1930 three speed lwb picture[ from does it climb mountains thread]



Status
Not open for further replies.
S

Srod

Guest
M

Mikael Seierup

Guest
"Bill B" <[email protected]> skrev i en meddelelse
news:[email protected]...
> While reading and visiting the links listed on the thread "Does it climb mountains" I saw this pic
> of a 1930s three speed lwb uss .View it at
> http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/anton/recumbent-pics/schottland02.jpg doesn't look to different
> from the uss lwb bents of today

A bit murky but it looks like a "Kingston"-recumbent from 1934-35. Built by a F.H. Grubb and
advertised as the first british recumbent by him. (The Recumbent Bicycle p. 21)

Mikael
 
J

John Riley

Guest
Looks like it might be the "Kingston" from frame builder F.H. Grubb in the UK (possibly "schottland"
;-) Bike was sold in 1934-35, according to Gunnar Fehlau's book.

John Riley

Bill B wrote:
>
> While reading and visiting the links listed on the thread "Does it climb mountains" I saw this pic
> of a 1930s three speed lwb uss .View it at
> http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/anton/recumbent-pics/schottland02.jpg doesn't look to different
> from the uss lwb bents of today
 
J

John Riley

Guest
srod wrote:
>
> Wonder if the Avatar was a knockoff of this bike? Avatar/Ryan/Longbikes frames show a definite
> family resemblance. Amazing.

I don't think they had any knowledge of it. Recumbents keep getting re-invented. The Avatar started
out as a SWB (Avatar 1000) and then got stretched into a LWB (Avatar 2000) because they thought it
worked better that way. The bike also suggests a USS TE, but again, I don't think there was any
knowledge of it. IIRC Gardner's inspiration was an upright tandem. IIRC he got a notion to pedal the
front pedals while sitting down low in back.

John Riley
 
P

Paul Bruneau

Guest
I have read that the Avatar designers had no knowledge of earlier 'bents.

srod wrote:
> Wonder if the Avatar was a knockoff of this bike? Avatar/Ryan/Longbikes frames show a definite
> family resemblance. Amazing.
>
> "Bill B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>
>>While reading and visiting the links listed on the thread "Does it climb mountains" I saw this pic
>>of a 1930s three speed lwb uss .View it at
>>http://www.complang.tuwien.ac.at/anton/recumbent-pics/schottland02.jpg doesn't look to different
>>from the uss lwb bents of today
>
 
M

Mikael Seierup

Guest
"John Riley" skrev...

> I don't think they had any knowledge of it. Recumbents keep getting re-invented. The Avatar
> started out as a SWB (Avatar 1000) and then got stretched into a LWB (Avatar 2000) because they
> thought it worked better that way. The bike also suggests a USS TE, but again, I don't think there
> was any knowledge of it. IIRC Gardner's inspiration was an upright tandem. IIRC he got a notion to
> pedal the front pedals while sitting down low in back.

Theres also the american Brown-recumbent from 1901 that has OSS and looks a bit like an Easy Racer.
It was even put together from two diamondframes as the early homemade TE's. Still I agree that
recumbents keep getting reinvented. Some constructor later in the book (The Recumbent Bicycle)
states that had he known what had already been built before, he could have saved himself a lot of
trial and error.

Regards Mikael
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Yep, that's a Freddie Grubb "Kingston" all right. See also
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/nkilgariff/FreddieGrubb.htm

I imagine the "Schottland" refers to the fact that the machine now resides in the Glasgow Museum Of
Transport, as Grubb was based in London.

Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
===========================================================
Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
===========================================================
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads