why do restaurant steaks have "that taste"?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by dakota2112, Dec 29, 2004.

  1. dakota2112

    dakota2112 Guest

    I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    answer.

    Let me explain. Firstly, I'm very picky about my steaks. In fact, I
    very rarely order a steak at a restaurant, because frankly they never
    hold a candle to the steaks I grill at home. Of course I'm not talking
    about what some people consider "real" steakhouses, I'm talking about
    the standard places like Outback, Lone Star, et al.

    I grill my steaks in a very particular way, with the end result being a
    charred outside and VERY pink & juicy inside, and I prefer my grilled
    steaks over the aforementioned restaurant steaks hands down in just
    about every category (doneness, juiciness, consistency, overall taste,
    etc). I can go into more detail about how I cook my steaks if
    necessary, but to save space, I'll hold off for now.

    HOWEVER...

    The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a restaurant
    steak to have "that taste"? I hope you know what I'm talking about.
    There is some particular kind of flavor that is present in almost any
    restaurant steak, regardless of where you get it or how you ordered it.
    It even has its own aroma. I will admit, I like that aspect of
    restaurant steaks. But unfortunately, it almost always comes down to a
    great aroma and that great initial taste, followed by the meat turning
    into a chewy, tasteless wad of rubber once you begin to chew.

    I'd like to add "that taste" to my grilled steak at home, since "that
    taste" is the one and only thing that's missing. I've tried, but I
    cannot reproduce it. I've used a hot cast iron skillet, I've tried
    numerous seasonings, liquid smoke, etc, and none of it produces that
    restaurant flavor. Some people say you have to use meat from a
    butcher, but I say noway, because those restaurant steaks having "that
    taste" usually have very poor texture and consistency. If butcher meat
    yields "that taste" + poor texture and consistency, then I'd rather
    continue with what I use (typically custom cut at Krogers, 1.5-2.0"
    thick). Other people say you have to cook it using methods ABC, or
    XYZ, or ABX, or AYZ, or XBC, or some other very subjective combination.

    Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    Thanks in advance!
     
    Tags:


  2. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "dakota2112" <dakota2112@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:1104356984.172960.107990@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    > answer.
    >
    > Let me explain. Firstly, I'm very picky about my steaks. In fact, I
    > very rarely order a steak at a restaurant, because frankly they never
    > hold a candle to the steaks I grill at home. Of course I'm not talking
    > about what some people consider "real" steakhouses, I'm talking about
    > the standard places like Outback, Lone Star, et al.
    >
    > I grill my steaks in a very particular way, with the end result being a
    > charred outside and VERY pink & juicy inside, and I prefer my grilled
    > steaks over the aforementioned restaurant steaks hands down in just
    > about every category (doneness, juiciness, consistency, overall taste,
    > etc). I can go into more detail about how I cook my steaks if
    > necessary, but to save space, I'll hold off for now.
    >
    > HOWEVER...
    >
    > The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a restaurant
    > steak to have "that taste"? I hope you know what I'm talking about.
    > There is some particular kind of flavor that is present in almost any
    > restaurant steak, regardless of where you get it or how you ordered it.
    > It even has its own aroma. I will admit, I like that aspect of
    > restaurant steaks. But unfortunately, it almost always comes down to a
    > great aroma and that great initial taste, followed by the meat turning
    > into a chewy, tasteless wad of rubber once you begin to chew.
    >
    > I'd like to add "that taste" to my grilled steak at home, since "that
    > taste" is the one and only thing that's missing. I've tried, but I
    > cannot reproduce it. I've used a hot cast iron skillet, I've tried
    > numerous seasonings, liquid smoke, etc, and none of it produces that
    > restaurant flavor. Some people say you have to use meat from a
    > butcher, but I say noway, because those restaurant steaks having "that
    > taste" usually have very poor texture and consistency. If butcher meat
    > yields "that taste" + poor texture and consistency, then I'd rather
    > continue with what I use (typically custom cut at Krogers, 1.5-2.0"
    > thick). Other people say you have to cook it using methods ABC, or
    > XYZ, or ABX, or AYZ, or XBC, or some other very subjective combination.
    >
    > Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    > spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    > Thanks in advance!



