1/8th Quick Link?



D

Duncan Smith

Guest
Has anyone come across an SRAM quick-link for 1/8th chains, or a close
equivalent? I want to be able to replace a link on the road without a
chain tool. I've seen photos of some Wipperman chains that have
something called a spring link - but can't tell whether they require a
tool or not - or even whether they're available in the UK..

Many thanks,

Duncan
 
C

Clive George

Guest
"Duncan Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Has anyone come across an SRAM quick-link for 1/8th chains, or a close
> equivalent? I want to be able to replace a link on the road without a
> chain tool. I've seen photos of some Wipperman chains that have
> something called a spring link - but can't tell whether they require a
> tool or not - or even whether they're available in the UK..


Do you remember the traditional chain link for these chains? Came in 3
parts - plate with two extra long pins, plate with two holes in, and a clip
which went on the outside of the plate and clipped onto the pins (which had
recesses to allow this).

Question is, when you say "replace a link on the road", what do you mean?
Coz whatever link you use, if you're trying to get rid of the inner one (eg
because it's bent) you'll need a chain tool - unless the entire chain is
made of quick links!

cheers,
clive
 
M

M-gineering

Guest
Duncan Smith wrote:
> Has anyone come across an SRAM quick-link for 1/8th chains, or a close
> equivalent? I want to be able to replace a link on the road without a
> chain tool. I've seen photos of some Wipperman chains that have
> something called a spring link - but can't tell whether they require a
> tool or not - or even whether they're available in the UK..
>
> Many thanks,
>
> Duncan
>

Current Sram PC1 comes with a quicklink I think: bend the chain with the
link, and the outer plate with elongated holes comes off

--
/Marten

info(apestaartje)m-gineering(punt)nl
 
D

David Damerell

Guest
Quoting Duncan Smith <[email protected]>:
>Has anyone come across an SRAM quick-link for 1/8th chains, or a close
>equivalent? I want to be able to replace a link on the road without a
>chain tool.


I just got a KMC 1/8 chain which includes a tool-less master link. It was
easy to install and remove when clean; I have not yet tried with it
covered in road scunge.
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
Today is Second Aponoia, October.
 
D

Duncan Smith

Guest
On Oct 22, 4:15 pm, "Clive George" <[email protected]> wrote:
> "Duncan Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]
>
> > Has anyone come across an SRAM quick-link for 1/8th chains, or a close
> > equivalent? I want to be able to replace a link on the road without a
> > chain tool. I've seen photos of some Wipperman chains that have
> > something called a spring link - but can't tell whether they require a
> > tool or not - or even whether they're available in the UK..

>
> Do you remember the traditional chain link for these chains? Came in 3
> parts - plate with two extra long pins, plate with two holes in, and a clip
> which went on the outside of the plate and clipped onto the pins (which had
> recesses to allow this).


Almost sounds like the Wipperman spring link, did you just have to
prise the clip with a screwdriver to open the chain, and pop it back
with your fingers to close it?

>
> Question is, when you say "replace a link on the road", what do you mean?
> Coz whatever link you use, if you're trying to get rid of the inner one (eg
> because it's bent) you'll need a chain tool - unless the entire chain is
> made of quick links!
>


My current track chain has a simple threaded nut that passes through a
roller and threads into a plate at the other end. I put a little
loctite around the thread and so far no problems. However, strikes me
that below zero some water could turn to ice and potentially cause
trouble with this arrangement.

I'm trying to make the commute as self-sufficient as possible, so
would like to plan for the contigency of a chain breaking in the dark
in freezing conditions. While I'm getting pretty good with the old
chain-tool, I wouldn't like guarantee my chances with cold fingers or
dropping pins in the dark, etc. So I was thinking of carrying a spare
chain of the right length just ready to slip on with a powerlink -
except I've not seen one yet..

Thanks,

Duncan
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Clive George wrote:

> Question is, when you say "replace a link on the road", what do you
> mean? Coz whatever link you use, if you're trying to get rid of the
> inner one (eg because it's bent) you'll need a chain tool - unless
> the entire chain is made of quick links!


That part of the job is dead easy. It's much more time consuming, fiddly
and risky to join a chain, so it makes sense to carry a quick link even
though you'll still need a tool for removing links.

