Jump to content








Photo

Cyclists/elitism?


  • Please log in to reply
96 replies to this topic

#1 rclouviere

rclouviere

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 68 posts

Posted 19 September 2011 - 06:46 PM

I've been cycling now for about 5 years; after running for many years.  I really enjoy cycling, but there doesn't seem to be the same attitude between cyclists and runners.  Other runners seem much more supportive, friendly, etc.  I know this is a pretty broad statement, and I have clearly seen many very friendly, supportive cyclists, but there are quite a few cyclists that seem to think of themselves as better than others.  Is this just me?  Does this have to do with spending lots of money on bikes/equipment?















#2 alienator

alienator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,598 posts

Posted 19 September 2011 - 07:44 PM

It's got nothing to do with cycling.  It has everything to do with the person.  Elitist cyclists are jerks in other parts of their lives, too.  Frankly, I think it's a waste of time to even think about.  Instead, I prefer to think about how nice a ride is, how great the scenery is, how painful the grade is, and when I ride with others, how good the ride with others was.  Likewise, not seeing another cyclist wave back doesn't bother me.  

 

Sunday's ride left me thinking about the climbing, the mountains, the adult bobcat and two cubs we saw crossing the road, and how hot Marisa Tomei was in her first nude scenes in "Before the Devil Knows Your Dead."


  • EvilGreg likes this
You're so fetching when you're down on all fours.
..............................-David St. Hubbins

#3 bjjoondo

bjjoondo

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 19 September 2011 - 07:54 PM

I think it's more that cycling seems to either be a "lonewolf" pastime or you have to find a "specific" group that rides , "your style". I have a hybrid style tandem and single bike, that's not what you show up too with the local racing club or the local "touring" club either. I'm a rec./utility/lite touring style rider, I don't "train", being in pace line isn't something I have any interest in, I just like to ride. I'm a member of the local general bike club, (Colorado Springs Cycling Club) but I don't really, RIDE with them. Maybe a event or ride now and then. LOL, even the "Social Rides" are faster than my wife and I like to go so we mostly ride by ourselves. 

 

So if you need to be in group, check out all the local shops and see what kind of riding groups they have or know of, hopefully you can find the type of riders who share your intrests, if not then you might just have to take up, Lonewolf riding and ENJOY! Jmho, Ymmv. have a most excellent day! :)



#4 baj32161

baj32161

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 492 posts

Posted 21 September 2011 - 05:38 PM

Cycling mirrors the world in which we live, as do many other "activities" With cycling being such a niche activity, the idiosyncracies tend to be more easily noticed. I also see it in internet forums, where anonymity can enbolden a person to act in a way they never would in a face to face environment. I have sen elitism in every aspect of my life. cycling is no different. Where I live now, I have run into all types, the vast majority being terrific folks.

 

Cheers,

 

Brian J.


"Don't think, feeeeeeeeeeeeel....
It is like a finger, pointing away
to the moon......
Don't concentrate on the finger,
or you'll miss all that Heavenly glory."

Bruce Lee
"Enter The Dragon"

#5 swampy1970

swampy1970

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,238 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 06:40 AM

This is the reason I pretty much always cycle alone. I couldn't give two hoots about what bike a person rides, the wheels they're rolling on or what they do for a living. Sure, it's a conversation starter but at the end of the day it's all about the ride and having fun - whether that's taking in 10,000+ft of climbing, smashing each others brains out until someone cracks or hitting the descents hard until someone chickens out. But, all I get from grouprides overhere is the same ol' same ol' diatribe of "I need these wheels, I need this bike, I need, I need, I need... I'll go lots faster if I do...Bicycling magazine tells me I'll be so much better if I do..." My replies of "no, you need mommy to slap some sense into you and give you a warm bottle of 'man up' so you can press on the pedals harder" always seem to be taken the wrong way. Too many frail egos, not enough hard faced bast&rds that like caustic sarcasm.


  • jmlag likes this

#6 Beersk

Beersk

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 32 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 08:09 AM



Originally Posted by swampy1970 View Post

But, all I get from grouprides overhere is the same ol' same ol' diatribe of "I need these wheels, I need this bike, I need, I need, I need... I'll go lots faster if I do...Bicycling magazine tells me I'll be so much better if I do..." My replies of "no, you need mommy to slap some sense into you and give you a warm bottle of 'man up' so you can press on the pedals harder" always seem to be taken the wrong way. Too many frail egos, not enough hard faced bast&rds that like caustic sarcasm.


