2003 Gary Fisher Big Sur or Trek 8000



Jeff Edelen wrote:

> jem wrote:
>
>>
>> Had my Fuel 80 for two years. I did have problems early
>> on with a crappy seat and a chainring that bent, both of
>> which the dealer made better at no cost to me. Since then
>> I've had no problems and absolutley love the ride. Guess
>> that makes me another of the millions of statistical
>> anomolies.
>
>
> How much over two hundred pounds do you weigh?
>
> -Jeff
>

Unfortunately about 30.
 
Monique Y. Mudama <[email protected]> wrote:
> On 2004-07-03, Zilla penned:
>>
>> I'm 185-190 lbs and have had my Trek Fuel 90 for 3 yrs,
>> avg. riding 3-4 times a week 1-1.5 hrs each ride. I've
>> never paid attention to dew commercials either. It's
>> worked for me. I don't know, or care, if it'll work for
>> any one else. Nor do I care if what works for anyone will
>> work for me.
>
>... but I'm 100% sure that JD tackles trails (if you can
>even call them that) far more brutal than I'm likely to try
>in the next several years.

And if/when you/I do that then yes cookie cutter bikes may
not cut it.

>
> then again, I've been thinking it might be interesting
> (educational, anyway) to go hard tail ...
> --
> monique

Set up an SS. Ironically, JD suggested this 1.5-2 yrs. ago
when I asked what second bike I should get. Credit when and
where credit is due.

--
- Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)
 
I've been knocking myself out, but if you took the time to
read this you could at least offer some useful advice.

KR

P.S. - This is by far the most amount of reply posts I've
ever gotten to a Usenet post while still providing the
least amount of useful information. Is this typical of
this group?

"JD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> "KR" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > That's fine to tell me that I'm picking wrong, but how
> > it doesn't really help me unless you tell me what I
> > should buy and why?
> >
> > KR
>
> > > I'm saying they will fall apart under regular use by
> > > someone over two hundred pounds. My guess would be the
> > > wheels and/or freehub would fail first. The
> > > replacement of componentry will nickel and dime you to
> > > the point you wished you had bought a good bike. Both
> > > of those frames (as are most cookie-cutter frames) are
> > > designed and built cheaply because the manufacturers
> > > figure most of the "mountain bikes" they sell will not
> > > be used regularly. They bank on the fact that some
> > > dipstick is going to see a mt dew commercial, buy
> > > their bike, ride it once and then find out it's not as
> > > easy as it looks, so they put the bike in the garage
> > > or on eBay. Those bikes that do get used are factored
> > > in as a loss when they eventually get replaced under
> > > warranty. It's "business", which sucks because they
> > > (especially trek and fisher) sell bikes that are
> > > underdesigned and underbuilt for regular use by those
> > > who really want to mountain bike. How does waiting for
> > > a warranty replacement sound when the weather and
> > > trails are perfect?
> > >
> > > JD
>
> It's not too hard to figure out, so knock yourself out.
>
> JD
 
"Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I can't speak for you, but I'm 100% sure that JD tackles
> trails (if you can even call them that) far more brutal
> than I'm likely to try in the next several years.

It's not about how "brutal" a trail may be, it's about how
well you ride. Hacks will tear up a bicycle on the easiest
of trails. Handling skills save a bike just as much as the
quality of a bike does.

JD
 
jem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> Jeff Edelen wrote:
>
> > jem wrote:
> >
> >>
> >> Had my Fuel 80 for two years. I did have problems early
> >> on with a crappy seat and a chainring that bent, both
> >> of which the dealer made better at no cost to me. Since
> >> then I've had no problems and absolutley love the ride.
> >> Guess that makes me another of the millions of
> >> statistical anomolies.
> >
> >
> > How much over two hundred pounds do you weigh?
> >
> > -Jeff
> >
>
> Unfortunately about 30.

You still haven't completed the puzzle. Where do you ride?
How often do you ride? How many miles do you put in on an
average week on *singletrack*? What kind of conditions do
you ride in? Without those answers, your statement makes you
much less than a statistical anomaly. I wonder what would
happen to that trek if you rode The National on South
Mountain three times a week... What do you think Jeff?

