1980's era Campag Crankset and other questions

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Leaper, Jun 20, 2003.

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  1. Leaper

    Leaper Guest

    I'm working on a late 1980's Basso that has a Campagnolo Victory (I think?) gruppo. I would like to
    remove the cranks, but but I wanted to double-check their removal. There is a crank bolt requiring a
    7mm hex, and an outer ring with 2 holes. Do I need to remove the outer ring prior to the bolt? I
    have a couple of pin spanners, one's a Park tool, the other unknown, but the pins on these tools are
    too large to fit the holes in the ring. I can back the bolt out about a full turn, but then there is
    increased resistance and I didn't want to strip anything.

    I believe that this is a Victory gruppo from the picture on the campyonly site, there are no
    markings on any component except for the Campagnolo stampings. The rear derailluer has white (well,
    off-white now) pulleys. Was Victory positioned below Record, and then replaced by Chorus?

    Are there any "gotchas" you can share with me before I start - I was just planning to clean and
    repack the bottom bracket, hubs, etc - the headset need to be replaced and replace the pads, cables
    and housing.

    TIA -

    - gloria
     
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  2. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    Campy Victory and Triomphe were very similar in appearance and were only around for a year or two. Triomphe was the lowest priced with Victory slightly higher. Nuovo Record and Super Record were the next groups up and had already been established. I bought my first racing bike, an Italian Ciocc with Triomphe, for $700 in 1985, a Super Record bike would probably have been $1200. It wasn't a direct replacement but Athena pretty much took over in that (Victory) price range a few years later.

    Crank removal involved unscrewing the dust cap with an allen wrench, taking out the crank bolt from the spindle with about a 15mm special box end wrench, and then screwing in the crank puller.

    I'm not sure what your 7mm bolt is for but it sounds like the rings you mention are actually for the bottom bracket adjustable cup. You'd have to remove them to repack the bottom bracket but they have nothing to do with the crank removal.
     
  3. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    Update - after looking at those photos I see Triomphe had a dustcap but Victory looks like it had some kind of self-extracting bolt. Sorry.
     
  4. Harris

    Harris Guest

    " Leaper" wrote:
    > I'm working on a late 1980's Basso that has a Campagnolo Victory (I
    think?)
    > gruppo. I would like to remove the cranks, but but I wanted to
    double-check
    > their removal. There is a crank bolt requiring a 7mm hex, and an outer
    ring
    > with 2 holes.

    This sounds like a self-extracting system. Is the "outer ring with 2 holes" a dustcap? If so, it is
    left in place while the hex bolt is unscrewed. The bolt pushing against the dustcap forces the crank
    off the spindle. At least that's how Shimano systems work.

    > Are there any "gotchas" you can share with me before I start?

    If you end up using a conventional crank remover tool, make sure you remove the washer under the
    crank bolt before installing the extractor!

    Art Harris
     
  5. Those are the infamous Campagnolo self extracting bolts. All you need is a 7mm allen wrench. As you
    unscrew the bolts, the cranks come off as well. The outer two pin holes are to remove the extractors
    from the crank. If you want to remove the extractors, the threads in the crank are left handed, so
    be careful. The extractors have been known to strip out, so go slow. It's best to replace them with
    conventional bolts, but you cannot put covers back on due to the LH threads. You will also need a LH
    extractor tool if you don't reuse the extractor bolts.

    Incidentally, Triomphe had bolts & covers, Victory had the self extractors.

    "Harris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > " Leaper" wrote:
    > > I'm working on a late 1980's Basso that has a Campagnolo Victory (I
    > think?)
    > > gruppo. I would like to remove the cranks, but but I wanted to
    > double-check
    > > their removal. There is a crank bolt requiring a 7mm hex, and an outer
    > ring
    > > with 2 holes.
    >
    > This sounds like a self-extracting system. Is the "outer ring with 2
    holes"
    > a dustcap? If so, it is left in place while the hex bolt is unscrewed. The bolt pushing against
    > the dustcap forces the crank off the spindle. At
    least
    > that's how Shimano systems work.
    >
    > > Are there any "gotchas" you can share with me before I start?
    >
    > If you end up using a conventional crank remover tool, make sure you
    remove
    > the washer under the crank bolt before installing the extractor!
    >
    > Art Harris
     
  6. On Fri, 20 Jun 2003 19:19:13 +0000, Leaper wrote:

    > I'm working on a late 1980's Basso that has a Campagnolo Victory (I think?) gruppo. I would like
    > to remove the cranks, but but I wanted to double-check their removal. There is a crank bolt
    > requiring a 7mm hex, and an outer ring with 2 holes. Do I need to remove the outer ring prior to
    > the bolt?

    No. If by some miracle the self-extractors are still working properly, you can leave them in. Mine
    broke, but that is another story.

    I have
    > a couple of pin spanners, one's a Park tool, the other unknown, but the pins on these tools are
    > too large to fit the holes in the ring. I can back the bolt out about a full turn, but then there
    > is increased resistance and I didn't want to strip anything.

    That's just the self-extractor engaging.
    >
    > I believe that this is a Victory gruppo from the picture on the campyonly site, there are no
    > markings on any component except for the Campagnolo stampings. The rear derailluer has white
    > (well, off-white now) pulleys. Was Victory positioned below Record, and then replaced by Chorus?

    Well, Victory was certainly below Record. But all these names are designed to cloud what
    replaces what.

    >
    > Are there any "gotchas" you can share with me before I start - I was just planning to clean and
    > repack the bottom bracket, hubs, etc - the headset need to be replaced and replace the pads,
    > cables and housing.