Haha, that's hilarious.  Agree 100%

 



#7 An old Guy

An old Guy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,266 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 10:04 AM



Originally Posted by rclouviere View Post

... but there are quite a few cyclists that seem to think of themselves as better than others.  Is this just me?  Does this have to do with spending lots of money on bikes/equipment?


Anyone who rides with a 52/12 is is a lot better than I am. He has a right to be elitist.

 


A 50/16 high gear is sufficient to finish a solo 100 miles in under 5 hours. A 50/14 is sufficient to finish in under 4 hours. Unless you are a pro anything higher is just pretending


#8 tonyzackery

tonyzackery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,516 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 10:20 AM

I don't see what you're describing as elitism, I see it as a greater degree of competitiveness.

Runners/joggers on a group run aren't constantly racing and trying to drop each other like cyclists do when on group rides.  To the top of every hill is a race, every ending destination becomes a race, every town sign turns into a sprint - just the nature of the beasts that ride road bikes. 

 

When I go mountain biking with friends, the dynamic of the group is more akin to being out jogging - much more relaxed attitude.  Once on a road bike, guys transform into different animals.


Do, or do not - there is no "try".

#9 An old Guy

An old Guy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,266 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 06:33 PM


 

Originally Posted by tonyzackery View Post

Runners/joggers on a group run aren't constantly racing and trying to drop each other like cyclists do when on group rides.  To the top of every hill is a race, every ending destination becomes a race, every town sign turns into a sprint - just the nature of the beasts that ride road bikes. 

 

 

Around here only the second rate bicyclists act as you describe. They do think they are elite.

 


 

 


A 50/16 high gear is sufficient to finish a solo 100 miles in under 5 hours. A 50/14 is sufficient to finish in under 4 hours. Unless you are a pro anything higher is just pretending


#10 tonyzackery

tonyzackery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,516 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 06:43 PM



Originally Posted by An old Guy View Post


 

 

Around here only the second rate bicyclists act as you describe. They do think they are elite.

 


 

 


 

Your perception is your reality, and that I will never deny...
 

 


Do, or do not - there is no "try".

#11 davereo

davereo

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,639 posts

Posted 22 September 2011 - 07:49 PM

How do we know what people are thinking. It comes down to your concieved perception. There again how could I possibly know that.



#12 alienator

alienator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,598 posts

Posted 23 September 2011 - 12:08 AM



Originally Posted by davereo View Post

How do we know what people are thinking. It comes down to your concieved perception. There again how could I possibly know that.


This is the winning answer.  


You're so fetching when you're down on all fours.
..............................-David St. Hubbins

#13 dhk2

dhk2

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,038 posts

Posted 23 September 2011 - 06:59 AM



Originally Posted by An old Guy View Post


 

 

Around here only the second rate bicyclists act as you describe. They do think they are elite.

 


 

 



Around here most group rides have guys on the front who like to challenge each other on hills and sprints.  That's not elitism to me, just having fun.  My skinny buddies who kill me on the hills aren't doing it to prove they are better than me,  it's just that they are faster riders uphill and have no need to hang back with us "normal" bodyfat percentage-types. 

 

If I beat them on the speed limit sign sprint on any given day,  suppose I get a little bit of that "old man's still can bring it" feeling.  No danger thought, my skinny ex-racer buddy on the steel bike(with dt shifters and rack on the back) will put me back in my place soon enough.  He and lots of others always will always be faster than me, but we're still good riding buddies. 



#14 danfoz

danfoz

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,430 posts

Posted 23 September 2011 - 07:41 AM

 

I see competiveness as an evolution of play which young animals in the wild do it as a way to hone their skills to take down prey, attract mates, or wittle down competition for said mates. That is unless you're playing teacup parties and dress up dolly and there's nothing wrong with that either. The older we get, the less interested in playing and competition. My 18 year old decrepit cat who is going to kick the bucket someday soon is less interested in playing with his younger 8 year old mate than he was five years ago. Not neccessarily a good thing or a bad thing, just is. Then again some of us never played well with others.

 

There are elitists and a-holes in all walks of life. I don't think equipment has anything to do with it. I witnessed this in my years in martial arts and I think some of it does come being very good at something and letting it go to your head, and coincidentally many strong riders are in possession of better equipment. But I imagine anyone who engages in playful, even dare I say sarcastic discourse on this forum is probably fun to ride with on the bike, regardless of how good they are.

