2004 OCR1 or 2003 TCR1

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by stucey, Feb 1, 2004.

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  1. stucey

    stucey New Member

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    Hi guys. Just after a guide as to what to do. I am going to purchase a road bike so I can finally get into some serious riding.

    Just after an opinion on what u guys would prefer.

    Pay $1,700 for a 2004 OCR1, or buy a second hand 2003 TCR1 for around $4-500 extra....with about 2,000km's on the clock.

    'Giant TCR1 carbon road bike size large with full Shimano Ultegra drivetrain, Shimano R540 Wheelset, all in excellent condition. Less than 2000k's from new '

    Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks:)
     
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  2. Jhikers

    Jhikers New Member

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    If the 2003 TCR1 is carbon - then look no further!!

    Carbon fibre is one of the most comfortable rides you will ever experience.

    If it isn't, it will be a much lighter aluminium frame than the OCR1 - but for $2,200 you might as well buy a brand new 2004 TCR at about $2700.

    The other reason is the groupset - Ultegra is lighter, more durable and a much smoother shift than Shimano105 groupset of the OCR1.

    The 2004 TCR-Composite2 (equivalent of the 2003 TCR-Composite1) retails for about $3800, but have seen it for $3449, so you'll be saving over $1000 there.

    The only thing you need to do is make sure the second-hand bike is the right frame size for you. If you don't already know, go down to your local Giant stocking bike store and get them to size you up on any TCR.

    Otherwise, that's it - for the extra $500 - I believe the difference in frame materials and groupsets is definitely worth it - considering it has done less than 2000km, and is said to be in EC.

    ENJOY!
     
  3. stucey

    stucey New Member

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    Yes, it is the TCR Carbon 1.

    I am 182cm so I think large is right, but like you say, should go and get measured.

    Appreciate the feedback. Thanks Jhikers.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    stucey <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi guys. Just after a guide as to what to do. I am going to purchase a road bike so I can finally
    > get into some serious riding.
    >
    > Just after an opinion on what u guys would prefer.
    >
    > Pay $1,700 for a 2004 OCR1, or buy a second hand 2003 TCR1 for around $4-500 extra....with about
    > 2,000km's on the clock.
    >
    > 'Giant TCR1 carbon road bike size large with full Shimano Ultegra drivetrain, Shimano R540
    > Wheelset, all in excellent condition. Less than 2000k's from new '
    >
    > Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks:)

    If it's your first road bike, go for the cheapest. Least to lose if you decide something else would
    suit you better.

    --
    Shane Stanley
     
  5. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Shane Stanley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > If it's your first road bike, go for the cheapest. Least to lose if
    you decide something else would suit you better.

    It's also new, which means you should get shop warranty and maybe some bits thrown in with the
    purchase (ask nicely! ;-)). If you have a nice bike shop they will fit you to the bike and deck you
    out with any other parts you need, perhaps a little cheaper because you are buying a bike as well.
    I'd buy the OCR unless I could stretch to the TCR.. What's the TCR cost new?

    hippy
     
  6. stucey

    stucey New Member

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    The TCR is $3,500 new, so a little out of the budget.
     
  7. stucey

    stucey New Member

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    The bike is actually on Ebay.....Here

    The guy lives near me and I have emailed him and he has got back with some good information and more pictures.

    But yeah, this is my first serious road bike, and although I know this is something I will stick with, I like the idea of a warranty on the bike and being professionaly fitted. Although the TCR would be great and all...:(

    Just unsure of what to do. The TCR is only $1,900.00 at the moment.
     
  8. amirm

    amirm New Member

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    You mean the bidding on the TCR is still going? If you have not negotiated a fixed price for the TCR, then the price is likely to hike as the auction is about to close.

    Other than that, I guess everyone else said it all. To recap: pluses of the TCR: a better bike with better components, and maybe a better price (relative to the new bike's price; if not too stretching); downsides: most likely it needs some extra spending to fit it right, and also there will be no warranty. And as mentioned before, if you end up not liking road biking, it will be more costly to you and a little bit harder to load off.

    OCR, on the other hand is inferior. But that's a tricky statement. Say the 105 gruppo may not be as smooth as Ultegra, but it's an amazing gruppo. It's the entry level to serious roadies and many use it on their training bikes. Ultegra and Dura-ace are for racing. So with your perspective as a biginner, 105 will keep you entertained for a long while. I personally wouldn't get worried about that. Difference in frame material and components is the only draw back of OCR. On the other hand, it's easier to own (cheaper), it comes with warranty, and you'll get to have it fit for you. You may look around to see if you can find 2003 stocks with reduced price tags to save even further.

