1000 mile check up

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Penny S, Sep 13, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    drifting the odometer thread...

    Wow, 1 K.. that's a pretty neato thing to me even if I'm not going out for a prize.

    What I want to know is this: Time to seriously go over bike, check stuff, tune & fix. I may or may
    not do this myself. I may have a pal do it who loves to wrench on bikes and is happy to do what ever
    I need in exchange for a custom fleece. ( in a timely fashion, too!)Maybe I';; do some of it myself
    but I would consider myself to be one clueless wrenchette...

    anyway, I know this much already - the pedal spindles are bad, middle chainring has a broken tooth
    and the rear wheel has a nasty flat spot in the rim. I have a new wheel and new chain ring ready to
    go. The fork is now a low priority as I had it rebuilt by RS at NORBA; however they did a crappy job
    and its seeping a bit again. ;-( I can ignore that for now, go Bomber next year maybe.

    what else needs to be checked, gone over (you can skip the totally obvious like brake pads and
    worn tires)

    penny
     
    Tags:


  2. "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > drifting the odometer thread...
    >
    > Wow, 1 K.. that's a pretty neato thing to me even if I'm not going out for
    a
    > prize.
    >
    > What I want to know is this: Time to seriously go over bike, check stuff, tune & fix. I may or may
    > not do this myself. I may have a pal do it who loves to wrench on bikes and is happy to do what
    > ever I need in exchange for a custom fleece. ( in a timely fashion, too!)Maybe I';; do some of it
    > myself but I would consider myself to be one clueless wrenchette...
    >
    > anyway, I know this much already - the pedal spindles are bad, middle chainring has a broken tooth
    > and the rear wheel has a nasty flat spot in
    the
    > rim. I have a new wheel and new chain ring ready to go. The fork is now a low priority as I had it
    > rebuilt by RS at NORBA; however they did a crappy job and its seeping a bit again. ;-( I can
    > ignore that for now, go Bomber next year maybe.
    >
    > what else needs to be checked, gone over (you can skip the totally obvious like brake pads and
    > worn tires)
    >
    > penny
    >
    >

    I think that the new chain rings would like to have a new chain. It would make them happy.

    remove, clean and grease the seat post.

    clean, grease & check headset bearings.

    check you front wheel spokes, rim & bearings, hold the wheel, in each hand, by the axle and spin (
    you'll have to let go with one hand for a moment to spin it, or use your nose) - does it spin freely
    or can you feel it drag?

    check bottom bracket (which you'll do when you replace the chain ring)

    I spray my derailleurs and cables with silicone, especially the last bit that loops into the rear
    derailleur. With the rear wheel off you should be able to move the derailleur forward and drop the
    cable housing out of the thingy. Slide the housing back and forth and clean the exposed cable. Do
    this in private as cable exposure is illegal in most states.

    Don't forget to put the seat post back!
    --
    DTW .../\.../\.../\...

    I've spent most of my money on mountain biking and windsurfing. The rest I've just wasted.
     
  3. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    In news:[email protected], D T W .../\... <[email protected]> scrawled in
    bright red lipstick:
    >> I think that the new chain rings would like to have a new chain. It
    > would make them happy.

    chain is just a couple of months old, I have lbs guy check it regularly.
    >
    > remove, clean and grease the seat post.

    do I need to do this if post tends to slip if I don't have clamp just right?

    thanks
     
  4. "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > In news:[email protected], D T W .../\... <[email protected]> scrawled in
    > bright red lipstick:
    > >> I think that the new chain rings would like to have a new chain. It
    > > would make them happy.
    >
    > chain is just a couple of months old, I have lbs guy check it regularly.
    > >
    > > remove, clean and grease the seat post.
    >
    > do I need to do this if post tends to slip if I don't have clamp just
    right?
    >
    > thanks
    >
    >

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/stuck-seatposts.html

    http://cambriabike.com/qr/seat_bolts&collars.htm

    --
    DTW .../\.../\.../\...

    I've spent most of my money on mountain biking and windsurfing. The rest I've just wasted.
     
