£800 road bike suggestions?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by The Oracle, Jul 26, 2003.

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  1. The Oracle

    The Oracle Guest

    Hi, I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking to build my own so I
    need to buy a complete bike - ready to go . I am getting the feel from some of the discussions here
    that the Giant OCR is a good one and the Specialised Allez too. I am a beginner at road racing and
    want to buy something that'll both get me started and see me through to some races when I get mor
    experienced. Am I thinking along the right lines with the models I suggested?

    Thanks guys!!
     
    Tags:


  2. Nigel Heels

    Nigel Heels Guest

    I would go for something with 21 or 24 speeds, verily light Aluminum frame, I like Trek and
    Cannondale personally... But on Ebay I know you can buy some new bikes with not too bad hardware for
    a good price..

    "The Oracle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking
    to
    > build my own so I need to buy a complete bike - ready to go . I am getting the feel from some of
    > the discussions here that the Giant OCR is a good
    one
    > and the Specialised Allez too. I am a beginner at road racing and want to buy something that'll
    > both get me started and see me through to some races when I get mor experienced. Am I thinking
    > along the right lines with the models I suggested?
    >
    > Thanks guys!!
     
  3. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 26 Jul 2003 14:47:55 +0100, "The Oracle" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Am I thinking along the right lines with the models I suggested?

    The first thign to do is find a local bike shop that specialises in road bikes (like A W Cycles in
    Caversham, but I bet you don't live close to Reading) and get measured. Once you've got a
    comprehensive bike fit analysis you will know which models will fit, then you can set about
    test-riding them.

    AW have many top bikes in stock. If your LBS has only a couple of road bikes and not necessarily in
    your size, try going slightly further afield. My analysis from here & the other cycling NGs is that
    it's very easy to buy a bike which looks good on paper but when it arrives the geometry is just not
    right. A grand is a lot of cash. When I bought a bike for that kind of money I went to a shop over
    60 miles away.

    Personal opinion, YMMV, usual disclaimers, but I vote for going somewhere they know road bikes and
    let you try them.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com [currently
    offline awaiting ADSL transfer to new ISP]
     
  4. A Lee

    A Lee Guest

    Nigel Heels <[email protected]> wrote: Snips
    > "The Oracle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hi, I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking

    > I would go for something with 21 or 24 speeds, verily light Aluminum frame, I like Trek and
    > Cannondale personally... But on Ebay I know you can buy some new bikes with not too bad hardware
    > for a good price..

    21 or 24 gears? That means 7 or 8 speed at the back. You'll be pushed to find a bike over £500
    without 9 speed now.

    To the original poster, any of the 'big' names give good quality reliable bikes.The spec. on all of
    them is roughly the same.The main difference is between Campag and Shimano equipment,after that,
    between a 'compact' or std. frame,and steel/ally, and then it comes down the colour of the bike.
    Whatever you buy at that price will be good. Just go out and buy what you like the best. Alan.

    --
    Change the 'minus' to 'plus' to reply by e-mail. http://www.dvatc.co.uk - Off-road Cycling in the
    North Midlands.
     
  5. Erdefen

    Erdefen Guest

    The Oracle wrote:

    > Hi, I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking to build my own so I
    > need to buy a complete bike - ready to go . I am getting the feel from some of the discussions
    > here that the Giant OCR is a good one and the Specialised Allez too. I am a beginner at road
    > racing and want to buy something that'll both get me started and see me through to some races when
    > I get mor experienced. Am I thinking along the right lines with the models I suggested?
    >
    > Thanks guys!!

    Have a look in Halfords they have a racer a TDF2003 Apollo, yellow with aluminium frame for approx
    £250. I was sorely tempted when looking for a tourer but fortunately head ruled the heart and I
    bought a Raleigh P4000 for the same price. Good Luck Erdefen

    --
    (Antispam, drop pants to EMail) All outgoing Emails checked for Virus with Norton.
     