    Read here:

    http://www.sysco.com/products/promo/break-for-steak.asp

    Dimitri
     
  3. On 29 Dec 2004 13:49:44 -0800, "dakota2112"
    <dakota2112@yahoo.com> scribbled some thoughts:


    >The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a restaurant
    >steak to have "that taste"? I hope you know what I'm talking about.
    >There is some particular kind of flavor that is present in almost any
    >restaurant steak, regardless of where you get it or how you ordered it.
    >It even has its own aroma. I will admit, I like that aspect of
    >restaurant steaks. But unfortunately, it almost always comes down to a
    >great aroma and that great initial taste, followed by the meat turning
    >into a chewy, tasteless wad of rubber once you begin to chew.
    >


    Called a barbecue sauce? Chances are they are not going to
    give away their trade secret. If you want to know, then
    you'll have to work there and find out.

    Could be growth hormone?

    As some stealth camersas have found, could be bodily fluids.
    Which is why you should say a blessing over your meals,
    especially away from home.

    Longpig?

    You'll probably have to experiment or get some Omaha steaks.

    --

    Sincerely, | NOTE: Best viewed in a fixed pitch font
    | (©) (©)
    Andrew H. Carter | ------ooo--(_)--ooo------
    d(-_-)b | /// \\\
     
  4. pavane

    pavane Guest

    "Dimitri" <Dimitri_C@prodigy.net> wrote in message
    news:qVFAd.7560$_X7.3978@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    > "dakota2112" <dakota2112@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    > news:1104356984.172960.107990@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    > > I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    > > answer.
    > > ......
    > > Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    > > spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    > > Thanks in advance!

    >
    >
    > Read here:
    >
    > http://www.sysco.com/products/promo/break-for-steak.asp
    >
    > Dimitri
    >


    Oh yeah, that really explains it. The good restaurant steaks in the
    country come from Sysco. Profound. Does it matter how they are
    prepped, how seasoned before cooking, how cooked, how seasoned
    after cooking? No, just it has to come from Sysco. Geez, what a
    culinary genius.

    pavane
     
  5. It's most likely that it was coated with clarified butter before it was
    put on the grill. I worked at a very upscale restaurant and we only
    served filet mignon and new york strip. I watched the chef coat every
    steak with clarified butter before putting it on the grill. Also, you
    can not buy as a consumer the grade of meat available to restaurants.
    It's a matter of supply and demand. There are so many restaurants
    vying for top quality meat and willing to pay top dollar for it that a
    meat market or grocer can't afford or can't justify passing that cost
    on to their customers.
    dakota2112 wrote:
    > I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a

    conclusive
    > answer.
    >
    > Let me explain. Firstly, I'm very picky about my steaks. In fact, I
    > very rarely order a steak at a restaurant, because frankly they never
    > hold a candle to the steaks I grill at home. Of course I'm not

    talking
    > about what some people consider "real" steakhouses, I'm talking about
    > the standard places like Outback, Lone Star, et al.
    >
    > I grill my steaks in a very particular way, with the end result being

    a
    > charred outside and VERY pink & juicy inside, and I prefer my grilled
    > steaks over the aforementioned restaurant steaks hands down in just
    > about every category (doneness, juiciness, consistency, overall

    taste,
    > etc). I can go into more detail about how I cook my steaks if
    > necessary, but to save space, I'll hold off for now.
    >
    > HOWEVER...
    >
    > The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a

    restaurant
    > steak to have "that taste"? I hope you know what I'm talking about.
    > There is some particular kind of flavor that is present in almost any
    > restaurant steak, regardless of where you get it or how you ordered

    it.
    > It even has its own aroma. I will admit, I like that aspect of
    > restaurant steaks. But unfortunately, it almost always comes down to

    a
    > great aroma and that great initial taste, followed by the meat

    turning
    > into a chewy, tasteless wad of rubber once you begin to chew.
    >
    > I'd like to add "that taste" to my grilled steak at home, since "that
    > taste" is the one and only thing that's missing. I've tried, but I
    > cannot reproduce it. I've used a hot cast iron skillet, I've tried
    > numerous seasonings, liquid smoke, etc, and none of it produces that
    > restaurant flavor. Some people say you have to use meat from a
    > butcher, but I say noway, because those restaurant steaks having

    "that
    > taste" usually have very poor texture and consistency. If butcher

    meat
    > yields "that taste" + poor texture and consistency, then I'd rather
    > continue with what I use (typically custom cut at Krogers, 1.5-2.0"
    > thick). Other people say you have to cook it using methods ABC, or
    > XYZ, or ABX, or AYZ, or XBC, or some other very subjective

    combination.
    >
    > Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    > spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    > Thanks in advance!
     