JD
 
On 2004-07-04, JD penned:
> "Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in
> message
> news:<[email protected]>...
>> I can't speak for you, but I'm 100% sure that JD tackles
>> trails (if you can even call them that) far more brutal
>> than I'm likely to try in the next several years.
>
> It's not about how "brutal" a trail may be, it's about how
> well you ride. Hacks will tear up a bicycle on the easiest
> of trails. Handling skills save a bike just as much as the
> quality of a bike does.

This I believe, not to mention that more experienced riders
probably take better care of their bikes between rides, on
average. But I've never heard you express this angle on break-
prone bikes before.

--
monique
 
[email protected] (JD) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> "Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in
> message
> news:<[email protected]>...
> > I can't speak for you, but I'm 100% sure that JD tackles
> > trails (if you can even call them that) far more brutal
> > than I'm likely to try in the next several years.
>
> It's not about how "brutal" a trail may be, it's about how
> well you ride. Hacks will tear up a bicycle on the easiest
> of trails.

Like you and your Trek Y-Bike.

> Handling skills save a bike just as much as the quality of
> a bike does.

Like JD's Trek.
 
JD wrote:
> jem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<f8JFc.-
> [email protected]>...
>
>>Jeff Edelen wrote:
>>>
>>>How much over two hundred pounds do you weigh?
>>
>>Unfortunately about 30.
>
> You still haven't completed the puzzle. Where do you
> ride? How often do you ride? How many miles do you put in
> on an average week on *singletrack*? What kind of
> conditions do you ride in? Without those answers, your
> statement makes you much less than a statistical anomaly.
> I wonder what would happen to that trek if you rode The
> National on South Mountain three times a week... What do
> you think Jeff?

I was betting on the answer to my question being a
negative number. Personally, at 220 lbs, I wouldn't trust
a Liquid, much less a Fuel, as my regular-use trail bike.
I figure that I'm at least 25% heavier than the "average"
rider, and I'm not surprised by the idea that my bike
needs to be heavier, too. I also figure that trails like
National are somewhat rougher than the average (not to
mention low-end FS) XC bikes are designed to tackle. I'll
stick with my SuperMoto for rougher trail riding. For XC,
I really like my 1FG.

-Jeff
 
"KR" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> I've been knocking myself out, but if you took the time to
> read this you could at least offer some useful advice.

Try this really neato thing called "Google" and search this
newsgroup. I found the 2 year old post of Blaine's to repost
that video in about ten seconds. That's much less time than
I would have to take by sitting here and breast feeding you
the information.

JD
 
[email protected] (R.White) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> [email protected] (JD) wrote in message
> news:<[email protected]>...
> > "Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in
> > message
> > news:<[email protected]>...
> > > I can't speak for you, but I'm 100% sure that JD
> > > tackles trails (if you can even call them that) far
> > > more brutal than I'm likely to try in the next several
> > > years.
> >
> > It's not about how "brutal" a trail may be, it's about
> > how well you ride. Hacks will tear up a bicycle on the
> > easiest of trails.
>
> Like you and your Trek Y-Bike.
>
> > Handling skills save a bike just as much as the quality
> > of a bike does.
>
> Like JD's Trek.

The funniest thing about this leg hump is that you'll never
truly know how well or hackish I might ride, ricky. Thanks
for the starch.

http://bbauer.gomen.org/videos/idaho.wmv

JD
 
Jeff Edelen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<Qq3Gc.28574$WI2.755@lakeread05>...
> JD wrote:
> > jem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<f8JF-
> > [email protected]>...
> >
> >>Jeff Edelen wrote:
> >>>
> >>>How much over two hundred pounds do you weigh?
> >>
> >>Unfortunately about 30.
> >
> > You still haven't completed the puzzle. Where do you
> > ride? How often do you ride? How many miles do you put
> > in on an average week on *singletrack*? What kind of
> > conditions do you ride in? Without those answers, your
> > statement makes you much less than a statistical
> > anomaly. I wonder what would happen to that trek if you
> > rode The National on South Mountain three times a
> > week... What do you think Jeff?
>
> I was betting on the answer to my question being a
> negative number. Personally, at 220 lbs, I wouldn't trust
> a Liquid, much less a Fuel, as my regular-use trail bike.
> I figure that I'm at least 25% heavier than the "average"
> rider, and I'm not surprised by the idea that my bike
> needs to be heavier, too. I also figure that trails like
> National are somewhat rougher than the average (not to
> mention low-end FS) XC bikes are designed to tackle. I'll
> stick with my SuperMoto for rougher trail riding. For XC,
> I really like my 1FG.