 

 

 

 


"It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses, and you have no such accurate remembrance."
~ Ernest Hemingway

#15 tonyzackery

tonyzackery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,516 posts

Posted 23 September 2011 - 09:07 AM

Since we're diggin' deep into crackerjack psychology box, I might as well take a handful...

 

People compete as long as they're competitive.  If they feel they're not competitive against the competition, they won't compete for fear of failure.  And it is also true that some people have never had much of a competitive streak, regardless of age.

 

Get a bunch of 80yoguys on road bikes and I guarantee they will test (compete against) each other.  Put those same 80yos in with a group of 40yos and they won't be so keen to compete.

People don't cease to be playful/competitive as they age, it's only that their opportunities to play/compete amongst comparable competition/ability/skill become fewer and further between.


Do, or do not - there is no "try".

#16 alienator

alienator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,598 posts

Posted 23 September 2011 - 11:07 AM

Competing is not necessarily a binary choice:  you do because you still can or you don't because you fear failure. It's entirely possible to just not be interested in competing with others in a given activity, and given the breadth of personalities and personality types walking the Earth, or in the case pedaling the Earth, it's likely the reasons for competing or not competing will be more than any listed in this thread.


You're so fetching when you're down on all fours.
..............................-David St. Hubbins

#17 tonyzackery

tonyzackery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,516 posts

Posted 23 September 2011 - 11:39 AM

Equivocation not necessary - I compete because I can, failure notwithstanding. 

Did you mention the explanation as to why you personally don't compete/race?  If you did, my mistake in requesting you repeat it.  

Lastly, anything is possible but it makes sense to narrow one's choices to what's within the realm of most reasonable when attempting to explain human behavior.  Joe Obvious I can be when necessary...


Do, or do not - there is no "try".

#18 alienator

alienator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,598 posts

Posted 23 September 2011 - 05:21 PM

Uh-huh.  


You're so fetching when you're down on all fours.
..............................-David St. Hubbins

#19 Myosmith

Myosmith

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 103 posts

Posted 24 September 2011 - 07:24 AM

There will always be a percentage of snobs and jerks in any activity you choose, but among cyclists in general, I've not noticed elitism, per se.There are definately levels among cyclists and you have to realistically assess where you are and decide where you want to be or you can end up out of place. I do a lot of solo riding at my own pace, somedays pushing to my limits, other days just cruising. I'm happy with my homebuilt hybrid for my own fitness and pleasure riding and don't get upset when guys on $2,000 carbon fiber racing bikes blow past me like I'm standing still.

 

I ride very comfortably with my club's Saturday morning rides which are moderately paced, medium distance and open to beginners, hybrids, and people who just want a pleasant ride. At the end of the season I started riding with the Tuesday PM group which is geared for novices seriously interested in developing road skills and pack riding. The pace is quicker, the distance longer, and the riding more demanding. I am slightly out of place there as I'm not as fit as most riders in the group and my bike is heavier and with a hybrid rather than a road geometry. I can keep up with the slower subgroup and nobody has given me the impression that I'm looked down on or shouldn't be there.

 

That said, the club also has other groups including experienced riders training for competition, competitive cyclocross, hard-core fitness, etc. and I'd be a fool to show up expecting to ride with them. I'm not currently a good enough rider nor properly equipped to average 22+ mph over hilly terrain for 40 miles. That's not the group being "elitist" it's just reality and it would be kind on their part to tell me so if I was not bright enough to realize it myself.



#20 forever young

forever young

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 24 September 2011 - 01:51 PM



Originally Posted by swampy1970 View Post

This is the reason I pretty much always cycle alone. I couldn't give two hoots about what bike a person rides, the wheels they're rolling on or what they do for a living. Sure, it's a conversation starter but at the end of the day it's all about the ride and having fun - whether that's taking in 10,000+ft of climbing, smashing each others brains out until someone cracks or hitting the descents hard until someone chickens out. But, all I get from grouprides overhere is the same ol' same ol' diatribe of "I need these wheels, I need this bike, I need, I need, I need... I'll go lots faster if I do...Bicycling magazine tells me I'll be so much better if I do..." My replies of "no, you need mommy to slap some sense into you and give you a warm bottle of 'man up' so you can press on the pedals harder" always seem to be taken the wrong way. Too many frail egos, not enough hard faced bast&rds that like caustic sarcasm.

+10



 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users