  6. Micheal Ra

    Micheal Ra Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > The first thign to do is find a local bike shop that specialises in road bikes (like A W Cycles in
    > Caversham, but I bet you don't live close to Reading) and get measured. Once you've got a
    > comprehensive bike fit analysis you will know which models will fit, then you can set about
    > test-riding them.
    >
    What exactly is this "comprehensive bike fit analysis"? When I bought the Chilliwack from AW about
    11 months ago they just looked at me and said that I'd need the biggest frame (56cm), which they
    didn't have prepared at that time. They had the bike prepared when I returned a couple of days
    later. I tried the bike out; it was comfortable and so I bought it. Since then I've raised the
    saddle quite a lot and it's become even more comfortable.

    Mr. Chilliwack
     
  7. W K

    W K Guest

    "The Oracle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi, I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking
    to
    > build my own so I need to buy a complete bike - ready to go . I am getting the feel from some of
    > the discussions here that the Giant OCR is a good
    one
    > and the Specialised Allez too.

    Even though many people hate "ribble", thats where I'd go. Many bad tales of poor mail order
    service, but if you live anywhere near preston its probably worth going and you'll get more bike for
    your money.

    OTOH I was there once, empty shop, a customer ordering a bike had just left. The blokes working
    there were having an impromptu customer services review: inc: "so, you think I sounded like a didn't
    give a shit"
     
  8. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 27 Jul 2003 00:44:40 -0700, [email protected] (Micheal Ra) wrote:

    >What exactly is this "comprehensive bike fit analysis"?

    It's a computerised bike fitting tool - not unlike the one at http://www.wrenchscience.com but
    operated by trained staf so the measurements should be accurate.

    >When I bought the Chilliwack from AW about 11 months ago they just looked at me and said that I'd
    >need the biggest frame (56cm),

    For a bike of that kind that's perfectly adequate, but for a road bike it may well not be.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com [currently
    offline awaiting ADSL transfer to new ISP]
     
  9. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    >> What exactly is this "comprehensive bike fit analysis"?
    >
    > It's a computerised bike fitting tool - not unlike the one at http://www.wrenchscience.com but
    > operated by trained staf so the measurements should be accurate.

    But appropriate? How does the program know what suits the rider? There is not one single ideal
    riding position for everyone.

    ~PB
     
  10. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 18:26:09 +0100, "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >> It's a computerised bike fitting tool - not unlike the one at http://www.wrenchscience.com but
    >> operated by trained staf so the measurements should be accurate.

    >But appropriate? How does the program know what suits the rider? There is not one single ideal
    >riding position for everyone.

    That's where the Trained Operator comes in ;-)

    I've used the wrenchscience tool to set up bikes; it's pretty good. Certainly good enough that you
    are straight into millimetric adjustments rather than "raise saddle by three inches."

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com [currently
    offline awaiting ADSL transfer to new ISP]
     
  11. "The Oracle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi, I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking to build my own so I
    > need to buy a complete bike - ready to go . I am getting the feel from some of the discussions
    > here that the Giant OCR is a good one and the Specialised Allez too.

    Couple of sources not to be overlooked;

    (a) Previous years' models in sales - can get you a little bit more bike (spec-wise, not literally -
    unless you happen upon some really good offers on tandems!!) for your money, yet aren't old hat
    technically. Big mail order specialists like, say, F. W. Evans, Geoffrey Butler and
    b. E. James offer good deals from time to time on such bikes (including ones from both of the makers
    you mention) - worth buying Cycling Weekly to keep an eye out for offers.
    (c) The S/H market in a couple of weeks time. Around that time of year, CW and other mags seem to
    have lots of classified ads for top-end road bikes being flogged off cheaply, bought by people
    'inspired' by Le Tour on telly, but trying to get back some of their money after the initial
    excitement wore off, they realised that cycling was a bit like hard work, or a mix of both ;-)

    David E. Belcher
     
  12. dannyfrankszzz

    dannyfrankszzz New Member

    Joined:
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    Save yourself some trouble and buy your bike from:

    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/

    You get the best value for your £, no arguments.

    Their service wasn't great but when the bike did eventually arrive, I was very pleased. Go for one of the deals advertised in the back of cycling weekly.
     