Not neccessarily true on having a *heavier* bike for rougher
trails. I've ridden my 23lb singlespeed all over and I've
only broken a few components on it. The frame is still going
strong after over four years. A good xc frame will stand up
to regular use, even if you push the limits and are't
jumping off of **** over 3'. My Edge FS is still going
strong as well after 3 1/2 years and it only weighs 28 lbs.
I'd break one of those trek junkers within six months, no
doubt in my mind at all.

JD
 
> Not neccessarily true on having a *heavier* bike for
> rougher trails. I've ridden my 23lb singlespeed all over
> and I've only broken a few components on it. The frame is
> still going strong after over four years. A good xc frame
> will stand up to regular use, even if you push the limits
> and are't jumping off of **** over 3'. My Edge FS is still
> going strong as well after 3 1/2 years and it only weighs
> 28 lbs. I'd break one of those trek junkers within six
> months, no doubt in my mind at all.
>
> JD

What's your singlespeed frame?

--
Phil, Squid-in-Training
 
JD wrote:
> jem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<f8JFc.-
> [email protected]>...
>
>>Jeff Edelen wrote:
>>
>>
>>>jem wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Had my Fuel 80 for two years. I did have problems early
>>>>on with a crappy seat and a chainring that bent, both of
>>>>which the dealer made better at no cost to me. Since
>>>>then I've had no problems and absolutley love the ride.
>>>>Guess that makes me another of the millions of
>>>>statistical anomolies.
>>>
>>>
>>>How much over two hundred pounds do you weigh?
>>>
>>>-Jeff
>>>
>>
>>Unfortunately about 30.
>
>
> You still haven't completed the puzzle. Where do you
> ride? How often do you ride? How many miles do you put in
> on an average week on *singletrack*? What kind of
> conditions do you ride in? Without those answers, your
> statement makes you much less than a statistical anomaly.
> I wonder what would happen to that trek if you rode The
> National on South Mountain three times a week... What do
> you think Jeff?

Sure I have. I know that you're unlikely to admit that Trek
could make a good bike, even though they sell hundreds of
thousands of them each year. They do give warranties to
their frames, so it does pay to make them good. Something
about repeat business too, if your product truly sucks then
word will get around. Components wear out, no matter what
frame you hang them on. You probably get more for your buck
with a Trek then with any botique bike.

I only ride 3-4 times per week. Almost 100% N.C. single-
track. Plenty of root, rocks, logs and bumps, and I catch a
little air when I can. A typical ride may be anywhere from
3-11 miles, but I always feel like I've had a workout.
 
jem <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> I only ride 3-4 times per week. Almost 100% N.C. single-
> track.

Where in NC are you?

--
- Zilla Cary, NC (Remove XSPAM)
 
[email protected] (JD) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> [email protected] (R.White) wrote in message
> news:<[email protected]>...
> > [email protected] (JD) wrote in message news:<ebf270c9.04-
> > [email protected]>...
> > > "Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in
> > > message
> > > news:<[email protected]>...
> > > > I can't speak for you, but I'm 100% sure that JD
> > > > tackles trails (if you can even call them that) far
> > > > more brutal than I'm likely to try in the next
> > > > several years.
> > >
> > > It's not about how "brutal" a trail may be, it's about
> > > how well you ride. Hacks will tear up a bicycle on the
> > > easiest of trails.
> >
> > Like you and your Trek Y-Bike.
> >
> > > Handling skills save a bike just as much as the
> > > quality of a bike does.
> >
> > Like JD's Trek.
>
> The funniest thing about this leg hump is that you'll
> never truly know how well or hackish I might ride, ricky.
> Thanks for the starch.