  6. Levelwave©

    Levelwave© Guest

    cmjohnston@gmail.com wrote:

    > Also, you
    > can not buy as a consumer the grade of meat available to restaurants.
    > It's a matter of supply and demand.



    But he's talking about places like Outback... If I had to take a guess
    I'd say most of those places use a heavily salted seasoning consisting
    of a large dose of MSG.

    ~john
     
  7. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    pavane wrote:

    > "Dimitri" <Dimitri_C@prodigy.net> wrote in message
    > news:qVFAd.7560$_X7.3978@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
    >
    >>"dakota2112" <dakota2112@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >>news:1104356984.172960.107990@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >>
    >>>I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    >>>answer.
    >>>......
    >>>Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    >>>spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    >>>Thanks in advance!

    >>
    >>
    >>Read here:
    >>
    >>http://www.sysco.com/products/promo/break-for-steak.asp
    >>
    >>Dimitri
    >>

    >
    >
    > Oh yeah, that really explains it. The good restaurant steaks in the
    > country come from Sysco. Profound. Does it matter how they are
    > prepped, how seasoned before cooking, how cooked, how seasoned
    > after cooking? No, just it has to come from Sysco. Geez, what a
    > culinary genius.
    >
    > pavane



    You're trying to be sarcastic, but most restaurant steaks probably *do*
    come from Sysco.

    The taste is probably the aging of the meat, or MSG.

    Bob
     
  8. "Levelwave©" <~last_exit@utc.edu> wrote in message
    news:33h89pF408m05U1@individual.net...
    > cmjohnston@gmail.com wrote:
    >
    >> Also, you
    >> can not buy as a consumer the grade of meat available to restaurants.
    >> It's a matter of supply and demand.

    >
    >
    > But he's talking about places like Outback... If I had to take a guess I'd
    > say most of those places use a heavily salted seasoning consisting of a
    > large dose of MSG.
    >
    > ~john


    "That taste" is why I never order a steak in a place like that. IMO< they
    reek of chemicals. OTOH, at a top notch steak house, you generally get a
    superior product cooked the way you like.
    --
    Ed
    http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/
     
  9. Louis Cohen

    Louis Cohen Guest

    dakota2112 wrote:
    > I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    > answer.
    >
    > Let me explain. Firstly, I'm very picky about my steaks. In fact, I
    > very rarely order a steak at a restaurant, because frankly they never
    > hold a candle to the steaks I grill at home. Of course I'm not talking
    > about what some people consider "real" steakhouses, I'm talking about
    > the standard places like Outback, Lone Star, et al.
    >
    > I grill my steaks in a very particular way, with the end result being a
    > charred outside and VERY pink & juicy inside, and I prefer my grilled
    > steaks over the aforementioned restaurant steaks hands down in just
    > about every category (doneness, juiciness, consistency, overall taste,
    > etc). I can go into more detail about how I cook my steaks if
    > necessary, but to save space, I'll hold off for now.
    >
    > HOWEVER...
    >
    > The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a restaurant
    > steak to have "that taste"? I hope you know what I'm talking about.
    > There is some particular kind of flavor that is present in almost any
    > restaurant steak, regardless of where you get it or how you ordered it.
    > It even has its own aroma. I will admit, I like that aspect of
    > restaurant steaks. But unfortunately, it almost always comes down to a
    > great aroma and that great initial taste, followed by the meat turning
    > into a chewy, tasteless wad of rubber once you begin to chew.
    >
    > I'd like to add "that taste" to my grilled steak at home, since "that
    > taste" is the one and only thing that's missing. I've tried, but I
    > cannot reproduce it. I've used a hot cast iron skillet, I've tried
    > numerous seasonings, liquid smoke, etc, and none of it produces that
    > restaurant flavor. Some people say you have to use meat from a
    > butcher, but I say noway, because those restaurant steaks having "that
    > taste" usually have very poor texture and consistency. If butcher meat
    > yields "that taste" + poor texture and consistency, then I'd rather
    > continue with what I use (typically custom cut at Krogers, 1.5-2.0"
    > thick). Other people say you have to cook it using methods ABC, or
    > XYZ, or ABX, or AYZ, or XBC, or some other very subjective combination.
    >
    > Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    > spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    > Thanks in advance!
    >

    There is a famous steakhouse in Brooklyn, the name eludes me at the
    moment. The owners (3rd or so generation) select each carcass at the
    wholesaler. They claim that grandpa taught them how to choose the best
    beef, and that's their advantage.

