2006 Schwinn Varsity at Wal*Mart

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by [email protected], Feb 15, 2006.

  1. Strayhorn wrote:

    > "Adam Rush" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> Who wouldn't want one? Okay, not me.

    >>
    >> Are you saying that there are people who look back
    >> fondly on the Varsity?

    >
    > You bet. My college girlfriend had one -
    > in screaming zonker yellow.
    >
    > Or maybe I'm just fond of the memory of her on it . . .


    As I was rolling in to school one morning about fifteen years ago, I saw
    one of my students arriving on a purple Varsity. She explained that it
    was the bike her dad rode to the same college about twenty years prior.
    It was in perfectly serviceable shape, and it was obvious that she and
    her dad both regarded it fondly.

    --
    "Bicycling is a healthy and manly pursuit with much
    to recommend it, and, unlike other foolish crazes,
    it has not died out." -- The Daily Telegraph (1877)
     


  2. Plastic! yes. Some of the bikes being sold at wallymart have plastic
    bits in the quick release levers. I saw one that use a nylon looking
    piece as the cam reciever. Over tighten and the plastic will crack
    and break. The plastic pieces fall out, leaving the wheel so loose the
    lawyers lips are ineffective. Then the front wheel falls off. These
    may be the same levers that wallymart just defended in court. Seems
    many children have done the 'flying face plant' while riding. There
    was a website with photos of the smashed up faces. nasty looking.

    Given the low level of knowledge of wallymart bike assemblers,
    wallymart customers and wallymart corporate bike purchasers, wallymart
    selling bikes with any QR levers is just many injuries waiting to
    happen in addition to all those already.
     
  3. [email protected] wrote:

    <snipped>

    >
    > Given the low level of knowledge of wallymart bike assemblers,




    "low level of knowledge"? Aren't you the guy who works at an LBS whose
    owner tried to sell someone who had a *flat tire* a new wheel because
    he a) didn't have a suitable replacement tube and b) couldn't figure
    out how to make what he did have work?

    Pots, kettles, stones, glass houses, etc., etc.
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Adam Rush" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > parts. Non existant quality. Bad finish on most parts. But it has the
    > > Schwinn name on it so it must have Schwinn's legendary quality and a
    > > Varsity to boot. Who wouldn't want one? Okay, not me.

    >
    > Are you saying that there are people who look back fondly on the
    > Varsity?


    hey, i RACED on a varsity. okay, raced and LOST on a varsity. but
    i was up against hans schneider, so i don't think the varsity was
    entirely at fault. damn exciting racing, though, since there was
    always a sizeable chance that the welded-on kickstand was going
    to choose to descend on any halfway rough corner.
     
  5. Adam Rush

    Adam Rush Guest

    I remember that Varsities always had such a perfect connection between
    the down and top tubes and the steer tube. I also know that those
    frames were so damn heavy that the clamp on our shops frame ended up
    finally breaking under one.

    What was it they did building them?
     
  6. Adam Rush wrote:
    > I remember that Varsities always had such a perfect connection between
    > the down and top tubes and the steer tube. I also know that those
    > frames were so damn heavy that the clamp on our shops frame ended up
    > finally breaking under one.
    >
    > What was it they did building them?


    See "Inside the Varsity" by Marc S. Muller, conveniently located on S.
    Brown's website:
    <http://sheldonbrown.com/varsity.html>.

    --
    Tom Sherman
     
  7. Mike Jacoubowski wrote:

    >>>If you can go just slightly higher, I would suggest that a $249 hybrid,

    available at many bicycle shops and (hopefully, though not always...
    shops
    do vary, but we're not all as bad as one poster believes) a
    high-quality
    assembly job. Plus a typically free 30-day check, on-site repair work,
    etc.

    No, it's not a "road" bike, but it does a better job at being what it
    looks
    like it is. A very functional bike that's reasonably efficient ** and
    will last
    much longer than its department-store brethren ** <<<

    My last two bikes have been "department store" bikes, and they held up
    pretty well. This will be the 4th year for my "Wal*goose" hybrid, and
    I've had no problems with it whatsoever, save for needing to have the
    rear wheel trued (but that was because I ran over a curb). It's
    probably got close to 3000 miles on it, and it shows no signs of
    stopping any time soon.

    The bike before (a rather plain MTB) I got on clearance from Sears, and
    I had it for a little over 5 years until it got stolen. If I remember
    correctly, I had to replace a brake cable for some reason, but
    otherwise it performed flawlessly.

    Okay, granted, they would probably never be able to do a century or
    anything along those lines, but for the type of riding I do, mainly
    recreational riding (mainly paved paths, and a few dirts trails),
    they're just fine.

    So to say that a bike from a LBS will last "much longer than its
    department-store brethren" is not always the case.

    Anyway, that's my 2 cents worth, for what it's worth.

    Peace.
     