  5. Mattb

    Mattb Guest

    "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > drifting the odometer thread...
    <snip>
    > what else needs to be checked, gone over (you can skip the totally obvious like brake pads and
    > worn tires)
    >
    > penny
    >
    >

    New housings and cables might be good in addition to what has already been suggested.

    Matt
     
  6. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > drifting the odometer thread...
    >
    > Wow, 1 K.. that's a pretty neato thing to me even if I'm not going out for
    a
    > prize.
    >
    > What I want to know is this: Time to seriously go over bike, check stuff, tune & fix. I may or may
    > not do this myself. I may have a pal do it who loves to wrench on bikes and is happy to do what
    > ever I need in exchange for a custom fleece. ( in a timely fashion, too!)Maybe I';; do some of it
    > myself but I would consider myself to be one clueless wrenchette...
    >
    > anyway, I know this much already - the pedal spindles are bad, middle chainring has a broken tooth
    > and the rear wheel has a nasty flat spot in
    the
    > rim. I have a new wheel and new chain ring ready to go. The fork is now a low priority as I had it
    > rebuilt by RS at NORBA; however they did a crappy job and its seeping a bit again. ;-( I can
    > ignore that for now, go Bomber next year maybe.
    >
    > what else needs to be checked, gone over (you can skip the totally obvious like brake pads and
    > worn tires)
    >
    > penny
    >
    >

    Suspension pivot bearings. 'Sealed' bearings aren't really. Take the bolts out of the center of them
    and gently pry the seal out with the point of a knife or pick. Clean out the inside of the bearing
    with degreaser and when clean and dry repack with grease. Pop the seals back in and bolt the bike
    back together. If you find any bearings that has become seized up replace
    it. The size and type is molded into the seal. It's not a terribly difficult job for the
    home mechanic.

    Rear shock maintenance time too. If you have a Fox air shock you can download a service video for
    your shock from http://www.foxracingshox.com . Use Englund's Slick Honey grease.

    Mike
     
  7. Alex Ravenel

    Alex Ravenel Guest

    "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > drifting the odometer thread...
    >
    > Wow, 1 K.. that's a pretty neato thing to me even if I'm not going out for a prize.
    >
    > What I want to know is this: Time to seriously go over bike, check stuff, tune & fix. I may or may
    > not do this myself. I may have a pal do it who loves to wrench on bikes and is happy to do what
    > ever I need in exchange for a custom fleece. ( in a timely fashion, too!)Maybe I';; do some of it
    > myself but I would consider myself to be one clueless wrenchette...
    >
    > anyway, I know this much already - the pedal spindles are bad, middle chainring has a broken tooth
    > and the rear wheel has a nasty flat spot in the rim. I have a new wheel and new chain ring ready
    > to go. The fork is now a low priority as I had it rebuilt by RS at NORBA; however they did a
    > crappy job and its seeping a bit again. ;-( I can ignore that for now, go Bomber next year maybe.
    >
    > what else needs to be checked, gone over (you can skip the totally obvious like brake pads and
    > worn tires)
    >
    > penny
    >
    >

    Bottom bracket? You would be surprised how nasty they get. Most of them are sealed too (only enough
    to keep you from getting into it though, dirt has an easy enough time). If it is too gunked up, just
    replace it. I would take it off the bike and spin it--if it is rough or if the bearings have flat
    spots, its probably time for a new one.

    Generally, I would say clean and check pretty well any moving part, especially if it is "sealed."

    --
    --------
    Alex Ravenel http://www.theravenel.net
     
  8. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    (top posted so no one has to read the whole list if they don't' want to)

    Great list, thanks. Next questions, which of the jobs are not for a clueless wrenchette armed with
    web printouts from Sheldon Brown and Park too, maybe a copy of Zinn and a halfway decent set basic
    set of bike tools? Which jobs are better left to those who truly know what they do? Remember I may
    be inexperienced but I am trainable.

