1990 105 brake barrel adjuster advice

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by simonboyce, Mar 4, 2017.

  1. simonboyce

    simonboyce New Member

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    I have a 1990 Cannondale with 105. The barrel adjusters on both brakes are seized. Does anyone know if these are a standard size or what I would replace them with? Thanks. S
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Can't say straight off what size yours are. I've come across 2-3 different. I'd start with removing the brakes from the bike and give the adjusters a good soak in the penetrating oil of your choice.
    Easiest approach might be to get some in-line barrel adjusters, install and be done.
    Or ask around at a shop for some donor brakes, get adjusters from there.
     
  3. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Kroil Oil. Try it.
     
  4. simonboyce

    simonboyce New Member

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  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    The threading on most barrel adjusters found on brake calipers are a standard size -- Campagnolo barrel adjusters have a FLAT surface on the shaft and the receiving hole is not threaded -- but, to replace the barrel adjusters with another set means that you have to remove the old ones ... if you can remove the old barrel adjusters, then they will essentially be functional ...

    Inline barrel adjuster generally have a smaller size thread.​

    While removing the calipers from the bike AND brake pads from the calipers and then soaking them in some light oil is the best option ...

    If you aren't in a hurry OR you don't feel like removing the brake calipers from the frame-and-fork, then you can simply seep a drop-or-two of regular "household" oil (e.g., 3-in-1) onto the threads ... come back in 24 hours ... test ... wipe off any excess & repeat until loosened enough to turn-and-adjust.
    BTW. If your bike has clearance for fenders, then you can replace the brakes with some LONG REACH brake calipers (formally known as "normal" reach -- generally, a reach of 49mm-59mm).
     
  6. simonboyce

    simonboyce New Member

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    I'll try that, thanks.

    The advantage of longer reach breaks is increased stopping power? I doubt they would fit on my Cannondale (1990 SR600) which was designed, I think, as a racing bike, though I'm not using it for that...

     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    THE FOLLOWING IS NOT DEFINITIVE ...

    I am not certain how much more leverage there is with calipers which are now considered to be LONG REACH ...

    The arms on many OLDER brake calipers where comparatively flexy compared to the arms on many modern brake calipers ... so, what used do be considered to be a "short" reach brake caliper had arms which flexed a little less ... THAT + the rise of weight weenies almost ensured that "short" reach brakes would become the norm. The preceding reasons and the fact that the trend was for Road bikes which did-or-could-not use fenders made the old "normal" reach caliper the odd-man-out and by comparison they are now the current "long" reach caliper ...

    Regardless, the frame-and-fork typically dictate the "reach" for the calipers which are being used.

    The "reach" is often cast-or-"stamped" on the back/("flat") side of one of the caliper arms ...

    OR, you can simply measure from the CENTER of the mounting hole in the frame-or-fork down to the center of the rim's contact surface to determine the "reach" you will want a "new" seet of calipers to have.​

    Newer calipers (arbitrarily, post-1998) which are "dual-pivot" tend to provide both better braking AND better modulation.

    Shimano brake calipers are considered by many to be the best ...

    I use both Shimano & Campagnolo calipers ...

    But, I have found that some old-style (late-90s), single pivot Dia-Compe worked very well, too.

    Tektro brake calipers s which LOOK like copies of Shimano brake calipers are generally a good value.​

    YOUR current brakes may simply need new pads + lubrication ...

    Others may disagree, but I feel that LUBING the portion of the brake cable which passes through any housing may-or-may-not greatly enhance the responsiveness which a set of brakes have EVEN IF the (new-or-old) housing is theoretically pre-lubricated. .


     
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