2006 Haro V4 Owners Crank Question.



T

Tom The Great

Guest
Just wondering if other 2006 Haro v4 are having the same problem.

My chain doesn't drop into the lowest/smallest crank very easily. It
jumps from the highest/largest front crank into the middle crank, but
from the middle to the lowest, it seems to have problems. Yes my
local bike shop has checked it, just seems to be a quirk.

So, anyone else see this?

later,

tom

P.S. Still a great bike for the price. :)
 
S

Slack

Guest
On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 14:26:50 -0700, Tom The Great <[email protected]> wrote:

> Just wondering if other 2006 Haro v4 are having the same problem.
>
> My chain doesn't drop into the lowest/smallest crank very easily. It
> jumps from the highest/largest front crank into the middle crank, but
> from the middle to the lowest, it seems to have problems. Yes my
> local bike shop has checked it, just seems to be a quirk.
>
> So, anyone else see this?
>
> later,
>
> tom
>
> P.S. Still a great bike for the price. :)



It might not have anything to do with the frame. Many front ders need to
be "modified" a little with the help of some pliers. I know mine did andI
don't ride a Haro.

See: http://www.bikewebsite.com/ftder.htm
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html
http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=75
____
Slack
 
P

Phil Lee, Squid

Guest
Slack wrote:
> On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 14:26:50 -0700, Tom The Great <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> Just wondering if other 2006 Haro v4 are having the same problem.
>>
>> My chain doesn't drop into the lowest/smallest crank very easily. It
>> jumps from the highest/largest front crank into the middle crank, but
>> from the middle to the lowest, it seems to have problems. Yes my
>> local bike shop has checked it, just seems to be a quirk.
>>
>> So, anyone else see this?
>>
>> later,
>>
>> tom
>>
>> P.S. Still a great bike for the price. :)

>
>
> It might not have anything to do with the frame. Many front ders need
> to be "modified" a little with the help of some pliers. I know mine
> did and I don't ride a Haro.


I second that. Also try (at your own risk) lowering the front derailleur as
very low as it will go without hitting the front chainrings, and tweak the
cage so that the rear part points inward just ever so slightly. I bet that
takes care of it. But the lowering almost always does the trick.

I really miss working on bikes. I'm currently working for the giant rat
here in Orlando.
--
Phil Lee, Squid
 
T

Tom The Great

Guest
On Thu, 6 Jul 2006 23:35:10 -0400, "Phil Lee, Squid"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Slack wrote:
>> On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 14:26:50 -0700, Tom The Great <[email protected]>
>> wrote:
>>> Just wondering if other 2006 Haro v4 are having the same problem.
>>>
>>> My chain doesn't drop into the lowest/smallest crank very easily. It
>>> jumps from the highest/largest front crank into the middle crank, but
>>> from the middle to the lowest, it seems to have problems. Yes my
>>> local bike shop has checked it, just seems to be a quirk.
>>>
>>> So, anyone else see this?
>>>
>>> later,
>>>
>>> tom
>>>
>>> P.S. Still a great bike for the price. :)

>>
>>
>> It might not have anything to do with the frame. Many front ders need
>> to be "modified" a little with the help of some pliers. I know mine
>> did and I don't ride a Haro.

>
>I second that. Also try (at your own risk) lowering the front derailleur as
>very low as it will go without hitting the front chainrings, and tweak the
>cage so that the rear part points inward just ever so slightly. I bet that
>takes care of it. But the lowering almost always does the trick.


Forgot to follow this up. I was in the process of getting my bike
worked on. The first front derailer was 'flawed'. So Haro's warranty
covered it.

Now with the new front derailer, it still has problems with dropping
into the lowest crank, and I found out why. When I first got the bike
I didn't mod anything other than get sealed bearing pedals(they are so
smooth), and eveything worked like a champ. Then I got a bash ring
for the front crank. This is when changes happened.

The front derailor has to be moved up to clear the bash-ring in the
highest gear. This causes for the chain to be lower, in the cage than
normal. So in high gear, not much lower, the middle gear a little
lower, and when trying to hit the lowest gear, very low. This causes
the chain to miss the 'hump' on the outter part of the inside of the
cage, causing the chain to not get bumped into the loweste gear.

This is what I've done, I've lowed the front derailer to the point
that it only clears the bash ring, in the highest crank, by a few
sheets of paper. Also, moved the rear part of the cage inward. This
greatly improved the action, and without removing the bashring, or
goind for a derailer with a longer cage, it seemed like all I could
do.

Thanks for the feedbacks.