    Penny


    Michael Dart scrawled in bright red lipstick:
    > > Suspension pivot bearings. 'Sealed' bearings aren't really. Take the
    > bolts out of the center of them and gently pry the seal out with the point of a knife or pick.
    > Clean out the inside of the bearing with degreaser and when clean and dry repack with grease. Pop
    > the seals back in and bolt the bike back together. If you find any bearings that has become seized
    > up replace it. The size and type is molded into the seal. It's not a terribly difficult job for
    > the home mechanic.
    >
    > Rear shock maintenance time too. If you have a Fox air shock you can download a service video for
    > your shock from http://www.foxracingshox.com . Use Englund's Slick Honey grease.
    >
    > Mike

    MattB scrawled in bright red lipstick:

    New housings and cables might be good in addition to what has already been suggested.

    D T W .../\... scrawled in bright red lipstick:
    >
    > I think that the new chain rings would like to have a new chain. It would make them happy.
    >
    > remove, clean and grease the seat post.
    >
    > clean, grease & check headset bearings.
    >
    > check you front wheel spokes, rim & bearings, hold the wheel, in each hand, by the axle and spin (
    > you'll have to let go with one hand for a moment to spin it, or use your nose) - does it spin
    > freely or can you feel it drag?
    >
    > check bottom bracket (which you'll do when you replace the chain ring)
    >
    > I spray my derailleurs and cables with silicone, especially the last bit that loops into the rear
    > derailleur. With the rear wheel off you should be able to move the derailleur forward and drop the
    > cable housing out of the thingy. Slide the housing back and forth and clean the exposed cable. Do
    > this in private as cable exposure is illegal in most states.
    >
    >
    > Don't forget to put the seat post back!
     
  9. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    Continuing the top post.

    I pretty much described what you need to do in my post. The bearings aren't a big deal. Once you pop
    off the 'seal' you'll see what you need to do. The shock may be a bit much. Like I said if you have
    a Fox Float air shock you can download the service video that covers a complete rebuild but will
    show you what to do to get inside and reassemble the device. Feel free to email direct further
    questions.

    Mike

    "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >
    > (top posted so no one has to read the whole list if they don't' want to)
    >
    > Great list, thanks. Next questions, which of the jobs are not for a
    clueless
    > wrenchette armed with web printouts from Sheldon Brown and Park too, maybe
    a
    > copy of Zinn and a halfway decent set basic set of bike tools? Which
    jobs
    > are better left to those who truly know what they do? Remember I may be inexperienced but I am
    > trainable.
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > Michael Dart scrawled in bright red lipstick:
    > > > Suspension pivot bearings. 'Sealed' bearings aren't really. Take the
    > > bolts out of the center of them and gently pry the seal out with the point of a knife or pick.
    > > Clean out the inside of the bearing with degreaser and when clean and dry repack with grease.
    > > Pop the seals back in and bolt the bike back together. If you find any bearings that has become
    > > seized up replace it. The size and type is molded into the seal. It's not a terribly difficult
    > > job for the home mechanic.
    > >
    > > Rear shock maintenance time too. If you have a Fox air shock you can download a service video
    > > for your shock from http://www.foxracingshox.com . Use Englund's Slick Honey grease.
    > >
    > > Mike
    >
    > MattB scrawled in bright red lipstick:
    >
    >
    > New housings and cables might be good in addition to what has already been suggested.
    >
    > D T W .../\... scrawled in bright red lipstick:
    > >
    > > I think that the new chain rings would like to have a new chain. It would make them happy.
    > >
    > > remove, clean and grease the seat post.
    > >
    > > clean, grease & check headset bearings.
    > >
    > > check you front wheel spokes, rim & bearings, hold the wheel, in each hand, by the axle and spin
    > > ( you'll have to let go with one hand for a moment to spin it, or use your nose) - does it spin
    > > freely or can you feel it drag?
    > >
    > > check bottom bracket (which you'll do when you replace the chain ring)
    > >
    > > I spray my derailleurs and cables with silicone, especially the last bit that loops into the
    > > rear derailleur. With the rear wheel off you should be able to move the derailleur forward and
    > > drop the cable housing out of the thingy. Slide the housing back and forth and clean the exposed
    > > cable. Do this in private as cable exposure is illegal in most states.
    > >
    > >
    > > Don't forget to put the seat post back!
     