~PB
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Duncan Smith wrote:
> I'm trying to make the commute as self-sufficient as possible, so
> would like to plan for the contigency of a chain breaking in the dark
> in freezing conditions. While I'm getting pretty good with the old
> chain-tool, I wouldn't like guarantee my chances with cold fingers or
> dropping pins in the dark, etc. So I was thinking of carrying a spare
> chain of the right length just ready to slip on with a powerlink -
> except I've not seen one yet..


A spare chain is quite a ot of weight and bulk to carry around. Removing a
link should only take a minute, and hopefully you'll find a quick link for
joining. Disposable vinyl gloves help with the cold.

Perhaps more than one quick link could be used if you need to make the chain
longer.

~PB
 
On 22 Oct, 16:37, Duncan Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
> I'm trying to make the commute as self-sufficient as possible, so
> would like to plan for the contigency of a chain breaking in the dark
> in freezing conditions.


This is unlikely, especially if you are using a heavy duty chain on a
singlespeed or fixie, where you don't have much lateral activity.

> ... I was thinking of carrying a spare
> chain of the right length just ready to slip on with a powerlink -
> except I've not seen one yet..


SRAM PC-1 comes with a connector, however it weighs 330g, which is a
lot of weight to carry. The connectors are probably available
seperately.

If I were worried about this, I would carry a couple of spare links
with connectors. That should get you out of most situations.
Last time I broke a chain I knocked a pin through with a nail and a
handy stone.

Cheers,
W.
 
D

Duncan Smith

Guest
On Oct 22, 5:28 pm, "Pete Biggs"
<[email protected]> wrote:
> Duncan Smith wrote:
> > I'm trying to make the commute as self-sufficient as possible, so
> > would like to plan for the contigency of a chain breaking in the dark
> > in freezing conditions. While I'm getting pretty good with the old
> > chain-tool, I wouldn't like guarantee my chances with cold fingers or
> > dropping pins in the dark, etc. So I was thinking of carrying a spare
> > chain of the right length just ready to slip on with a powerlink -
> > except I've not seen one yet..

>
> A spare chain is quite a ot of weight and bulk to carry around. Removing a
> link should only take a minute, and hopefully you'll find a quick link for
> joining. Disposable vinyl gloves help with the cold.
>
> Perhaps more than one quick link could be used if you need to make the chain
> longer.


Thanks, do you mean like the gloves you get at garages at the diesel
pumps or the thicker gloves you get for washing up dishes with?

I got an SRAM-PC1 which does the job - quick link works OK.

Perhaps I could do without the chain if I carried my chain-tool, but I
think my sturdy chain-cracker weighs even more than the chain! There
a chain tool on my SKS portable toolkit, but the link holder doesn't
have enough depth for a 1/8 link, so the pin striker contacts too far
below the pin center for it to work.

Maybe I should try and find a portable toolkit whose chain tool is
compatible for 3/32 and 1/8 links...

Thanks,

Duncan
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Duncan Smith wrote:

>> A spare chain is quite a ot of weight and bulk to carry around.
>> Removing a link should only take a minute, and hopefully you'll find
>> a quick link for joining. Disposable vinyl gloves help with the
>> cold.
>>
>> Perhaps more than one quick link could be used if you need to make
>> the chain longer.

>
> Thanks, do you mean like the gloves you get at garages at the diesel
> pumps or the thicker gloves you get for washing up dishes with?


The former.

> I got an SRAM-PC1 which does the job - quick link works OK.
>
> Perhaps I could do without the chain if I carried my chain-tool, but I
> think my sturdy chain-cracker weighs even more than the chain!


Could holes be drilled in it? ;-)

> There
> a chain tool on my SKS portable toolkit, but the link holder doesn't
> have enough depth for a 1/8 link, so the pin striker contacts too far
> below the pin center for it to work.
>
> Maybe I should try and find a portable toolkit whose chain tool is
> compatible for 3/32 and 1/8 links...


How about all those who own 1/8" chains test with their portable chain tools
for Duncan?

(I don't).

~PB
 
Z

Zog The Undeniable

Guest
Duncan Smith wrote:
> Has anyone come across an SRAM quick-link for 1/8th chains, or a close
> equivalent? I want to be able to replace a link on the road without a
> chain tool. I've seen photos of some Wipperman chains that have
> something called a spring link - but can't tell whether they require a
> tool or not - or even whether they're available in the UK..


If you search long and hard, some SRAM PC-1 chains can be found with the
old-style 3-piece link. Sometimes these can be undone with a
fingernail, sometimes you need a screwdriver to prise off the "circlip".