    They also age the beef.

    Finally, it's hard to find real prime meat in retail stores.

    --

    ===============================================================
    Regards

    Louis Cohen

    "Yes, yes, I will desalinate you, you grande morue!"

    Émile Zola, Assommoir 1877
     
  10. silentking

    silentking Guest

    I work at a "name" Steakhouse. The biggest concerns are the quality of
    beef that you use. Prime is the quality. Also there are wet aged and dry
    aged steaks available. Both have their own flavor profile. We use dry
    aged steaks. We most certainly DON'T get our steaks from Sysco. We have
    our own company that we deal with. There is also a spice blend that goes
    on our steak. Salt is a very little part of that seasoning. Every
    steakhouse has their own version of the seasoning. Also the grill may
    have something to do with it. We use 1800 degree grills that sear the
    outside of the steak. It creates a "crust" that holds in all the
    moisture of the steak. I'll tell you, even out well done steaks are
    pretty moist!
    The first thing you might want to try is getting prime steak. Generally
    you can't get it in a butcher shop, but I have seen online places that
    sell prime beef. It's not cheap, but it is worth every mouthful!
    Good luck, and I expect an invite to your first BBQ/Grilling day next
    summer!

    Peter


    dakota2112 wrote:
    > I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    > answer.
    >
    > Let me explain. Firstly, I'm very picky about my steaks. In fact, I
    > very rarely order a steak at a restaurant, because frankly they never
    > hold a candle to the steaks I grill at home. Of course I'm not talking
    > about what some people consider "real" steakhouses, I'm talking about
    > the standard places like Outback, Lone Star, et al.
    >
    > I grill my steaks in a very particular way, with the end result being a
    > charred outside and VERY pink & juicy inside, and I prefer my grilled
    > steaks over the aforementioned restaurant steaks hands down in just
    > about every category (doneness, juiciness, consistency, overall taste,
    > etc). I can go into more detail about how I cook my steaks if
    > necessary, but to save space, I'll hold off for now.
    >
    > HOWEVER...
    >
    > The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a restaurant
    > steak to have "that taste"? I hope you know what I'm talking about.
    > There is some particular kind of flavor that is present in almost any
    > restaurant steak, regardless of where you get it or how you ordered it.
    > It even has its own aroma. I will admit, I like that aspect of
    > restaurant steaks. But unfortunately, it almost always comes down to a
    > great aroma and that great initial taste, followed by the meat turning
    > into a chewy, tasteless wad of rubber once you begin to chew.
    >
    > I'd like to add "that taste" to my grilled steak at home, since "that
    > taste" is the one and only thing that's missing. I've tried, but I
    > cannot reproduce it. I've used a hot cast iron skillet, I've tried
    > numerous seasonings, liquid smoke, etc, and none of it produces that
    > restaurant flavor. Some people say you have to use meat from a
    > butcher, but I say noway, because those restaurant steaks having "that
    > taste" usually have very poor texture and consistency. If butcher meat
    > yields "that taste" + poor texture and consistency, then I'd rather
    > continue with what I use (typically custom cut at Krogers, 1.5-2.0"
    > thick). Other people say you have to cook it using methods ABC, or
    > XYZ, or ABX, or AYZ, or XBC, or some other very subjective combination.
    >
    > Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    > spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    > Thanks in advance!
    >
     
  11. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Wed, 29 Dec 2004 21:49:44 GMT in <1104356984.172960.107990
    @f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>, dakota2112@yahoo.com (dakota2112) wrote :

    >I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    >answer.
    >
    >Let me explain. Firstly, I'm very picky about my steaks. In fact, I
    >very rarely order a steak at a restaurant, because frankly they never
    >hold a candle to the steaks I grill at home. Of course I'm not talking
    >about what some people consider "real" steakhouses, I'm talking about
    >the standard places like Outback, Lone Star, et al.
    >
    >I grill my steaks in a very particular way, with the end result being a
    >charred outside and VERY pink & juicy inside...
    >
    >HOWEVER...
    >
    >The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a restaurant
    >steak to have "that taste"? ...
    >
    >Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    >spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    >Thanks in advance!