  10. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    Michael Dart scrawled in bright red lipstick:
    > Continuing the top post.
    >
    > I pretty much described what you need to do in my post. The bearings aren't a big deal. Once you
    > pop off the 'seal' you'll see what you need to do. The shock may be a bit much. Like I said if you
    > have a Fox Float air shock you can download the service video that covers a complete rebuild but
    > will show you what to do to get inside and reassemble the device. Feel free to email direct
    > further questions.
    >
    > Mike

    You are saying that anyone could do most of this without special ( training tools whatever?)

    OK-dokey....

    Penny
     
  11. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > > I pretty much described what you need to do in my post. The bearings aren't a big deal. Once you
    > > pop off the 'seal' you'll see what you need to do. The shock may be a bit much. Like I said if
    > > you have a Fox Float air shock you can download the service video that covers a complete rebuild
    > > but will show you what to do to get inside and reassemble the device. Feel free to email direct
    > > further questions.
    > >
    > > Mike
    >
    > You are saying that anyone could do most of this without special (
    training
    > tools whatever?)
    >
    > OK-dokey....
    >
    > Penny

    Oh, great Mike...you're not supposed to encourage her!
    --
    Slacker
     
  12. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Michael Dart scrawled in bright red lipstick:
    > > Continuing the top post.
    > >
    > > I pretty much described what you need to do in my post. The bearings aren't a big deal. Once you
    > > pop off the 'seal' you'll see what you need to do. The shock may be a bit much. Like I said if
    > > you have a Fox Float air shock you can download the service video that covers a complete rebuild
    > > but will show you what to do to get inside and reassemble the device. Feel free to email direct
    > > further questions.
    > >
    > > Mike
    >
    > You are saying that anyone could do most of this without special (
    training
    > tools whatever?)
    >
    > OK-dokey....
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >

    Well, anyone who is fairly mechanically inclined that is. If you are unsure about your ablility
    don't do it yourself. Disassembling a suspension linkage on a bike like your Kona should only need
    a set of hex bits and a ratchet handle. Someone has to be able to take something apart and remember
    how to put it back together again. The shock maintenance service video is your special training and
    requires no special tools other than a soft jawed vise. It does require some hand strength though.
    Your damaged digit may prevent you from getting the shock body screwed back together. You can put
    it back on the bike partially assembled and compress the suspension to help get the shock body
    screwed on.

    If you're getting at that I'm oversimplifying. Maybe a bit. I enjoy working on bikes and am fairly
    good at it. I've built two bikes from the spokes up (Ok I had to buy the frame assembled, I don't
    know how to weld) so maybe from my perspective it's no big deal. Post some close up pics of your
    bike's pivots and shock and I could give more detailed advice. They would also serve as a guide for
    reassembly.

    Mike
     
  13. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Slacker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > > I pretty much described what you need to do in my post. The bearings aren't a big deal. Once
    > > > you pop off the 'seal' you'll see what you need to do. The shock may be a bit much. Like I
    > > > said if you have a Fox Float air shock you can download the service video that covers a
    > > > complete rebuild but will show you what to do to get inside and reassemble the device. Feel
    > > > free to email direct further questions.
    > > >
    > > > Mike
    > >
    > > You are saying that anyone could do most of this without special (
    > training
    > > tools whatever?)
    > >
    > > OK-dokey....
    > >
    > > Penny
    >
    >
    > Oh, great Mike...you're not supposed to encourage her!
    > --
    > Slacker
    >

    Am I digging a hole here? Or what?! ;^)

    Mike
     
  14. Bill Wheeler

    Bill Wheeler Guest

    On Sat, 13 Sep 2003 07:51:03 -0700, "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >drifting the odometer thread...
    >
    >Wow, 1 K.. that's a pretty neato thing to me even if I'm not going out for a prize.

    [snip]

    Penny, .... I think you should trade up to an SS.

    Peace, Bill
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...