2 weeks to hell

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Whatever, Jul 20, 2003.

  1. Whatever

    Whatever Guest

    Hi there. I'm soon to do my first triathlon. I got in to this after having a silly conversation with
    two friends down the pub and about 2 months later I find myself entered for the London Triathlon in
    the Olympic mixed category.

    I've been training. Well, I've swam about 1200-1500m twice a week and have been doing 6-8k hill runs
    3 times a week and the odd bike ride. I don't feel at all prepared though. Any tips on what I can do
    in these last two weeks to give myself a chance of finishing?

    ...and before you mention it, the moral of the story is that you should NEVER make any decisions
    at the pub.

    Ta,

    Adam
     
    Tags:


  2. John Hardt

    John Hardt Guest

    On 7/20/03 5:09 AM, in article, "whatever" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi there. I'm soon to do my first triathlon. I got in to this after having a silly conversation
    > with two friends down the pub and about 2 months later I find myself entered for the London
    > Triathlon in the Olympic mixed category.
    >
    > I've been training. Well, I've swam about 1200-1500m twice a week and have been doing 6-8k hill
    > runs 3 times a week and the odd bike ride. I don't feel at all prepared though. Any tips on what I
    > can do in these last two weeks to give myself a chance of finishing?
    >
    > ...and before you mention it, the moral of the story is that you should NEVER make any decisions
    > at the pub.
    >
    > Ta,
    >
    > Adam

    Adam,

    The question of whether you can finish this race has already been determined since no one can
    achieve any significant fitness gains in two weeks. Your best bet is to continue with your current
    program for one more week, then take it easy the week before the race (possibly cutting your usual
    training in half or more). Take the two days before the race off completely.

    Being rested on race day is far more important than anything else you can do at this point. Trying
    to cram in extra workouts or extra miles will only reduce your ability to perform on race day.

    Most importantly: relax and remember it's supposed to be fun.
     
  3. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (whatever) wrote:

    > Hi there. I'm soon to do my first triathlon. I got in to this after having a silly conversation
    > with two friends down the pub and about 2 months later I find myself entered for the London
    > Triathlon in the Olympic mixed category.
    >
    > I've been training. Well, I've swam about 1200-1500m twice a week and have been doing 6-8k hill
    > runs 3 times a week and the odd bike ride. I don't feel at all prepared though. Any tips on what I
    > can do in these last two weeks to give myself a chance of finishing?
    >
    > ...and before you mention it, the moral of the story is that you should NEVER make any decisions
    > at the pub.
    >
    > Ta,
    >
    > Adam

    OK, i am far from being an expert, but just yesterday i completed my first sprint triathlon. you
    don't mention your race distances, but if they are anything like what you are doing in training, you
    should be fine. you're a decent-to-good swimmer? have you been running prior to this "pub decision"?
    a guy i met at my race told me he decided the NIGHT BEFORE to do the race. he was a good swimmer to
    begin with, had been cycling lots for years, and was just a bit weak on the run. he finished with no
    problems.... ahead of me (he's the far better swimmer).

    so just keep training, ease off on the week of the race, and you'll collect your bet money :) (that
    IS what this is about, right?)

    best of luck,

    Cam

    --
    Not every race can be a perfect experience, but every race can be a learning experience.
     
  4. hmmm at this stage not much difference you can make other than tiring yourself out!!

    But if you have your wetsuit (hired I guess) you might like to practice swimming in it so you're
    used to it. Yes you'll look daft in the local pool and yes you'll get too hot there, but it's one
    less "weird" thing to worry about on the day.

    If you can get to some open water for a swim practice even better.....but don't swim alone!