>
>I really miss working on bikes. I'm currently working for the giant rat
>here in Orlando.



Sounds like the battle-cry of a person that should open a small repair
shop out of his/her garage. What's the worse, you make money and
leave the rat?

;)

tom
 
Tom The Great wrote:
> On Thu, 6 Jul 2006 23:35:10 -0400, "Phil Lee, Squid"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >Slack wrote:
> >> On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 14:26:50 -0700, Tom The Great <[email protected]>
> >> wrote:


<snip ... anything and everything of real importance>

> Sounds like the battle-cry of a person that should open a small repair
> shop out of his/her garage. What's the worse, you make money and
> leave the rat?



Ahhh yess how to make a small fortune in the bicycle industry.

1 Find the best location possible. While it is true that riders will
seek out a superior shop ... always start out with location.

2 Pick only the best lines of bicycles, parts, and accessories.
Research is everything. Know what sells in your market and why it
sells. Never be afraid to abandon a line if sweeping changes are made.

3 Pick only the best staff. Your staff represents you ... pay the best
and expect the best.

4 Stay excited about the work that you do. Don't let the day to day get
you down, stay informed and stay on top of indusrty trends.

5 Advertise .... Advertise ... Advertise

6 Work hard ... forget the "morning," "noon" and or "weekend" rides.
You'll have plenty of time to ride once you've made your small fortune.
Hard work and lots of it ... long hours ... nights and weekends.

7 Start out with a LARGE fortune.

In no time at all you'll have a small fortune ... with the help of the
bicycle industry.

R

Thanks to "Wild" Bill Monroy of Wilsons Cycle supply for making this
post possible.


>
> ;)
>
> tom
 
T

Tom The Great

Guest
On 7 Jul 2006 18:22:14 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

>
>Tom The Great wrote:
>> On Thu, 6 Jul 2006 23:35:10 -0400, "Phil Lee, Squid"
>> <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> >Slack wrote:
>> >> On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 14:26:50 -0700, Tom The Great <[email protected]>
>> >> wrote:

>
><snip ... anything and everything of real importance>
>
>> Sounds like the battle-cry of a person that should open a small repair
>> shop out of his/her garage. What's the worse, you make money and
>> leave the rat?

>
>
>Ahhh yess how to make a small fortune in the bicycle industry.
>
>1 Find the best location possible. While it is true that riders will
>seek out a superior shop ... always start out with location.
>
>2 Pick only the best lines of bicycles, parts, and accessories.
>Research is everything. Know what sells in your market and why it
>sells. Never be afraid to abandon a line if sweeping changes are made.
>
>3 Pick only the best staff. Your staff represents you ... pay the best
>and expect the best.
>
>4 Stay excited about the work that you do. Don't let the day to day get
>you down, stay informed and stay on top of indusrty trends.
>
>5 Advertise .... Advertise ... Advertise
>
>6 Work hard ... forget the "morning," "noon" and or "weekend" rides.
>You'll have plenty of time to ride once you've made your small fortune.
>Hard work and lots of it ... long hours ... nights and weekends.
>
>7 Start out with a LARGE fortune.
>
>In no time at all you'll have a small fortune ... with the help of the
>bicycle industry.
>
>R
>
>Thanks to "Wild" Bill Monroy of Wilsons Cycle supply for making this
>post possible.



Ha, Ha, Ha!

Good post. I know many bike shop owners under the stress of day to
day operating budgets. Causes for some to have less than desirable
attitudes to their customers. So I like when I find a great shop.

You are very correct, Location, Location, Location, like any business
will help with getting a fully operating shop. Since this could give
sources of revenue from rentals, people with more disposible income,
etc.

I ONLY suggested doing bike repair on the side, and keep his/her day
job. Because you right, the bicycle industry, does sometimes make a
LBS's business differcult, with their retooling of models, and
fluxuating MSRP's.

later,

tom @ www.NoCostAds.com




>
>
>>
>> ;)
>>
>> tom
 
T

Tom The Great

Guest
Just asking...

I have basicly a stock 2006 Haro V4, can anyone recommend real quick a
front derailer with a longer cage? To compensate for a bash-ring, and
higher mounting.

thx,

tom
 
P

Phil Lee, Squid

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Tom The Great wrote:
>> On Thu, 6 Jul 2006 23:35:10 -0400, "Phil Lee, Squid"
>> <[email protected]om> wrote:
>>
>>> Slack wrote:
>>>> On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 14:26:50 -0700, Tom The Great <[email protected]>
>>>> wrote:

>
> <snip ... anything and everything of real importance>
>
>> Sounds like the battle-cry of a person that should open a small
>> repair shop out of his/her garage. What's the worse, you make money
>> and leave the rat?