  13. Nigel

    Nigel Guest

    I have just bought a new road bike for around £900 pounds, and would recommend if you live any where
    near London that you pay a visit to Condor cycles(gray's inn road, www.condorcycles.com).

    I bought an italian veloce with alu frame, carbon forks and Camp' velcoe groupset

    The bike is handbuilt in the shop for you, so you specify a change of components if needed, rather
    than a mass produced bike from the far east.

    I have ridden nearly 500 miles in the last month or so and have to say it is one of the best most
    comfortable bikes I have ridden...even on the awful back roads of Kent.

    "The Oracle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi, I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking to build my own so I
    > need to buy a complete bike - ready to go . I am getting the feel from some of the discussions
    > here that the Giant OCR is a good one and the Specialised Allez too. I am a beginner at road
    > racing and want to buy something that'll both get me started and see me through to some races when
    > I get mor experienced. Am I thinking along the right lines with the models I suggested?
    >
    > Thanks guys!!
     
  14. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    dannyfrankszzz <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Save yourself some trouble and buy your bike from:

    : http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/

    : You get the best value for your £, no arguments.

    True, but I'd add the very big rider *ONLY IF YOU CAN GO IN PERSON*.

    Do NOT deal with them mail order - they are awful beyond belief.

    I'd say that a new rider is better going to a good shop though - if the OP says where they live then
    we might be able to recommened one between us.

    Arthur
     
  15. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    > On Sat, 26 Jul 2003 14:47:55 +0100, "The Oracle" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Am I thinking along the right lines with the models I suggested?
    >
    >
    > The first thign to do is find a local bike shop that specialises in road bikes (like A W Cycles in
    > Caversham, but I bet you don't live close to Reading) and get measured. Once you've got a
    > comprehensive bike fit analysis you will know which models will fit, then you can set about
    > test-riding them.
    >
    > AW have many top bikes in stock. If your LBS has only a couple of road bikes and not necessarily
    > in your size, try going slightly further afield. My analysis from here & the other cycling NGs is
    > that it's very easy to buy a bike which looks good on paper but when it arrives the geometry is
    > just not right. A grand is a lot of cash. When I bought a bike for that kind of money I went to a
    > shop over 60 miles away.
    >
    > Personal opinion, YMMV, usual disclaimers, but I vote for going somewhere they know road bikes and
    > let you try them.
    >
    > Guy
    > ===
    > ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com [currently
    > offline awaiting ADSL transfer to new ISP]

    Me too - find a bike shop that will measure you and fit you to a bike. I regret not having done this
    - it's been an expensive and somewhat scary time sorting out the bike I *did* get.

    Being fitted properly for a bike (and not just on leg length and a quick 'yeah, looks fine mate')
    makes the world of difference.

    Velvet
     
  16. Velvet

    Velvet Guest

    Micheal Ra wrote:

    >>
    >
    > What exactly is this "comprehensive bike fit analysis"? When I bought the Chilliwack from AW about
    > 11 months ago they just looked at me and said that I'd need the biggest frame (56cm), which they
    > didn't have prepared at that time. They had the bike prepared when I returned a couple of days
    > later. I tried the bike out; it was comfortable and so I bought it. Since then I've raised the
    > saddle quite a lot and it's become even more comfortable.
    >
    > Mr. Chilliwack

    In my case, I worked out from leg length what frame size I'd need. Shop stuck me on bike when I went
    to collect, and said yes, it was fine.

    I found out later, once I twigged all was NOT fine at all, that the top tube was too long (my bike
    is one of the smaller frame sizes available) and I was far too stretched out on it. Four stems
    later, it's much improved - but still a compromise over the dimensions the frame *should* be. For
    me, it led to problems with knees hitting -ahem- various parts of my anatomy occasionally, feeling
    the bars far too far away, fingers not able to wrap around the levers properly, bars being too low,
    inability to steer (since bars already out of reach moved FURTHER away on one side), saddle being as
    far forward as possible to reduce reach, which led to incorrect knee/leg position for pedalling,
    weight distribution on the bike was utterly up the creek, etc etc etc.