    "whatever" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi there. I'm soon to do my first triathlon. I got in to this after having a silly conversation
    > with two friends down the pub and about 2 months later I find myself entered for the London
    > Triathlon in the Olympic mixed category.
    >
    > I've been training. Well, I've swam about 1200-1500m twice a week and have been doing 6-8k hill
    > runs 3 times a week and the odd bike ride. I don't feel at all prepared though. Any tips on what I
    > can do in these last two weeks to give myself a chance of finishing?
    >
    > ...and before you mention it, the moral of the story is that you should NEVER make any decisions
    > at the pub.
    >
    > Ta,
    >
    > Adam
     
  5. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

  6. Cajunman

    Cajunman Guest

    if your swim training has been pool training & the tri swim is open water, you might want to do an
    open water swim just to know what to expect. open water swimming is a bit different from pool
    swimming. CAJUNMAN
     
  7. Dingo

    Dingo Guest

    Overall
    1. Lose the "to hell" attitude... it's just an event. Thousands of folks do these all the time and
    have a blast. Relax and enjoy the experience.
    2. Hopefully you didn't bet on time. See above ref relaxing and enjoying... Race morning:
    - Review and situate your stuff so you can find it when you come out of the water and get yourself
    sorted out in some logical fashion (place to put your swim googles, place where your biking stuff
    is, place where your running stuff is...)
    - Remember where your transition spot is!
    - Listen to the pre-race brief Swim
    - The start of a triathlon swim is like swimming in a blender... don't get stressed out. Yes, there
    are a million people, yes they are swimming all over and over top of you... it will be ok.
    Normally the field stretches out and becomes more relaxed after about 400 or 500 meters. Don't let
    the start get to you
    - Start to the side of the pack or let the pack leave by 15 or 20 seconds if you want to avoid above
    - Look up while swimming to spot your markers / buoys often... swimming off the course makes for a
    longer day
    - Relax coming out the water. Focus on what you need to do to get ready for the bike so you already
    have visualized your transition Bike
    - Put on and fasten your helmet / put on and fasten your helmet / put on and snap your fasten
    - Don't be a "Fred" (no offense to the Fredericks of the world - it's a roadie term)... ride to the
    side, don't draft, don't cross the yellow center line
    - Drink on the bike.. odds are that you'll be on the bike for a while, so use that time to
    get hydrated
    - Think about your transition to the run, relax and enjoy the countryside Run
    - You're legas will feel like spaghetti noodles for the first couple of miles - no worries, everyone
    else is feeling the same. You'll settle down and get your legs back
    - Relax your stride - stretch your legs easily in the early part of the run so you can bring up the
    pace in the 2nd half if you need to or want to
    - Focus on finishing and being able to bragg at the pub (again) that night!

    Afterwards: (1) watch the bets you make at the pub (2) let us know how it went All the best, Dingo
     
  8. Hi. Some suggestions. Plan to do intervals in your race including walking in the running part. Start
    off a few seconds later in the swim and try to save energy there focusing on gettting through. If
    you plan on doing intervals in the bike and run, you won't emotionally drain yourself when you
    resort to this but instead will have a good time, I hope.

    -----------------
    Hi there. I'm soon to do my first triathlon. I got in to this after having a silly conversation with
    two friends down the pub and about 2 months later I find myself entered for the London Triathlon in
    the Olympic mixed category.

    I've been training. Well, I've swam about 1200-1500m twice a week and have been doing 6-8k hill runs
    3 times a week and the odd bike ride. I don't feel at all prepared though. Any tips on what I can do
    in these last two weeks to give myself a chance of finishing?

    ...and before you mention it, the moral of the story is that you should NEVER make any decisions
    at the pub.

    Ta,

    Adam
     
  9. Whatever

    Whatever Guest

    Hi all, Thanks for your comments! I found them all very encouraging really.

    I think that I'll be able finish it because so far I've managed to finish a 1.5k swim in about
    40minutes, cycle 21k in an hour and run a hilly 10kish in 40 mins or so. Its an Olympic triathlon
    and yes, I haven't really put these together yet, but the times are okish and they give me hope.

    Your comments on not killing myself in the last two weeks and also about trying to enjoy the race
    have allowed me to feel a bit more positive too. Thanks.

