1980's? Schwinn Traveler

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by phiggins, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. phiggins

    phiggins New Member

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    I just bought this bike and I am looking to find out more info about it. I think that it is an '84 but I am not completely sure. It measures 23 inches. This bike is in amazing condition and rides equally well.

    If the bike is worth some cash I will go ahead and sell it, once I know more about it of course. If it is not worth too much, then I will keep it and ride it occasionally (a Sunday driver!).

    Anyhow, I would appreciate any info that someone might have on it.

    Thanks a bunch.
     
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  2. phiggins

    phiggins New Member

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    I am having trouble uploading the photos.
     
  3. phiggins

    phiggins New Member

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    The photos are up.
     
  4. phiggins

    phiggins New Member

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    Okay, I have made some progress on my own. On the bottom there are numbers reading G0184. These mean: Giant January, 1984. Apparently, Giant is the name of the Taiwanese company that Schwinn outsourced production to.
     
  5. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    The components, graphics, and sticker are a lot like my World Sport, except I didn't get downtube shifters. I think it's an '84 because some of the components like the brake levers said "84", and the bottom of the two part Schwinn logo is pink. Mens bikes wouldn't have been pink before the Miami Vice TV show and it was out of style after the mid 80s.

    I don't think these bikes are highly sought after. The frame is a good solid frame but it was built by Giant in Taiwan, not Schwinn, and is identical to other lower mid-range bikes of the era like Free Spirit. (edit: oops, beat me to it. O.P. added a blurb about Giant while I was typing.)

    The main tubes may be made of good steel but it seems not to have led to a much lighter or sweet-riding bike.

    The components are solid and durable. I doubt they have any collector interest, though.

    You can still get good tires in 27".

    The frame has less top tube length than a modern bike would. You can't get low as easily or as comfortably as you can on a modern bike but it is more comfortable for long trips because you're not reaching forward as far. I have done a half century and a century on mine and my shoulders were not sore at all.
     
  6. phiggins

    phiggins New Member

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    Thanks for your insight. I really appreciate it.
     
  7. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    I am assuming they don't have any collector interest. They might, of course.
     
  8. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Well, if the question is whether you got a steal, without knowing how much you paid, you probably did ... but, you didn't find an 'ANTIQUES ROAD SHOW' treasure that is worth thousands.

    Basically, if you paid under $100, then you would be hard pressed to find another bike in apparently comparable condition for similar money ... but, that doesn't mean that you would be able to sell it for more.

    If you wanted to buy a new, comparably 'nice' steel frameset (sans components), you would probably have to pay several hundred, but that doesn't mean that you would be able to sell the frame for that much.

    I would either keep it & ride it as-is OR use it as the foundation for an updated bike with contemporary, indexed shifting (which you could do for under $300 if you are a wise shopper & do the work yourself) since the frame apparently is close to the right size for you based on the saddle height relative to the top tube.
     
  9. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Putting a little money into maintenance would be an equally good solution vs. upgrading. Everything on the bike is still replaceable as well as upgradable, so go ahead and ride it and wear it out.

    I would get the wheels straightened by a shop; the previous owner may not have done it. Once you do it one time, they will stay true for a long time. I would also ensure all the bearings were properly lubed; I have seen old stored bikes' grease separate into a waxy substance (& the oil creeps out of the grease onto the frame or wheel hub where it collects dust).
     
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