    All in all, if you have fixed a price with the seller (TCR), and if you believe you'll be in for road riding for sure, and if the price is not too stretching, the TCR is the way to go. Otherwise, OCR will be a fine ride for you.


     
  9. stucey

    stucey New Member

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    Yes, the bidding is still going, it ends today. I based the price on what I thought the TCR would go for, around $2,100.00

    But if I can pick it up for less the $2,000.00, I think I will get it, otherwise it is the OCR for me. I don't plan to be doing any racing on the bike until I get at least 6 months solid riding done, so although the Ultegra would be nice, it isn't a necessity. There are still other things i will need, so I am sure the LBS will be able to do me a good package deal with cleats, computer, helmet etc...

    Cheers.:)
     
  10. stucey

    stucey New Member

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    Well, surprisingly the TCR went for $2,750.00, which is a good price......for the seller!

    So it is down to my LBS to get fitted and grab everything I need. OCR1 it is!

    This is roughly what I will get:

    Giant OCR1
    Shimano R-097 shoes
    Shimano SPD-R cleats
    Cateye Mity 3 or 8 computer
    Cateye LD 120 lights, front and back
    Blackburn Mountain air pump
    Decent helmet.

    Anything else? Perhaps a repair kit and a couple of spare tubes. Will eventually get a HRM when I get into it more

    Thanks for all the comments people, really enjoy this site. Full of good information and hints and stuff!:)
     
  11. amirm

    amirm New Member

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    Firstly, congratulations on your move. I'm sure you are up for a good fun.

    A few things, though:

    I am not surprised at all that the TCR went for more than $2100. The bids usually heat up just at the last moments. It looked to be a good bike for that price. Who knows, maybe you increased your competition by posting here!!! Incidentally, I got myself a TCR1 composite yesterday from e-bay J/K

    You have started with clipless pedals straight away. While it's a great idea, just be very very careful at the beginning. Falling is almost an inseparable part of the clipless pedal experience. You need to start in a quiet area where you can get a lot of practice. A while ago, we had a post here from someone who started using them on the first day of riding right at the peak hour in Sydney. The result was, as he put it, bloody. Practice a lot till it goes into your active memory.

    If you look into a possibility for an MTB in the future, you may want to consider Shimano SPD pedals and shoes instead. Just a thought.

    I am a fan of both computer and HRM. I started using HRM last year, and I regret the years that I didn't use it. So if you can stretch a little bit and get something that would give you both, you won't regret it. Some bike computers have HRM features and there are some HRMs that offer cycle computer functions. Have a look around.

    It's crucial that you carry at least a spare tube and tyre levers. A repair kit is also required sooner or later, especially if you don't have kevlar tyres. A tool set (looks like Swiss army knife) with multiple hex and scewdriver heads can save you when occasion calls. You will need a pump that goes high enough to pump to 110-140 psi (depending on your tyre). A floor pump is the way to go, unless you intend to perform your upper body building exercises with your mini pump ;)

    As for the helmet, get one that has one-piece moulding contruct (like MET).


     
  12. stucey

    stucey New Member

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    Hmm, the helmets I was looking at were something like the Met Tehpro ($109) or Crackerjack.

    HRM will most likely be the Polar A Series A-5, round $200. Nothing too fancy, but gives me the information I need.

    I know getting used to the clipless takes a little while, I was planning on practicing that a fair bit! Starting in peak hour wouldn't be too wise!

    Spare tube and tyre lever. No worries. There is a fair few accesories needed hey!
     
  13. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "stucey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Giant OCR1 Shimano R-097 shoes Shimano SPD-R cleats Cateye Mity 3 or 8 computer Cateye LD 120
    > lights, front and back Blackburn Mountain air pump Decent helmet.

    Not the newer Shimano SPD-SL pedals?

    > Anything else? Perhaps a repair kit and a couple of spare tubes. Will eventually get a HRM when I
    > get into it more

    I commute along a train line and don't bother carrying tools or spares most of the time, but for
    longer rides you will want a spare tube or two, patch kit, tyre levers, saddlepack perhaps to put it
    all in, a frame pump (try to get a 'road' version and not a chubby 'mtb' version).

    You should also get some padded cycling gloves for hand protection, comfort and tyre-scuffing
    potential. These are generally fingerless for road although when it gets cold you might want
    full gloves and get some clear/yellow sunnies to keep bugs out of your eyes without reducing
    night-vision.

    hth hippy
     
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