    I was wondering about the transitions though. Is it better to give yourself a little rest (2 mins or
    something) or to get on to the next stage quickly so as not to lose your momentum?

    Secondly, I don't think that I'll be able to swim the whole 1.5k front crawl and will have to resort
    to breast stroke. Do you think it would be best to just do breast stroke when I tire from crawl, or
    would it be best to do 100 strokes crawl and 20 breast from the start so as to pace myself?

    Lastly, how am I going to stop myself gulping down that yukky river water?!

    Thanks, you're all stars. Will keep you updated no doubt.

    Adam
     
  10. whatever wrote: <snippage>
    >
    > I was wondering about the transitions though. Is it better to give yourself a little rest (2 mins
    > or something) or to get on to the next stage quickly so as not to lose your momentum?

    For your first time, take it easy in the transition. The swim to bike one (Transition 1 or T1) can
    be hard because you might be woozy. Transition 2 (T2) can be very hard too, because your legs are
    very used to the bicycle motion and the running motion can make your legs feel funky. I wouldn't say
    'rest', but make sure you get your shoes on properly, make sure you've got your hat, glasses, water,
    whatever with you etc.

    >
    > Secondly, I don't think that I'll be able to swim the whole 1.5k front crawl and will have to
    > resort to breast stroke. Do you think it would be best to just do breast stroke when I tire
    > from crawl, or would it be best to do 100 strokes crawl and 20 breast from the start so as to
    > pace myself?

    You may find your second option to be the best, not simply from the point of view of fatigue, but in
    making sure you're going the right direction in open water.

    >
    > Lastly, how am I going to stop myself gulping down that yukky river water?!

    You aren't :) You're going to swallow some, it's virutally inevitable. Just try not to
    swallow too much.

    --

    Cheers,

    Walter R. Strapps, Ph.D

    "The sheer closeness of our two countries and the intensity of our mutual interaction combined with
    the disparity between us in terms of wealth and power--all these things guarantee there will be
    problems in U.S.-Canadian relations without anybody having to do anything to deliberately worsen the
    situation."

    Robert L. Stanfield, Oct. 28, 1971
     
  11. "whatever" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Secondly, I don't think that I'll be able to swim the whole 1.5k front crawl and will have to
    > resort to breast stroke. Do you think it would be best to just do breast stroke when I tire
    > from crawl, or would it be best to do 100 strokes crawl and 20 breast from the start so as to
    > pace myself?

    If you wind up doing breast stroke, I suggest you pick a line that is a little outside of the
    traffic. Most triathletes (at least the ones who don't do it) do not really like to see people doing
    breast stroke. The reason is that the kick extends out to the side of your body, making highly
    likely you will kick the person passing you (which will almost certainly happen when you switch from
    freestyle unless you are faster at the breast stroke than freestyle which is not likely).

    > Lastly, how am I going to stop myself gulping down that yukky river water?!

    Good luck with that. I've never competed in a race without sucking at least some water. You'll
    probalby take your first big gulp the first time you get kicked in the face.
     
  12. Cam Wilson

    Cam Wilson Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (whatever) wrote:

    > Hi all, Thanks for your comments! I found them all very encouraging really.
    >
    > I think that I'll be able finish it because so far I've managed to finish a 1.5k swim in about
    > 40minutes, cycle 21k in an hour and run a hilly 10kish in 40 mins or so. Its an Olympic triathlon
    > and yes, I haven't really put these together yet, but the times are okish and they give me hope.

    you can do it.

    the thing now is to do some "brick" workouts, where you do two of the sports back-to-back in
    training. i never bothered doing a swim to bike brick, but did many (once per week) bike to run
    bricks. this gets the body used to the feeling of coming off one discipline and into the next, and i
    tell you, you really feel strange doing the bike to run brick the first few times. but at least know
    how it'll feel, so it won't surprise you so much come race day. and to deal with the "lead legs",
    just do some leg (and back and hips) stretches while nearing the end of the bike. also do some
    spinning (high cadence pedaling) near the start and finish of the bike, to both ease into the bike
    and to cool down and prep for the run.