Oh boo hoo, I'm not gonna get one of your lame "come out
here and I'll show you..." posts.

The funniest thing is how you contradict yourself.
 
Zilla wrote:
> jem <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>I only ride 3-4 times per week. Almost 100% N.C. single-
>>track.
>
>
> Where in NC are you?
>

Kernersville. Between Greensboro and Winston-Salem.
 
[email protected] (R.White) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> [email protected] (JD) wrote in message
> news:<[email protected]>...
> > [email protected] (R.White) wrote in message news:<27-
> > [email protected]>...
> > > [email protected] (JD) wrote in message news:<ebf270c9.-
> > > [email protected]>...
> > > > "Monique Y. Mudama" <[email protected]> wrote in
> > > > message
> > > > news:<[email protected]>...
> > > > > I can't speak for you, but I'm 100% sure that JD
> > > > > tackles trails (if you can even call them that)
> > > > > far more brutal than I'm likely to try in the next
> > > > > several years.
> > > >
> > > > It's not about how "brutal" a trail may be, it's
> > > > about how well you ride. Hacks will tear up a
> > > > bicycle on the easiest of trails.
> > >
> > > Like you and your Trek Y-Bike.
> > >
> > > > Handling skills save a bike just as much as the
> > > > quality of a bike does.
> > >
> > > Like JD's Trek.
> >
> > The funniest thing about this leg hump is that you'll
> > never truly know how well or hackish I might ride,
> > ricky. Thanks for the starch.
>
> Oh boo hoo, I'm not gonna get one of your lame "come out
> here and I'll show you..." posts.

I'm surprised at you, ricky. You seem to pay so much
attention to me and what I have to say, you might have
figured out by now that is not my normal mode of operation.
Vo2lker is just ignorant, whereas you are psychotic and
there's a big difference between the two.

> The funniest thing is how you contradict yourself.

Where? You need to get back on your meds.

JD
 
"ZeeExSixAre" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> > Not neccessarily true on having a *heavier* bike for
> > rougher trails. I've ridden my 23lb singlespeed all over
> > and I've only broken a few components on it. The frame
> > is still going strong after over four years. A good xc
> > frame will stand up to regular use, even if you push the
> > limits and are't jumping off of **** over 3'. My Edge FS
> > is still going strong as well after 3 1/2 years and it
> > only weighs 28 lbs. I'd break one of those trek junkers
> > within six months, no doubt in my mind at all.
> >
> > JD
>
>
> What's your singlespeed frame?

The Ritchie Blackmore Bike, a deep purple Edge Cycles Mango
SS.

JD
 
jem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> JD wrote:
> > jem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<f8JF-
> > [email protected]>...
> >
> >>Jeff Edelen wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>jem wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>Had my Fuel 80 for two years. I did have problems
> >>>>early on with a crappy seat and a chainring that bent,
> >>>>both of which the dealer made better at no cost to me.
> >>>>Since then I've had no problems and absolutley love
> >>>>the ride. Guess that makes me another of the millions
> >>>>of statistical anomolies.
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>How much over two hundred pounds do you weigh?
> >>>
> >>>-Jeff
> >>>
> >>
> >>Unfortunately about 30.
> >
> >
> > You still haven't completed the puzzle. Where do you
> > ride? How often do you ride? How many miles do you put
> > in on an average week on *singletrack*? What kind of
> > conditions do you ride in? Without those answers, your
> > statement makes you much less than a statistical
> > anomaly. I wonder what would happen to that trek if you
> > rode The National on South Mountain three times a
> > week... What do you think Jeff?
>
> Sure I have. I know that you're unlikely to admit that
> Trek could make a good bike, even though they sell
> hundreds of thousands of them each year. They do give
> warranties to their frames, so it does pay to make them
> good. Something about repeat business too, if your product
> truly sucks then word will get around. Components wear
> out, no matter what frame you hang them on.