    I suspect people in the middle of the size ranges probably CAN get on a bike and adapt to them,
    unless they have body proportions out of the average relationships - but unless you've ridden a bike
    like that before, you often have no idea if you have long arms/short legs, or vice versa, or long
    arms and legs but short trunk...

    If I ever get another bike, I'm getting a frame fitted to me, and then built up with components from
    there. Unless I get a 'bent before I wear this bike out :)

    Velvet
     
  17. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    The Oracle wrote:

    > Hi, I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking to build my own so I
    > need to buy a complete bike - ready to go . I am getting the feel from some of the discussions
    > here that the Giant OCR is a good one and the Specialised Allez too. I am a beginner at road
    > racing and want to buy something that'll both get me started and see me through to some races when
    > I get mor experienced. Am I thinking along the right lines with the models I suggested?

    If you've ridden them, you like them, and they fit, that sounds fine. My current choice would be a
    2002 model Lemond Buenos Aires which currently scrapes in just inside your limit with the £350
    discount off the list price (being last years model), but is only available in one size (mine at
    that!). As its available from an online shop which also has a physical shop, it should be possible
    to try it out before placing an order. I can't afford it, sadly.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
  18. Micheal Ra

    Micheal Ra Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > It's a computerised bike fitting tool - not unlike the one at http://www.wrenchscience.com but
    > operated by trained staf so the measurements should be accurate.
    Thanks for the link. I'll try making some of those measurements and see what it comes up with.

    > For a bike of that kind that's perfectly adequate, but for a road bike it may well not be.
    So what criteria are used to decide whether a bike fit analysis is appropriate?

    Mr. Chilliwack
     
  19. In message <[email protected]>, Micheal Ra <[email protected]> writes
    >"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >> It's a computerised bike fitting tool - not unlike the one at http://www.wrenchscience.com but
    >> operated by trained staf so the measurements should be accurate.
    >Thanks for the link. I'll try making some of those measurements and see what it comes up with.
    >
    >> For a bike of that kind that's perfectly adequate, but for a road bike it may well not be.
    >So what criteria are used to decide whether a bike fit analysis is appropriate?
    >
    >Mr. Chilliwack

    It's worth it for road bikes where you typically spend many hours in the same position, less
    valuable for mountain bike type frames where people tend to spend time off and on the saddle and
    make more adjustments to saddle position anyway.

    For road bikes the fit is important both for comfort and because of the increased importance of
    transferring power from the body to the machine.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  20. Prjones

    Prjones Guest

    "The Oracle" <koja[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I have £800 to spend - at a push £1000. I don't know enough about biking to build my own so I need
    > to buy a complete bike - ready to go .... ... I am a beginner at road racing and want to buy
    > something that'll both get me started and see me through to some races when I get more
    > experienced. Am I thinking along the right lines ...?

    Greetings Oracle,

    Are you thinking along the right lines? Dunno, but my thoughts plead a little patience and run along
    slightly different lines.

    With respect, I suggest you become a little less green. Keep your powder dry until you (who have the
    money) know enough to discuss with those who will sell you something what it is that you want,
    rather than allowing those who want the money to tell you what it is you want.

    Let me illustrate how these insights might be cheaply gained. A visit to my weekly auction last
    night yielded to me (for £2 each!) a pair of tidy lightweight (13kg each) road bikes, 21" and 23"
    frames, one a 10-speed and the other a 12-speed, one with 170mm cranks the other
    175mm.

    Armed with some coins make a similar auction visit. By ringing the changes on a small collection of
    such bikes (interchanging different seats and seat posts, stems, and cranks etc), and by riding the
    permutations extensively, one would soon gain, at virtually no cost, a clearer idea of what one
    wanted and what one was comfortable with. Use a tape measure and keep a notebook of sketches and
    dimensions.

    You might even want to do some initial races on these "mules" -- there's no reason why they should
    be real clunkers.

    A visit to the bike shop of your choice in due course armed with that notebook and tape measure
    should ensure that when you do spend your £800 you are not disappointed: what you buy will be
    governed by your head and not by your heart.

    Best wishes prjones
     
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