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Hey, Im kinda new to all this... need some advice


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#1 Vlad Morozov

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 11:34 AM

So after having my Trek 4300 recently stolen, Im now in the market for, maybe, a more appropriate bike for my needs.

I commute a lot with the bike, and I like to work out on the bike as well. I live in NYC (Brooklyn) so some of you might be familiar with how beat up some of the roads and sidewalks are, so its gotta be sturdy.

Someone suggested that the best purchase would be a KHS cyclocross (I figure the CX100), as it is sturdy and a great work out... and will last. Ive also looked at the Kona Jake bike.

My budget is between $750-1000.

Anyone have any suggestions? Comments?

Thanks.















#2 Mark George

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 09:21 AM

Check this rugged cross bike out at bikes direct.                                         http://www.bikesdire.../outlaw.htm  



#3 goodbyecycle

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 11:29 AM

Buy a used bike, you can get a lot more bike for your money. Especially this time of year. I started out with a bike from bikesdirect and it was a good deal for the money but you can do better buying used.


We buy used high end bikes. Fill out a simple form on our website and get a quote.


#4 oldbobcat

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 12:43 PM

This is going to cause some anger and indignation.

 

If you're new at this, and you're moving up from a Trek 4300, and you know nothing about bike mechanics, and you might not even know what size you want, and you might want the support of a helpful service department, then see your local shops about recreational cyclocross bikes. This is a growing market segment and many brands are offering some really nice bikes at decent prices.

 

Or, ask the shop of your choice what they'd charge to build up a BikesDirect bike, and if they'd cast aspersions if you became a regular service customer. BikesDirect has some good deals and they want you as a return customer, but they don't build the bike and they don't do service.

 

Regarding used bikes, ask the seller if it's OK to bring the bike to a shop for a service estimate before you put down any cash.



#5 goodbyecycle

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 11:28 AM

That seems like a decent suggestion as well, no anger here! The reason I suggested used is the budget... 750 to 1000 is not much for a new bike. 


We buy used high end bikes. Fill out a simple form on our website and get a quote.


#6 alienator

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 01:36 PM



Originally Posted by oldbobcat View Post

This is going to cause some anger and indignation.

 

If you're new at this, and you're moving up from a Trek 4300, and you know nothing about bike mechanics, and you might not even know what size you want, and you might want the support of a helpful service department, then see your local shops about recreational cyclocross bikes. This is a growing market segment and many brands are offering some really nice bikes at decent prices.

 

Or, ask the shop of your choice what they'd charge to build up a BikesDirect bike, and if they'd cast aspersions if you became a regular service customer. BikesDirect has some good deals and they want you as a return customer, but they don't build the bike and they don't do service.

 

Regarding used bikes, ask the seller if it's OK to bring the bike to a shop for a service estimate before you put down any cash.

 

All around good advice.  I will add this:  if a bike shop isn't willing to build up or assemble a bike you ordered elsewhere, you may want to find a different shop.  While I know very well that a larger number of bikes shops have taken financial hits because of the availability of inexpensive bike stuff, I don't believe that those financial hits justify snubbing a customer or gouging said customer on maintenance and/or repair.

 

For your price range, you can get a pretty nice used bike, so I would also recommend considering a used bike  Likewise, I recommend you visit a few bike shops in your area to see what said shops have to offer, given your price constraints.
 

 

 


You're so fetching when you're down on all fours.
..............................-David St. Hubbins




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