  8. Adam Rush

    Adam Rush Guest

    Carl Fogel had a great series of posts about his experience with a Fury
    Roadmaster. What ever happened to him?
     
  9. Adam Rush wrote:
    > Carl Fogel had a great series of posts about his experience with a Fury
    > Roadmaster. What ever happened to him?


    Mr. Fogel likely became disappointed with the quality of the people on
    "wreck.bicycles" and left.

    --
    Tom Sherman
     
  10. G.T.

    G.T. Guest

    Johnny Sunset aka Tom Sherman wrote:
    > Adam Rush wrote:
    >
    >>Carl Fogel had a great series of posts about his experience with a Fury
    >>Roadmaster. What ever happened to him?

    >
    >
    > Mr. Fogel likely became disappointed with the quality of the people on
    > "wreck.bicycles" and left.
    >


    Who cares? I found that whole Roadmaster thread more obnoxious than a
    JB vs jb flamewar.

    Greg None

    --
    "All my time I spent in heaven
    Revelries of dance and wine
    Waking to the sound of laughter
    Up I'd rise and kiss the sky" - The Mekons
     
  11. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    Adam Rush wrote:

    > I remember that Varsities always had such a perfect connection between
    > the down and top tubes and the steer tube. I also know that those
    > frames were so damn heavy that the clamp on our shops frame ended up
    > finally breaking under one.
    >
    > What was it they did building them?


    The actual joint is an inch and a half behind where you
    think it is. On the occasional poor weld you can see the
    dovetail pattern joint well behind the smooth headtube.

    They are just mild steel seamed pipe, nothing special.
    --
    Andrew Muzi
    www.yellowjersey.org
    Open every day since 1 April, 1971
     
  12. Andrew Muzi wrote:
    > Adam Rush wrote:
    >
    > > I remember that Varsities always had such a perfect connection between
    > > the down and top tubes and the steer tube. I also know that those
    > > frames were so damn heavy that the clamp on our shops frame ended up
    > > finally breaking under one.
    > >
    > > What was it they did building them?

    >
    > The actual joint is an inch and a half behind where you
    > think it is. On the occasional poor weld you can see the
    > dovetail pattern joint well behind the smooth headtube.
    >
    > They are just mild steel seamed pipe, nothing special.


    My cynical side believes that slapping an "AISI 1010 Steel" sticker on
    such bicycles would improve their sales. After all, the normalized
    areas around the welds must have a yield strength of 26 ksi or so!

    --
    Tom Sherman
     
  13. You have the correct person. The owner of that LBS 'real' job is loss
    containment for the regional wallymart warehouse. (aka night watchman)
    The lbs is the owners saturday only hobby in a small town that would
    not support a full time lbs. I help him with the bike repair for on
    ragbari for entertainment instead of drinking. Besides he and the
    ragbraiers really need some expert help.
     
  14. Electro forging! They would take the two pieces to be joined, put them
    in a giant welder similar to a spot welder, slam the two parts
    together! The huge electric current would melt them together in a
    flash. Then grind off the exterior to make it smooth. On some of
    those bikes you can see the flash on the insides, often with a small
    hole right in the center. I saw a video of the machine in action one
    time. The tubing (really sheet steel curled over to make tubes) has to
    be heavy to withstand the process. thick low-carbon steel. The bottom
    bracket and head tube assembly were stamped sheet steel and welded
    together too. No expensive materials here. Just expensive machinery
    that could make these by the million.
     
  15. [email protected] wrote:
    > Electro forging! They would take the two pieces to be joined, put them
    > in a giant welder similar to a spot welder, slam the two parts
    > together! The huge electric current would melt them together in a
    > flash. Then grind off the exterior to make it smooth. On some of
    > those bikes you can see the flash on the insides, often with a small
    > hole right in the center. I saw a video of the machine in action one
    > time. The tubing (really sheet steel curled over to make tubes) has to
    > be heavy to withstand the process. thick low-carbon steel. The bottom
    > bracket and head tube assembly were stamped sheet steel and welded
    > together too. No expensive materials here. Just expensive machinery
    > that could make these by the million.



    "No expensive materials here (old time Schwinn)"? Did I miss
    something? Was Schwinn pretending to make Colnagos, or even Peugeots?
    Or were they selling rugged, reasonably cheap bikes tailored to the
    American market of that time?
     
  16. G.T. wrote:
    > Johnny Sunset aka Tom Sherman wrote:
    > > Adam Rush wrote:
    > >
    > >>Carl Fogel had a great series of posts about his experience with a Fury
    > >>Roadmaster. What ever happened to him?

    > >
    > >
    > > Mr. Fogel likely became disappointed with the quality of the people on
    > > "wreck.bicycles" and left.
    > >

    >
    > Who cares?


    I was being both serious and sarcastic. I think JB had
    "[email protected]" pretty well pegged.

    --
    Tom Sherman - Behind the Cheddar Curtain
     
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