What seat post do i need for a brooks saddle

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by bike_seat_throwaway, Oct 29, 2017.

  1. bike_seat_throwaway

    bike_seat_throwaway New Member

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    I just bought a Brooks C17 saddle for my entry-level road bike. But I can't get it set so that it doesn't have a rather uncomfortable upward tilt upward. I'm assuming that the Brooks saddle isn't compatible with this seat tube. But if that's the case, what kind of seat tube do I need?

    I realize from Googling this issue that some people like to have their saddles tilted upward. But this is too much to be comfortable.
     


  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Brooks saddles have horizontal rails. I've never seen a seat post that would not adjust the clamp(s) to a horizontal position. Take a picture of your saddle and seatpost, please.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    My guess from your comments is that your entry level roadbike has an entry level seat post "CLAMP".

    I hate that type of clamp. It's a rocker type set up with grooves in it so you can only adjust to the points where the grooves are set up with the one big bolt under the seat.

    I ditched mine and invested in "micro adjust" seat posts.

    This has two bolts for the adjustment. You tighten one, loosen one, or both, any combination that allows you to make a fine tune of the position.

    Micro adjustments being able to place the saddle tilt in any position rather than those you are limited to with the grooves in the one bolt seat post system.

    Can be pricey. I got one for $80 (Thomson) then I got another from a local shop that happened to have one removed from a bike of which a customer wanted replaced. $20. Both work just as well!


    Notches where red lines are. Limit your movements to designated positions. SUCK!

    Capture1.JPG
    GOOD seat post. Turn one, both, or whatever you feel like doing to get exact tilt positions!


    Capture2.JPG
     
  4. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Btw, some seat posts have set back and some don't.

    So if you want to get a more forward position on the bike, closer to the handlebars,like the second image.

    Set back is curved or set back behind the pedals so that you are sitting , behind the pedals. Usually the posts you see with a curve aiming backward like the first image.

    I have zero setback posts on both my roadbikes. Never had a problem though some may say it could be a problem. Never specified what they were talking about or showed images of any kind of issues or damage. Whatever! I have been using them for years with no issues.
     
  5. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I would suggest since you are a newbie, is to go down to your local bike shop with your seat post, better yet with the bike, different bikes use different diameter posts so if you buy a new one it has to fit, and you have to get the right setback.

    HOWEVER, the clamping style that Mr Beanz is talking about is this:

    [​IMG]

    notice the nut, take the nut off and next part next to the nut is this semi round clamp, those just come off leaving you with the part that has the groove, the seat post attaches to that but it does take some hand force (do not use a tool) to spread the rails on the saddle far enough to snap over the grooved part, just put one rail into the one of the grooves then use the hand force to get the rail to spread over and snap into position. Replace the semi round part and nut of course and your done.

    If you still can't get the seat on, then you need to bend the C clamp in just a tad then try putting the seat on again.

    You can do all of this without leaving the clamp device on the post, when you get the saddle connected then put the clamp device with the seat now attached and slip it over the seat post and tighten. It may be a bit tough to put the clamp over the seat post if you had to bend to C clamp a tad but you can worm it back on. This whole process will require some physical labor because sometimes it can be quite a chore but it will work.

    I use to have kids bikes I had to replace saddles with, and they all had this crappy clamping system but any seat will fit on it.

    Getting a new seat post is the way to go ideally but if you want to save money you don't have to.
     
  6. Mr. Beanz

    Mr. Beanz Well-Known Member

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    Nope, that's not the design I referred to in my post.

    The design I refer to is the seat post that one vertical bolt design. Small carriage type that sits on the rocker type fixture of the seat post interlocking the grooves with one another. One can only seat the carriage according to the grooves on the rocker type carriage limiting the adjustments to where ever the grooves are.

    So you for instance, not exact but an example, set the saddle at a 5 degree tilt, the next groove may only allow an 8 degree angle.

    The micro adjust 2 bolt system I suggest would allow you to reach 5,6,7, 8 and so on.

    Lousy artist but this is the one bolt grooved system I mention, that sucks!:D

    000clamp.jpg
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW ...

    While Micro-Adjust seatposts may be better than the typical "rocker" cradle, they are not perfect ... particularly for use with a Brooks saddle whose rails beg you to set them horizontally ...

    In addition to the small number of choices, you will find that if you get one to use with your Brooks saddle that you will probably need to find a longer, substitute bolt for the rear adjuster.​

    Not all Micro-Adjust seatposts have a zero setback ... so, consider your saddle's fore/aft positioning before you get one because the rails on the Brooks saddles do NOT allow for as much aft positioning (which may-or-may-not be your choice).​

    Here is a Brooks saddle mounted on a (now-vintage) Campagnolo seatpost ...

    OLMO_seatpost.jpg
    Here is a Brooks saddle mounted on a zero-setback Micro-Adjust seastpost ...

    RALEIGH_7z13d.jpg
    BTW. Your bike's seat tube angle may-or-may-not be a factor in determining the amount of cradle setback you want a Micro-Adjust seatpost to have ...

    In the second instance with the zero-setback post, the seat tube angle is a comparatively slack 72º vs. in the other example where the seat tube angle is 73º ...
     
  8. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    I've never in over 40 years of being around bikes I have never seen that type of seat bolt system. So I turned the internet to find out where those came from, apparently they are found on BMX bikes...which I have never been around those type of bikes.
     
  9. Shrely

    Shrely New Member

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    I would suggest you can buy the same model match your bike from Amazon or go your local bike shop with your seat post.
     
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