    I think part of the problem here is that you're describing a subjective
    experience. If something has a quality that is elusive enough that you
    can't really describe it in any way other than saying "that taste", then
    essentially by definition nobody can give a definitive answer because you
    haven't posed a definitive question. You can only "know" things about
    something for which you can get a factual description.

    However, if there is one constant I've observed in restaurants, regardless
    of quality level, it's salting. Specifically, virtually all restaurants
    salt steaks heavily. To me the level of salt is extreme - far larger than
    anything I'd do at home. But then again, I find that restaurants salt
    *everything* to excess IMHO. And I suspect that may be what you're
    referring to.

    Try salting your steaks very heavily before cooking and see if that
    reproduces the flavour you're thinking of. Don't dismiss the idea ahead of
    time with a "no, it's not a salty flavour I'm tasting". Salt is one of
    those seasonings that can alter the flavour of food in ways you wouldn't
    necessarily imagine were attributable to it.


    --
    Alex Rast
    ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  12. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <95CF60F7adrastnwnotlinkcom@216.168.3.44>,
    ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com (Alex Rast) wrote:

    > at Wed, 29 Dec 2004 21:49:44 GMT in <1104356984.172960.107990
    > @f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>, dakota2112@yahoo.com (dakota2112) wrote :
    >
    > >I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    > >answer.
    > >
    > >Let me explain. Firstly, I'm very picky about my steaks. In fact, I
    > >very rarely order a steak at a restaurant, because frankly they never
    > >hold a candle to the steaks I grill at home. Of course I'm not talking
    > >about what some people consider "real" steakhouses, I'm talking about
    > >the standard places like Outback, Lone Star, et al.
    > >
    > >I grill my steaks in a very particular way, with the end result being a
    > >charred outside and VERY pink & juicy inside...
    > >
    > >HOWEVER...
    > >
    > >The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a restaurant
    > >steak to have "that taste"? ...
    > >
    > >Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    > >spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    > >Thanks in advance!

    >
    > I think part of the problem here is that you're describing a subjective
    > experience. If something has a quality that is elusive enough that you
    > can't really describe it in any way other than saying "that taste", then
    > essentially by definition nobody can give a definitive answer because you
    > haven't posed a definitive question. You can only "know" things about
    > something for which you can get a factual description.
    >
    > However, if there is one constant I've observed in restaurants, regardless
    > of quality level, it's salting. Specifically, virtually all restaurants
    > salt steaks heavily. To me the level of salt is extreme - far larger than
    > anything I'd do at home. But then again, I find that restaurants salt
    > *everything* to excess IMHO. And I suspect that may be what you're
    > referring to.


    Actually, I knew exactly what he was talking about... ;-)
    I've learned that, when I go out to eat, I need to put in a special
    request to the chefs for a "low salt" meal. Works for me, and the steaks
    still have "that taste".

    Part of it is the grilling, part of it is the marinade.
    When I first posted, I had not thought about the MSG, but I guess that
    might be a bit part of it. That and the meat quality.

    >
    > Try salting your steaks very heavily before cooking and see if that
    > reproduces the flavour you're thinking of. Don't dismiss the idea ahead of
    > time with a "no, it's not a salty flavour I'm tasting". Salt is one of
    > those seasonings that can alter the flavour of food in ways you wouldn't
    > necessarily imagine were attributable to it.


    Like Brining???

    Is it possible to brine meats other than poultry and get a good result?

    I've never tried it, so I don't know a lot about it.

    --
    K.

    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<


    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems&include=0&userid=katra
     
  13. On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 03:47:34 -0600, Katra <KatraMungBean@centurytel.net>
    wrote:

    >Like Brining???
    >Is it possible to brine meats other than poultry and get a good result?
    >I've never tried it, so I don't know a lot about it.


    I brine pork all the time. I have a lovely brine using bitter orange juice
    and chipotle powder that imparts a wonderful flavour to those center cut
    pork chops one can find on sale. I hate dry pork more than pretty much
    anything.

