1991 Raleigh Chill & Suspension fork Installation?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Mark W. Everly, May 25, 2003.

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  1. Hello Guys!

    How about some advise for an old guy! I've got an '91 Chill that I'd like to add a suspension fork
    too. The bike is mint (500 miles) so getting a new one just now ain't an option with the wife. Bike
    shop says it isn't worth it (they might be right).

    First, can I tell form the outside whether I need a 1" or 1 1/8" threadless headset? How hard is
    it to do this once I get all the parts I need? Any and all advise appreciated. Don't hold back, I
    can take it!

    Thanks in advance!

    Mark
     
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  2. Andy Chequer

    Andy Chequer Guest

    "Mark W. Everly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hello Guys!
    >
    > How about some advise for an old guy! I've got an '91 Chill that I'd like to add a suspension fork
    > too. The bike is mint (500 miles) so getting a new one just now ain't an option with the wife.
    > Bike shop says it isn't worth it (they might be right).

    I would agree with them, sorry. A lot of elderly MTBs were not designed with suspension forks in
    mind, and installing one can bring the height of the front end up so high that it makes for
    rather slow ponderous handling. In any case, the rigid fork it already should be stiff and
    maintainance free.

    Kind of depends what you want to do with the bike. If you want to ride smooth trails and roads, then
    suspension is a bit overkill anyway - maybe consider thicker grips and/or better gloves to remove
    the sting. On the other hand, if you want to get more adventurous with it then save the pennies for
    a newer MTB (competency has never been so cheap IME).

    > First, can I tell form the outside whether I need a 1" or 1 1/8" threadless headset? How hard is
    > it to do this once I get all the parts I need? Any and all advise appreciated. Don't hold back, I
    > can take it!
    >
    > Thanks in advance!

    At this age I would have thought that it would have a 1" headset, but to measure it you could use a
    take the stem off it and measure across the steerer tube with a ruler (measuring the outside
    diameter of the tube). Any competent bike mechanic should be able to tell you at a glance.

    By the time you've managed to get hold of a 1" threadless suspension fork, new stem and headset,
    you've thrown a lot of money at an old bike.

    Andy Chequer
     
  3. Bruce Pech

    Bruce Pech Guest

    "Andy Chequer" <[email protected](youdontwantthisbitinit)thisisasparagus.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mark W. Everly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hello Guys!
    > >
    > > How about some advise for an old guy! I've got an '91 Chill that I'd like to add a suspension
    > > fork too. The bike is mint (500 miles) so getting a new one just now ain't an option with the
    > > wife. Bike shop says it isn't worth it (they might be right).
    >
    > I would agree with them, sorry. A lot of elderly MTBs were not designed
    with
    > suspension forks in mind, and installing one can bring the height of the front end up so high that
    > it makes for rather slow ponderous handling. In any case, the rigid fork it already should be
    > stiff and maintainance free.
    >
    > Kind of depends what you want to do with the bike. If you want to ride smooth trails and roads,
    > then suspension is a bit overkill anyway - maybe consider thicker grips and/or better gloves to
    > remove the sting. On the other hand, if you want to get more adventurous with it then save the
    > pennies for a newer MTB (competency has never been so cheap IME).
    >
    > > First, can I tell form the outside whether I need a 1" or 1 1/8" threadless headset? How hard is
    > > it to do this once I get all the parts I need? Any and all advise appreciated. Don't hold back,
    > > I can take it!
    > >
    > > Thanks in advance!
    >
    > At this age I would have thought that it would have a 1" headset, but to measure it you could use
    > a take the stem off it and measure across the steerer tube with a ruler (measuring the outside
    > diameter of the tube).
    Any
    > competent bike mechanic should be able to tell you at a glance.
    >
    > By the time you've managed to get hold of a 1" threadless suspension fork, new stem and headset,
    > you've thrown a lot of money at an old bike.
    >
    > Andy Chequer

    I agree with Andy. Spent a lot of $$ upgrading my wife's '95, rigid-fork Cannondale M400. But now
    that she's retiring and has more time to ride, we've decided that it's way too heavy and are
    investing a lot more $$$ in a new, light-weight hardtail. However, if you don't have any other
    options and really want a suspension fork, you'll probably have to custom order one from a Marzocchi
    dealer. Unlike RockShox, Manitou, etc., Marzocchi will equip some models with 1" steel steerer
    tubes. 1" threadless headsets are easier to come by -- the Ritchey Logic, for example.

    Bruce Pech
     
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