    > Your comments on not killing myself in the last two weeks and also about trying to enjoy the race
    > have allowed me to feel a bit more positive too. Thanks.
    >
    > I was wondering about the transitions though. Is it better to give yourself a little rest (2 mins
    > or something) or to get on to the next stage quickly so as not to lose your momentum?

    for the swim to bike transition, you'll take a minute or so to towel off your feet, pull on shoes
    and a helmet, so that'll give you a little rest. and really, the bike - at least the start of it -
    is a rest from the swim (your arms get a rest here). i feel that keeping moving is better than being
    still during a transition... keep the blood flowing and get it flowing to the new set of muscles
    that'll be used next.

    and bike to run should be seamless, IMO. just drop off the bike and helmet and GO. more
    fun that way!

    > Secondly, I don't think that I'll be able to swim the whole 1.5k front crawl and will have to
    > resort to breast stroke. Do you think it would be best to just do breast stroke when I tire
    > from crawl, or would it be best to do 100 strokes crawl and 20 breast from the start so as to
    > pace myself?

    i'm no expert in swimming, but if it were me - and it WAS me this past weekend - i'd do front crawl
    until you feel the need for a change, then do it. i did a tiny bit of breast stroke and even a
    little back crawl to catch my breath in my own race. but the more experienced swimmers here can
    advise better....

    > Lastly, how am I going to stop myself gulping down that yukky river water?!

    don't open yer mouth underwater :)

    > Thanks, you're all stars. Will keep you updated no doubt.

    looking forward to the race report, Adam. best of luck. nearly there.

    Cam

    --
    Not every race can be a perfect experience, but every race can be a learning experience.
     
  13. "whatever" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi all, Thanks for your comments! I found them all very encouraging really.
    >

    > Lastly, how am I going to stop myself gulping down that yukky river water?!
    >
    > Thanks, you're all stars. Will keep you updated no doubt.
    >
    > Adam

    Adam,

    I did the London swim in a relay team last year. The water is not that bad.....way less yukky than I
    expected. It's filtered when it enters the dock so I guess I lot of the gunk gets lost then. I
    inadvertently drank some last year and had no side effects (other than the enthusiasm to do another
    triathlon!!)

    Good luck, Hedgehog
     
  14. Dave

    Dave Guest

    A few points to remember if you are not familiar with triathlon events and there rules.

    1) Remember to fasten your helmet before un-racking your bike and keep it fastened until you have
    racked your bike.
    2) You must always have a top or shirt on for the bike and run section

    For other tips etc goto http://www.britishtriathlon.org/information/guide/index.php

    or

    www.clevelandtriathlon.co.uk

    have fun

    Dave cleveland Biketraks Tri club www.clevelandtriathlon.co.uk
     
  15. Whatever

    Whatever Guest

    Any views on what I should be eating in the week before the triathlon?

    Thanks,

    Adam
     
  16. Old Timer

    Old Timer Guest

    Yeah, food.

    Relax. Its only a short race. One small chunk of a couple of hours out of your life. Its great to be
    excited, but just a race, not a moon launch.

    Don't change your eating habits now - you could throw off your digestive system and wind up with the
    runs - which will dehydrate you and worse.
     
  17. Chris Maginn

    Chris Maginn Guest

    Keep the pints to a minimum tonight mate. Get some sleep. Drink a few extra glasses of water.

    Bangers and beer for breakfast.....AFTER the race.

    [email protected] (Old Timer) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Yeah, food.
    >
    > Relax. Its only a short race. One small chunk of a couple of hours out of your life. Its great to
    > be excited, but just a race, not a moon launch.
    >
    > Don't change your eating habits now - you could throw off your digestive system and wind up with
    > the runs - which will dehydrate you and worse.
     
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