What pedals and shoes should i buy for road cyling?( cheap please)?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by adrienne224, Sep 19, 2017.

  1. adrienne224

    adrienne224 New Member

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    And can anyone tell me where I can find a pair of shoes with pedals that come with them. Or can anyone tell me what shoes I should buy for a road bike and what pedals would go with it.
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    there are road-style pedals and MTB-style pedals.
    MTB-style have smaller cleats that can be recessed into the soles.
    This means you can walk pretty good in MTB shoes.
    The downside - according to some - is that they don't distribute the load over the foot as well.
    I've never felt it as a problem. Good MTB shoes are stiff enough that it isn't an issue for me.
    Road-style have a far bigger cleat. Walking is awkward. Power transfer supposedly better.
    IMO its perfectly OK to do road riding in MTB shoes, at least on a fitness/recreational level.
    A MTB shoe CAN'T take a road cleat.
    SOME road shoes are drilled for both cleat sizes.
    As a new rider, you're not missing much - If anything - by starting with MTB.
    Once you've decided between road/MTB, go shop for a shoe that fits your feet AND has the preferred drilling.
    Fit really is your top priority. Nothing else matters If you can't wear the shoes.
    When you found shoes, go shop for pedals.
    If you buy them new they will come with the appropriate cleats.
    Assemble and ride.
    One rookie mistake is not to mount the cleats well enough. And a slipping cleat can be real hard to unclip. Use of threadlock is advisable.

    If you want cheap, you're probably better off looking at MTB stuff.
    Wellgo do decent pedals.
     
  3. GuitarRider2002

    GuitarRider2002 New Member

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    Pretty much everything dabac has just said.

    I prefer MTB pedals and cleats, I like being able to walk around easily and being able to clip in on BOTH sides is really nice. Lots of good options for cheap MTB pedals too. The Shimano M520 is indestructible, and dirt cheap.

    Some brands that have cheaper shoes include Shimano, Pearl Izumi and Nashbar, but there are plenty of there for less than 50 bucks.

    Turn the tension WAY down on the pedals when you first get them, and practice clipping in and out while leaning against something on the bike. It really doesn't take long to learn at all, I can't believe I was so scared of going clipless, I can't imagine riding flat pedals now.
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Seconding and third'ing dabac's advice.

    1. Decide if you want to use a road or mountainbike (shimoNO road pedals and cleats are generally referred to as SPD-SL while thier mountain bike system is just called SPD) or road shoe-pedal-cleat system. Road cleats are said to provide greater foot stability on the pedal, may offer more adjustment range (debatable) ans 'can' be more comfortable.

    2. Buy a shoe that is comfortable. The shoe must fit you well and not cause pain or you will be tossing it in the trash quickly.

    3. Do not be afraid to adjust your cleat position so that you have no knee or foot discomfort / pain. As dabac stated. Loctite or some other semi-permanent thread locking compound is recommended.

    4. And as GR2002 advised...if your new pedals have adjustable release tension, turn it down for starting out and familiarizing yourself with how clipless systems feel and function.

    5. Stick a set of hex key wrenches in your pocket. Adjust your cleats, tighten or re-tighten your cleats as required and increase the release tension as your confidence and experience un-clipping dictates.
     
  5. cyclintom

    cyclintom Active Member

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    While good advice this appears to miss Adrienne's point doesn't it?

    If you're looking for cheap and convenient the Shimano 520 SpD pedals are the ones to use.

    For shoes: the harder the soles the less problems you will encounter with hot foot.

    However, the harder/stiffer the sole the more important fit is and the more expensive the shoe is.

    If your idea of a long ride is 25 miles or less, then buying the soft soled tennis shoe type of shoe is the cheapest way to go. Also the shoe laces generally spread the load on the foot more evenly so that precise fit is less of a problem.

    There are other pedals made by other manufacturers that can use the two-bolt mounting system but usually they are harder to find and very often more expensive.
     
  6. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I can only recommend that you go down to your LBS and have a pair fitted to you, trying to buy shoes via the internet will be a real pain, but a properly experienced bike shop will have measurement devices to make sure you get the right shoe for your feet. I can't recommend any brands since again depending on your feet will determine what shoe is going to be best for you.

    While stiffer is better in a shoe the problem is that as the stiffness ratio go goes up so does the price of the shoe, so you'll have to compromise on stiffness if you want an inexpensive shoe.

    Pedal wise you haven't told us if you are using the bike for commuting or training. Shimano makes some really nice pedals in the 105 model, however if you are commuting then Shimano makes a pedal called the PD M324, another good pedal to look at if you want something cheaper than the 105 is the Look Keo Classic 3 but not so much for commuting purposes but can be.

    Whatever shoe/pedal you get you have to make sure the combination will work together, this is where a good LBS can be extremely helpful.
     
  7. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT Active Member

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    MTB style SPD pedals are easier to use IMHO than road type SPD-SL pedals. The shoes are also much easier to walk in because you can recess the cleat in the tread and it is steel so it won't wear out so easily.

    Bike Nashbar used to sell an inexpensive SPD copy pedal and cleat. Those worked pretty well.
     
  8. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I agree if a person will be riding and want to walk while on a ride a MTB set up is idea. I have MTB pedals (Speedplay Frog's) on my main road bike, and use SPD (SIDI) shoes and they're great for how I like ride.
     
  9. GuitarRider2002

    GuitarRider2002 New Member

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    I stopped seeing the cheap Nashbar M520 copy cats, they called them "VP Components". $13 bucks for a pair shipped was pretty amazing for what they are. I did however, notice significant bearing wear after 1,100 miles but for 13 bucks who cares! A person can score M520s for less than $30 shipped easily though. If Nashbar sells anymore of the knock offs I'm going to pick up a couple of pair just for back ups or for my hybrid bike that I don't ride much.
     
  10. adrienne224

    adrienne224 New Member

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  11. cyclintom

    cyclintom Active Member

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    Stay away from MTB SpD knockoffs. They do not have the adjustments designed properly and since new riders will inevitably try to turn the clip-in pressure down they unscrew from the mechanism and it's almost impossible to get them back together again.
     
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