be looking
    >> into that one. With all the sand and salt on the roads around here
    >> right now I have found myself cleaning my chain and gears every other
    >> day to keep the grit out.
    >>
    >> Don't know if the parafin would help that or make it worse but it's
    >> certainly worth checking into.

    >
    >It's been a LONG time since I lived in a place with winters, but ....
    >I'm curious whether my usual routine wouldn't serve you just as well:
    >
    >I use a 50/50 mixture of odorless mineral spirits and Mobil1 synthetic
    >oil.
    >
    >For cleaning, I use a wadded up rag and a can of WD-40 with the straw
    >(you get the idea). Clean first. Let dry. Apply the 50/50 mix (I
    >use a toothbrush to minimize waste). Do this AFTER the ride to allow
    >evaporation of the mineral spirits.
    >
    >For me, I go a couple hundred miles between chain maintenance, but ...
    >you may want to do it more regularly. I get a LOT of miles out of my
    >drivetrain. Lots of other factors come into play, to be sure, but....
    >
    >For me, the whole concept of waxing the chain is a dramatically messed
    >up cost/benefit equation.
    >
    >Of course, YMMV.
    >
    >Ride safely,
    >Neil
     
  9. On Dec 17, 5:25 pm, "Harry (Lincoln, Nebraska)"
    <hbroga...@NOSPAM.yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Why after the ride????


    The mineral spirits are a thinner, allowing the Mobil1 to get into the
    pivots, rollers, and ... well ... whatever those other bits and pieces
    are that you actually /need/ the lubrication ;-)

    The goal, though, is to leave the lubricant behind, so you want to
    leave ample time for the (very volatile) mineral spirits to
    evaporate. Overnight is probably more than enough, and it's pretty
    convenient.

    > Here in Lincoln, Nebraska I need all the
    > protection I can get. Not only do they sand and salt the streets but
    > they also put it on most of the marked bike routes. This is a good
    > thing to keep them clear but it can wreak havoc with chains and gears.
    >
    > I actually came home one day and noticed that, after the snow had
    > melted off, my chain already ahd that "rust" color to it. That's why
    > I clean it about every other day. Depending on how much I ride of
    > course.
    >
    > Would there be a problem with using the synthetic alone I wonder? Or
    > is there a reason for the mineral spirits?


    See above. People have their opinions about the proportions of the
    mix. I probably use too much mineral spirits (others talk about 3
    parts Mobil1 to 1 part spirits), but ... it seem to work fairly well
    for me.

    WD-40 -- aside from displacing water quite well (WD = "Water
    Displacement"), helps to free rusty parts. It's a pretty good
    corrosion inhibitor, but, then, so is the Mobil1 that the mix leaves
    behind.
     
  10. ilaboo

    ilaboo Guest

    you could also sue 100% acetone--buy it in beauty supply--i push a safety
    pin thru the bottle close to the neck--that way it becomes a squeeze
    bottle--leave the pin in after use--remember it is extremely flammable--
    other thing to use is spray carburator cleaner--some leave a very thing film
    of lubricant. im not sure that bike chains need a thick oil film--gets
    grimey especially when taking wheels off


    hth

    peter
    <neil0502@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:bc03cad3-2a58-4196-b500-6e2fc10b5c76@b1g2000pra.googlegroups.com...
    > On Dec 17, 5:25 pm, "Harry (Lincoln, Nebraska)"
    > <hbroga...@NOSPAM.yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> Why after the ride????

    >
    > The mineral spirits are a thinner, allowing the Mobil1 to get into the
    > pivots, rollers, and ... well ... whatever those other bits and pieces
    > are that you actually /need/ the lubrication ;-)
    >
    > The goal, though, is to leave the lubricant behind, so you want to
    > leave ample time for the (very volatile) mineral spirits to
    > evaporate. Overnight is probably more than enough, and it's pretty
    > convenient.
    >
    >> Here in Lincoln, Nebraska I need all the
    >> protection I can get. Not only do they sand and salt the streets but
    >> they also put it on most of the marked bike routes. This is a good
    >> thing to keep them clear but it can wreak havoc with chains and gears.
    >>
    >> I actually came home one day and noticed that, after the snow had
    >> melted off, my chain already ahd that "rust" color to it. That's why
    >> I clean it about every other day. Depending on how much I ride of
    >> course.
    >>
    >> Would there be a problem with using the synthetic alone I wonder? Or
    >> is there a reason for the mineral spirits?

    >
    > See above. People have their opinions about the proportions of the
    > mix. I probably use too much mineral spirits (others talk about 3
    > parts Mobil1 to 1 part spirits), but ... it seem to work fairly well
    > for me.
    >
    > WD-40 -- aside from displacing water quite well (WD = "Water
    > Displacement"), helps to free rusty parts. It's a pretty good
    > corrosion inhibitor, but, then, so is the Mobil1 that the mix leaves
    > behind.
     
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