    I believe you could call corned beef "brined" on a technical level, but
    most of the people I've spoken to about brining agree you can't really
    brine beef.

    You can brine fish (you have to be really careful with fish and not
    over-brine it), pork, and poultry that I know about. I imagine you could do
    more exotic meats, as well. Hmmmm brined ostrich... I should try that.

    --
    Siobhan Perricone
    Humans wrote the bible,
    God wrote the rocks
    -- Word of God by Kathy Mar
     
  14. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "pavane" <pavanecastsoutspam@cfl.rr.com> wrote in message
    news:mQIAd.155630$8G4.150743@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
    >
    > "Dimitri" <Dimitri_C@prodigy.net> wrote in message
    > news:qVFAd.7560$_X7.3978@newssvr33.news.prodigy.com...
    >>
    >> "dakota2112" <dakota2112@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    >> news:1104356984.172960.107990@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
    >> > I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    >> > answer.
    >> > ......
    >> > Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    >> > spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    >> > Thanks in advance!

    >>
    >>
    >> Read here:
    >>
    >> http://www.sysco.com/products/promo/break-for-steak.asp
    >>
    >> Dimitri
    >>

    >
    > Oh yeah, that really explains it. The good restaurant steaks in the
    > country come from Sysco. Profound. Does it matter how they are
    > prepped, how seasoned before cooking, how cooked, how seasoned
    > after cooking? No, just it has to come from Sysco. Geez, what a
    > culinary genius.
    >
    > pavane


    You really are an idiot.

    Read from their 10Q

    Sysco Corporation, acting through its subsidiaries and divisions
    (collectively referred to as "SYSCO" or the "company"), is the largest North
    American distributor of food and related products primarily to the
    foodservice
    or "food-prepared-away-from-home" industry. Founded in 1969, SYSCO provides
    its
    products and services to approximately 400,000 customers, including
    restaurants,
    healthcare and educational facilities, lodging establishments and other
    foodservice customers.


    With 400,000 customers chances are well maybe you can figure out the rest.
    Oh you and BTW their sales will top 29 BILLION

    "As of July 3, 2004, SYSCO and its operating companies had approximately
    47,800 full-time employees, approximately 19% of whom were represented by
    unions, primarily the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. Contract
    negotiations are handled locally. Collective bargaining agreements covering
    approximately 21% of the company"s union employees expire during fiscal
    2005.
    SYSCO considers its labor relations to be satisfactory."

    Dimitri
     
  15. Here's my take on your quest for 'that taste".
    Restaurants use quality cooking gear, that you're not likely to have at
    home, but you can come close. Use the highest heat you can muster with
    the equipment you have. Use prime beef.
    Brush the meat before cooking with some oilve oil or clarified butter,
    then lightly season the steak with S&P, or try it with Char Crust, or
    Gibsons Roasting Salt*, (*see Steak Lovers Cookbook)
    Cook hot and fast 2-3 min per side, moving the meat on each side to
    create cross hatch marks. When the blood just comes to the top surface
    of the 2nd side, move it to a cooler section of the grill to cook
    through. For rare, move to the cooler section 'before' any blood
    appears. Just before serving, drizzle a teaspoon of light olive oil or
    melted clarified butter over each steak.

    Is short, you don't have the lab in New Jersey available to you to
    create your perfect flavor. For you: Trial and error, it'll get
    better, and move on. Keep improving. Develop your own "taste". Thats
    what makes it fun.

    Pierre
     
  16. dakota2112

    dakota2112 Guest

    Thanks everyone for all the responses!

    I know my question sounded very subjective, and I realize there's no
    real way to "describe" a flavor that I don't know how to reproduce. I
    guess if I could describe it (for example say it tastes like this plus
    that), then I could probably reproduce the flavor, so I wouldn't need
    to ask the question then ;-)

    But in all seriousness, I've discussed this with several people, and
    most of them know immediately what I'm talking about when I say
    "restaurant steak taste".

    I'm thinking it might have something to do with either heavy salting,
    or perhaps even the use of MSG. I know some meat tenderizers have MSG
    in them, maybe that's it.

