17 inch Homegrown for 5'11" person?



fishcurry

New Member
Jul 20, 2003
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Hey all,

I've got a sweet deal going on a Schwinn Homegrown on the net and I'm wondering if this is going to be too small for me. I'm about 5'11" (I get different measurements from different doctors ranging from 5'10.5 to 6'0", it's weird). I currently ride a 20 inch frame that is far too big for me ( I should have gotten the 18 inch size a few years ago). The other size for a Homegrown is a 19 inch, but the deal I am getting is at a great price. Do you think I can just max out the seatpost? Are there any guys this tall riding a 17 inch? Standing straight with my feet together, my inseam (minus the crotch) is about 33 - 33.5 inches . The difference between the top tube lengths between a 19 incher and a 17 inch is about .6 of an inch, so I am only worried about seat tube length and getting the right leg extension.

Thanks all!

Oh. I'm gonna add that I MIGHT do some trials work, so a smaller might be
better, and I also like an aggressive position. I ride mainly trails - double and singletrack... Someone told me that the sizing on homegrowns are weird too, is this true?

OH. I'm also going to add that I hate being stuck in between two sizes. It sucks doesn't it?

I also posted this to mtbr.com, so if you've replied to this, thanks. I should think no one would care if I cross-posted to another SITE....
 

frey

New Member
May 30, 2003
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I'm 6' - 6'1 again depending on who measures me and I ride a 17" Trek 8000. Like you I was mainly after the 19" version but got a great deal on a 17" so I bought it. i've never looked back, love the size, it's so much more flexible. I ran it for a couple of years with a lot of seatpost so I could use my full leg extension, but recently I've dropped the seat so I can't lock my leg out while sat down anymore and have had loads of fun and have learnt loads too. I found I can hop it far more easily and can hang off the back on steep stuff, and just generally enjoy more technical stuff because I can move about more. Go for it, just make sure you have a big enough seatpost to cover all the options you want to try. :)
 

Ghr7891

New Member
Feb 23, 2004
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I am about 5-10 and I ride a Homegrown 19inch it is perfect for xc. The 17inch will be a more versatile bike but if you want xc performance go for the 19inch.
 

SWorksRider

New Member
Feb 24, 2004
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I'm 5'10 myself and used to ride a 17inch homegrown. A 19 inch is too big for you, i'm going to have to respectfully disagree with Ghr7891, and say that a 17 inch is perfect, and what you SHOULD be using at your size. What condition is the frame in that you bought? Always make sure that if their is visible deterioration that can be seen its nothing more than paint chipping. Have a bike mechanic look at it as well. And if you're the person who just bought my old homegrown off ebay, leave feedback! :)
 

Leo C. Driscoll

New Member
Mar 4, 2004
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Rivendell Bicycle Works has an interesting (if true) tutorial on determining the "right size" bike:

http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_romulus_8.html.

To arrive at the optimal bike size (for all of us who are close to being six feet ;-), first measure your PBH (pubic bone height). I'm serious! We're ~5'11" and Rivendell places our PBH at 34.25 inches. To determine correct saddle height (SH), (subtract 3.93 inches). So according to Rivendell our optimal SH is 30.30 inches.

Here is Rivendale's definition of SH.

"Learn your pubic bone height (PBH) and your [optimal] saddle height (SH). To measure your PBH, stand with bare feet 10-inches apart, and measure from the floor to the pubic bone. Pull up hard, so the tape (held between two thin rulers or a thin book) strikes your bone, not just your soft tissue. Have a friend take the reading on the floor. Saddle height (SH) is the distance from the center of your crank (center of the bb axle) to the top of your saddle, parallel to the seat tube. Almost always, there is a 10cm [~ 4-inches] difference [between PBH and SH]"

Sounds neat but my experience is different. I currently have four bikes (19-inch Raleigh Technium , 18-inch Marin Eldridge Grade, 18-inch Jamis Exile, and 17-inch Marin Sausalito). They have different "geometries" and different size wheels/tires. However, provided my saddle height (SH) is ~34-inches (measured along the seat tube from the top of platform pedals to the top of Brooks saddles) I can ride in my comfort zone and efficiently on any of these bikes (using Sketcher's Sport shoes).

So 5-11/6-0 club members, what is your experience? What is your optimal SH? And what saddle(s)/pedals ?
 

Leo C. Driscoll

New Member
Mar 4, 2004
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New personal rule- don't post after midnight ;-) I forgot to include Rivendell's main idea in optimal sizing. Raise the bar!

If you raise the bar, you can ride more comfortably and efficiently. The combination of high handlebar and optimally raised saddle should give you an optimal cockpit (enhanced by a larger frame bike).

http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_framesize.html

Being a horseman, I had sorta figured this out on my own. Horses that are at least 16 hands (5 feet 4-inches withers-to-level-ground) are sweeter to ride. Withers? Glad you asked ;-) The withers is the prominent ridge where the neck and the back join- the highest point on a horse.

Just as my various Brooks saddles sit ~34 inches from the top of various platform pedals, riser bars on my four bikes are ~40 inches at the "withers"- where bar and stem join- to level ground.

I think I'll now head out to Harris Cyclery and test ride Rivendell's Romulus! Any Romulus enthusiasts/critics out there?
 

Leo C. Driscoll

New Member
Mar 4, 2004
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Here's an alternative viewpoint from Yellow Jersey, Ltd.

http://www.yellowjersey.org/

"Many well-meaning people, and a few
hucksters, have tried to write computer programs and publish data tables to prescribe "fit". My beef with these "systems" is there's no listening involved. Someone measures skeletal points and recommends a top tube length, stem length and a seat position. If you are an evenly proportioned young male in competition [like everyone on cyclingforms ;-)] this may be valid. If you are unusually leggy, stumpy, female or a doddering over-40 like me these tables are worse than useless. And that list includes a MAJORITY of cyclists! I have personally been "fitted" with several "systems" none of which came close to my preferred rising position. I've moved the bulk of my classic parts from one frame to another for about 30 years, changing stems with each frame. I know where my hands want to be and that's quite a bit higher and closer than any "system" to which I've been subjected. Moreover, I like my 39cm 3ttt handlebars. They just feel right. Modern charts tell me I'm wrong but it takes some chutzpah to tell me I'm wrong about what feels right!"

This is an interesting view- coming from a bike E-tailer! Only cyclingforums or bikeforums members can buy online a bike/ frameset that fits;-)