>
>
> Ahhh yess how to make a small fortune in the bicycle industry.
>
> 1 Find the best location possible. While it is true that riders will
> seek out a superior shop ... always start out with location.


The shop I worked at had this, for sure. Right on the edge of campus.

> 2 Pick only the best lines of bicycles, parts, and accessories.
> Research is everything. Know what sells in your market and why it
> sells. Never be afraid to abandon a line if sweeping changes are made.


We have just switched to the good stuff for a lot of our stuff.

> 3 Pick only the best staff. Your staff represents you ... pay the best
> and expect the best.


Yeah... this is where we were lacking.

> 4 Stay excited about the work that you do. Don't let the day to day
> get you down, stay informed and stay on top of indusrty trends.


That's a good one.

> 5 Advertise .... Advertise ... Advertise


We tend to do only a little of this.

> 6 Work hard ... forget the "morning," "noon" and or "weekend" rides.
> You'll have plenty of time to ride once you've made your small
> fortune. Hard work and lots of it ... long hours ... nights and
> weekends.


I was a friggin student and "assistant manager" and had no time.

> 7 Start out with a LARGE fortune.


Err... I'm glad I wasn't the owner.

> In no time at all you'll have a small fortune ... with the help of the
> bicycle industry.


I would never start a retail business if I knew what I was getting into.
--
Phil Lee, Squid
 
P

Phil Lee, Squid

Guest
Tom The Great wrote:
> On Thu, 6 Jul 2006 23:35:10 -0400, "Phil Lee, Squid"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>> Slack wrote:
>>> On Sat, 01 Jul 2006 14:26:50 -0700, Tom The Great <[email protected]>
>>> wrote:
>>>> Just wondering if other 2006 Haro v4 are having the same problem.
>>>>
>>>> My chain doesn't drop into the lowest/smallest crank very easily.
>>>> It jumps from the highest/largest front crank into the middle
>>>> crank, but from the middle to the lowest, it seems to have
>>>> problems. Yes my local bike shop has checked it, just seems to be
>>>> a quirk.
>>>>
>>>> So, anyone else see this?
>>>>
>>>> later,
>>>>
>>>> tom
>>>>
>>>> P.S. Still a great bike for the price. :)
>>>
>>>
>>> It might not have anything to do with the frame. Many front ders
>>> need to be "modified" a little with the help of some pliers. I know
>>> mine did and I don't ride a Haro.

>>
>> I second that. Also try (at your own risk) lowering the front
>> derailleur as very low as it will go without hitting the front
>> chainrings, and tweak the cage so that the rear part points inward
>> just ever so slightly. I bet that takes care of it. But the
>> lowering almost always does the trick.

>
> Forgot to follow this up. I was in the process of getting my bike
> worked on. The first front derailer was 'flawed'. So Haro's warranty
> covered it.
>
> Now with the new front derailer, it still has problems with dropping
> into the lowest crank, and I found out why. When I first got the bike
> I didn't mod anything other than get sealed bearing pedals(they are so
> smooth), and eveything worked like a champ. Then I got a bash ring
> for the front crank. This is when changes happened.
>
> The front derailor has to be moved up to clear the bash-ring in the
> highest gear. This causes for the chain to be lower, in the cage than
> normal. So in high gear, not much lower, the middle gear a little
> lower, and when trying to hit the lowest gear, very low. This causes
> the chain to miss the 'hump' on the outter part of the inside of the
> cage, causing the chain to not get bumped into the loweste gear.
>
> This is what I've done, I've lowed the front derailer to the point
> that it only clears the bash ring, in the highest crank, by a few
> sheets of paper. Also, moved the rear part of the cage inward. This
> greatly improved the action, and without removing the bashring, or
> goind for a derailer with a longer cage, it seemed like all I could
> do.


That right there is the critical thing that virtually everybody misses.
They think that having it 1 or 2mm above the chainring is the important
thing when in fact it needs to be "sheets of paper" away. This drives me
nuts because a lot of new bikes have the front derailleurs way too high, and
they need to be reset.

> Thanks for the feedbacks.
>
>>
>> I really miss working on bikes. I'm currently working for the giant
>> rat here in Orlando.

>
>
> Sounds like the battle-cry of a person that should open a small repair
> shop out of his/her garage. What's the worse, you make money and
> leave the rat?


I'm earning 80% more at this internship than I did at my own job. And
nobody asks me the price of anything! ;)

--
Phil Lee, Squid