    I'm leary of MSG just because it's apparently very bad health-wise, and
    a steak is already bad enough (cholesterol, fat, calories...) so I
    probably won't use MSG on a regular basis, but I might just give it a
    try next time to see if that does the trick.

    And in case anyone's curious, here's how I cook my steak. I get
    1.5"-2.0" ribeye/strip/porterhouse. Marinate for 30 minutes in "Grill
    Creations Black Peppercorn" mixed with olive oil. Get the grill as hot
    as it will go, and sear each side until a char crust forms. I let the
    grease fire go crazy, this helps achieve the char. Once the char crust
    is there, cook over low heat, keeping the steak bathed in clean
    peppercorn/oil mixture. My steaks are done when the darkest red
    interior has just turned pink. If conditions are right, the entire
    inside of the steak will be deep pink, with a thick char crust on the
    outside. Having a very thick steak helps that happen.

    Serve with horseradish, mashed potatoes, sweet Hawaiian rolls, and red
    wine.

    I contend that the red wine at least helps offset a slight amount of
    damage I'm doing to myself by eating a steak in the first place. ;-)

    And olive oil is good for the body, except I've read that when it
    reaches its smoking point and beyond, that it turns into a carcinogen.
    So much for the olive oil. And I think I also read somewhere that
    charred meat is also a carcinogen itself. But it sure does make for a
    good steak ;-)

    Thanks again all.
     
  17. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Louis Cohen" <louiscohen@alum.mit.edu> wrote in message
    news:MsKdnYY1a5_K4E7cRVn-qA@comcast.com...

    <snip>

    > There is a famous steakhouse in Brooklyn, the name eludes me at the
    > moment. The owners (3rd or so generation) select each carcass at the
    > wholesaler. They claim that grandpa taught them how to choose the best
    > beef, and that's their advantage.
    >
    > They also age the beef.
    >
    > Finally, it's hard to find real prime meat in retail stores.
    >
    > --
    >
    > ===============================================================
    > Regards
    >
    > Louis Cohen


    Peter Luger

    http://www.peterluger.com/

    Dimitri
     
  18. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    dakota2112 wrote:
    > I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a conclusive
    > answer.
    >
    > Let me explain. Firstly, I'm very picky about my steaks. In fact, I
    > very rarely order a steak at a restaurant, because frankly they never
    > hold a candle to the steaks I grill at home. Of course I'm not
    > talking about what some people consider "real" steakhouses, I'm
    > talking about the standard places like Outback, Lone Star, et al.
    >
    > I grill my steaks in a very particular way, with the end result being
    > a charred outside and VERY pink & juicy inside, and I prefer my
    > grilled steaks over the aforementioned restaurant steaks hands down
    > in just about every category (doneness, juiciness, consistency,
    > overall taste, etc). I can go into more detail about how I cook my
    > steaks if necessary, but to save space, I'll hold off for now.
    >
    > HOWEVER...
    >
    > The one thing I have yet to figure out is, how do they get a
    > restaurant steak to have "that taste"?


    I've read this thread with interest. I never noticed "that taste" but then,
    I normally only eat steak either when I cook it at home or, if I'm out it's
    when I'm travelling so it's never the same.

    I'm curious as to why, if the steaks you grill at home "don't hold a candle"
    to the ones you order when out, why are you asking how to duplicate the
    taste?

    Jill
     
  19. Halvdan

    Halvdan Guest

    I think aged beef has that "taste". It's got this musky like flavor
    that seems to come out, I've noticed that smell usually from raw beef
    from my days as a line cook.

    Visit: http://www.onlinecooking.net We're still building but we're
    getting there. I'd love to post some of these topics on my web site,
    I'm also taking submissions.
     
  20. BOB

    BOB Guest

    dakota2112 wrote:
    > I've searched through this forum but I'm not able to find a
    > conclusive answer.
    >

    Snipped
    >
    > Your comments please? Does anyone *know* for sure what specific
    > spice, procedure, etc. is needed to produce "that taste"?
    > Thanks in advance!


    Part of it may be similar to the "wok hay" effect. I bet you very
    carefully and completely clean your cooking/grilling surfaces.
    Restuarants and steak houses do not. I'm not saying that they aren't
    clean and safe, I'm suggesting that you are cleaning off the seasonings on
    your cooking surface, possibly even leaving cleaning chemicals on them.
     

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