Apparently you missed the fact that trek gambles on most
of their "mountain" bikes not getting used as a mountain
bike and expect a certain amount of write-off from
warranties on those bikes that do get used as marketed. Go
check out some beach bike paths on perfect days and see
how many scratchless treks and other unused "mountain"
bikes there are out there. I also wonder how many are just
hanging in a garage, never to be ridden again. With as
lazy as the average American is, I'd wager a huge
percentage of those bikes are out there. They don't make a
good bike, they make average bikes at best. Have you ever
ridden a really good bike?

> You probably get more for your buck with a Trek then with
> any botique bike.

That is complete and unadulterated bullcrap. How does one
get more bang for the buck with a broken frame? Does the
"BANG" come from the noise when the frame breaks? I buy
bikes to ride them as intended and nothing but the best will
last and that goes for anyone who wants to ride instead of
waiting for a warranty to be honored. How long did it take
for your Yugo to die on the highway?

> I only ride 3-4 times per week. Almost 100% N.C. single-
> track. Plenty of root, rocks, logs and bumps, and I catch
> a little air when I can. A typical ride may be anywhere
> from 3-11 miles, but I always feel like I've had a
> workout.

I rest my case. Don't think I don't know what the Piedmont
region of NC yields as far as trail conditions go either. I
lived and rode there.

JD
 
JD wrote:
> jem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<ephGc.-
> [email protected]>...
>
>>JD wrote:
>>
>>>jem <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<f8JFc-
>>>[email protected]>...
>>>
>>>
>>>>Jeff Edelen wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>jem wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Had my Fuel 80 for two years. I did have problems
>>>>>>early on with a crappy seat and a chainring that bent,
>>>>>>both of which the dealer made better at no cost to me.
>>>>>>Since then I've had no problems and absolutley love
>>>>>>the ride. Guess that makes me another of the millions
>>>>>>of statistical anomolies.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>How much over two hundred pounds do you weigh?
>>>>>
>>>>>-Jeff
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>Unfortunately about 30.
>>>
>>>
>>>You still haven't completed the puzzle. Where do you
>>>ride? How often do you ride? How many miles do you put in
>>>on an average week on *singletrack*? What kind of
>>>conditions do you ride in? Without those answers, your
>>>statement makes you much less than a statistical anomaly.
>>>I wonder what would happen to that trek if you rode The
>>>National on South Mountain three times a week... What do
>>>you think Jeff?
>>
>>Sure I have. I know that you're unlikely to admit that
>>Trek could make a good bike, even though they sell
>>hundreds of thousands of them each year. They do give
>>warranties to their frames, so it does pay to make them
>>good. Something about repeat business too, if your product
>>truly sucks then word will get around. Components wear
>>out, no matter what frame you hang them on.
>
>
> Apparently you missed the fact that trek gambles on most
> of their "mountain" bikes not getting used as a mountain
> bike and expect a certain amount of write-off from
> warranties on those bikes that do get used as marketed. Go
> check out some beach bike paths on perfect days and see
> how many scratchless treks and other unused "mountain"
> bikes there are out there. I also wonder how many are just
> hanging in a garage, never to be ridden again. With as
> lazy as the average American is, I'd wager a huge
> percentage of those bikes are out there. They don't make a
> good bike, they make average bikes at best. Have you ever
> ridden a really good bike?
>
>
>>You probably get more for your buck with a Trek then with
>>any botique bike.
>
>
> That is complete and unadulterated bullcrap. How does one
> get more bang for the buck with a broken frame? Does the
> "BANG" come from the noise when the frame breaks? I buy
> bikes to ride them as intended and nothing but the best
> will last and that goes for anyone who wants to ride
> instead of waiting for a warranty to be honored. How long
> did it take for your Yugo to die on the highway?
>
>
>>I only ride 3-4 times per week. Almost 100% N.C. single-
>>track. Plenty of root, rocks, logs and bumps, and I catch
>>a little air when I can. A typical ride may be anywhere
>>from 3-11 miles, but I always feel like I've had a
>>workout.
>
>
> I rest my case. Don't think I don't know what the Piedmont
> region of NC yields as far as trail conditions go either.
> I lived and rode there.
>
> JD

All I ever claim is that I've been happy with my Trek and
had good luck with it. Rest your case? Please, just rest
your moust. Or how about coming up with some hard statistics
on frame failure rates, but Trek or ANY bike manufacturer?