    All I know about are the cranks, and there are two serious "gotchas" with them. One: Those
    chainrings are irreplacable, which is a RPITA since chainrings do wear out. The bolt-circle is I
    believe 113mm or thereabouts. Two: if you want/need to remove the self-extracting bolt assemblies,
    be forewarned that the threads on the outer part are left-hand. This has implications for removing
    the thing, first off, and also you CANNOT use standard crank-extrator tools to pull the crank if the
    self-extracting bolt is removed. Campy did make a special left-hand thread tool for these, but I am
    sure those will be scarce.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and _`\(,_ | Excellence. (_)/ (_) |
     
  7. Dave Mayer

    Dave Mayer Guest

    Campy Victory cranks had a 7mm hex self-extractor. If it isn't broken, then leave it alone. Yes, it
    is 7mm. Many I've seen have been stripped by mechanics trying to use a 6mm or a closest english
    equivalent. Buy a 7mm hex insert for a 3/8" drive socket set. Finding a 7mm Allen key is near
    impossible. Besides, using an Allen key for crank extractors simply doesn't provide enough leverage.
    Remove the crank by rotating the extractor bolt clockwise (tightening).

    Second: the crank extractor threads are left-handed on both sides. If you decide to remove the
    extactors, then you should be prepared with a Campagnolo left-hand crank extractor tool.

    Victory is pretty good stuff. It was around from the mid 80's to the early 90's. The bolt circle is
    116mm. This allows as low as a 35 tooth chainring. I have constructed Victory triple cranksets using
    a 35/42/52 using extra long chainring bolts and an extra set of spacers. It's a nice setup.

    BTW: I also have a last generation Victory crankset and I believe the crank extractors are
    right-hand thread.

    " Leaper" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm working on a late 1980's Basso that has a Campagnolo Victory (I
    think?)
    > gruppo. I would like to remove the cranks, but but I wanted to
    double-check
    > their removal. There is a crank bolt requiring a 7mm hex, and an outer
    ring
    > with 2 holes. Do I need to remove the outer ring prior to the bolt? I
    have
    > a couple of pin spanners, one's a Park tool, the other unknown, but the
    pins
    > on these tools are too large to fit the holes in the ring. I can back the bolt out about a full
    > turn, but then there is increased resistance and I didn't want to strip anything.
    >
    > I believe that this is a Victory gruppo from the picture on the campyonly site, there are no
    > markings on any component except for the Campagnolo stampings. The rear derailluer has white
    > (well, off-white now) pulleys. Was Victory positioned below Record, and then replaced by Chorus?
    >
    > Are there any "gotchas" you can share with me before I start - I was just planning to clean and
    > repack the bottom bracket, hubs, etc - the headset need to be replaced and replace the pads,
    > cables and housing.
    >
    > TIA -
    >
    > - gloria
     
  8. Leaper

    Leaper Guest

    Thanks for all the replies. Indeed, the 7mm bolt was a self-extracting crank bolt. The cranks are
    reverse-threaded, my crank-extractor tool that had served so well through the years would not have
    worked if I had forced off that ring. It was fun to pull out my older tools that haven't seen the
    light of day for a few years now - the crank-extractor, lockring tool, spanner, headset wrenches,
    and offset brake bolt wrench. I did have to buy a new freewheel tool - and I thought I owned just
    about all of those. Oh, I do have a set of metric hex keys in 3/8" sockets (Sears Craftsman) which
    are really handy for applying the proper torque as well as busting free the tight bolts.

    Not having owned a Campagnolo-equipped bike until a couple years ago, I never bought any specific
    tools for their components. I now own the bottom bracket tool, and the chain tool (yeah, really nice
    paper weight thanks to the Connex links ).

    Thanks again for the quick responses and history.

    - gloria

    Longest day of the year - whohoo! time to ride!
     
  9. Leaper-<< late 1980's Basso that has a Campagnolo Victory (I think?) gruppo. I would like to remove
    the cranks, but but I wanted to double-check their removal. There is a crank bolt requiring a 7mm
    hex, and an outer ring with 2 holes. Do I need to remove the outer ring prior to the bolt?
    >><BR><BR>

    This is a self extractor, just use a 7mm allen and lefty-loosey.

    Also the bolt hole is left threaded...use a left threaded crank puller(Campagnolo) to remove if the
    self extractor bolt/plate is off.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  10. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    " Leaper" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm working on a late 1980's Basso that has a Campagnolo Victory (I
    think?)
    > gruppo. I would like to remove the cranks, but but I wanted to
    double-check
    > their removal. There is a crank bolt requiring a 7mm hex, and an outer
    ring
    > with 2 holes. Do I need to remove the outer ring prior to the bolt? I
    have
    > a couple of pin spanners, one's a Park tool, the other unknown, but the
    pins
    > on these tools are too large to fit the holes in the ring. I can back the bolt out about a full
    > turn, but then there is increased resistance and I didn't want to strip anything.
    >
    > I believe that this is a Victory gruppo from the picture on the campyonly site, there are no
    > markings on any component except for the Campagnolo stampings. The rear derailluer has white
    > (well, off-white now) pulleys. Was Victory positioned below Record, and then replaced by Chorus?
    >
    > Are there any "gotchas" you can share with me before I start - I was just planning to clean and
    > repack the bottom bracket, hubs, etc - the headset need to be replaced and replace the pads,
    > cables and housing.

    The system you have is Campagnolo's version of Autex or One-Key. Shoot some heavily-bodied oil under
    the ring with two holes and around the 7mm allen key bolt. Unscrew the crank bolt. Your arm will
    slip right off.

    If you need or want to subvert that system and remove the steel cover ring with the two holes, use
    the Record cover plate remover with two pegs. It fits all Campagnolo models.

    http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/AUTEX.JPG

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
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