2010 Tour de France: Stage 2, Brussels - Spa, 201 km

Discussion in 'Professional Cycling' started by steve, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. steve

    steve Administrator
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    2010 Tour de France: Stage 2, Brussels - Spa, 201 km

    There are six categorized climbs in this stage, three each in the third and fourth categories. The finish comes off the descent of the Rosier Pass, visited 12 km (7.5 mi) before the conclusion of the stage.

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iyv3dTIUGAM[/ame]

    Stage 2 Map
    View attachment 12463

    Stage 2 Profile
    View attachment 12464

    The last few KM's
    View attachment 12465

    Stage 2 climbs

    Km 98.0 - Côte de France - 2.2 km climb to 6.2 % - Category 4
    Km 128.5 - Côte de Filot - 3.9 km climb to 4.5 % - Category 4
    Km 136.0 - Côte de Werbomont - 4.5 km climb to 3.5 % - Category 4
    Km 161.5 - Côte d'Aisomont - 4.5 km climb to 5.2 % - Category 3
    Km 167.5 - Col de Stockeu - 3.0 km climb to 5.9 % - Category 3
    Km 189.0 - Col du Rosier - 6.4 km climb to 4 % - Category 3

    Top 10 General classification after stage 1

    1 Fabian Cancellara (Swi) Team Saxo Bank 5:19:38
    2 Tony Martin (Ger) Team HTC - Columbia 0:00:10
    3 David Millar (GBr) Garmin - Transitions 0:00:20
    4 Lance Armstrong (USA) Team Radioshack 0:00:22
    5 Geraint Thomas (GBr) Sky Professional Cycling Team 0:00:23
    6 Alberto Contador Velasco (Spa) Astana 0:00:27
    7 Tyler Farrar (USA) Garmin - Transitions 0:00:28
    8 Levi Leipheimer (USA) Team Radioshack
    9 Edvald Boasson Hagen (Nor) Sky Professional Cycling Team 0:00:32
    10 Linus Gerdemann (Ger) Team Milram 0:00:35
     
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  2. steve

    steve Administrator
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    Stage 2 News Links

    Chavanel's feat should not be underestimated
    SYLVAIN Chavanel made it a day to savour for the Belgian QuickStep team by winning the Tour de France stage from Brussels to Spa. It was a huge feat for Patrick Levefere's squad as Chavanel also pulled on the Yellow Leader's jersey after the stage.
    Link: Sylvain Chavanel's feat should not be underestimated | The Australian

    McEwen to continue despite nasty wound
    Robbie McEwen (Itera-Katusha) will continue searching for his first Tour de France stage victory since 2007, despite suffering a deep laceration to his elbow on stage 2. McEwen was taken to hospital for treatment to the wound after rolling across the line in fourth place.
    Link: McEwen To Continue Despite Nasty Wound | Cyclingnews.com

    War de France! Carnage for riders and there's worse to come
    If bike racing in Belgium was like this every day, the Tour de France organisers would include it in their route annually. Then again, there might not be any riders left to climb the Alps or the Pyrenees at the rate France’s northern neighbour claims victims.
    After Sunday’s chaos, violent showers along the route from Brussels to Spa provoked more crashes, thrills and spills in the hills of the Ardennes forest.
    Link: TOUR DE FRANCE 2010: War de France! Carnage for riders and there's worse to come | Mail Online

    Cancellara not disappointed after putting riders ahead of yellow
    Despite losing the yellow jersey on stage 2 of the Tour de France, Fabian Cancellara (Saxo Bank) found himself at the centre of attention, leading the peloton home in a protest against the dangerous conditions the riders faced during the stage.
    Link: Cancellara Not Disappointed After Putting Riders Ahead Of Yellow | Cyclingnews.com

    Truce called after second day of collisions leaves several injured
    A second day of spectacular crashes on the Tour de France involving British favourite Bradley Wiggins, American champion Lance Armstrong and last year's runner-up, Andy Schleck, saw the main contenders call a truce and cross the finish line grouped together behind stage winner Sylvain Chavanel.
    Link: Cycling: Truce called after second day of collisions leaves several injured - Others, More Sports - The Independent

    Broken ribs crack Vande Velde’s Tour dream
    Garmin-Transitions general classification hope Christian Vande Velde has withdrawn from the Tour de France after suffering two broken ribs after a crash-plagued second stage. Vande Velde was caught in two accidents on the Stockeu, which also left him with left eyelid lacerations that required multiple stitches.
    Link: Broken Ribs Crack Vande Velde?s Tour Dream | Cyclingnews.com

    Chavanel takes firm grip on yellow
    SYLVAIN Chavanel came back from a cracked skull in April to take the stage and a stranglehold on the yellow jersey going into today's third day of the three week enduro. The 31-year-old Frenchman on the Belgium Quick Step team had fractured his skull in a crash on these same roads they raced over today at the Liege-Bastogne-Liege race.
    Link: Sylvain Chavanel takes firm grip on yellow | The Australian

    Riders stage mini-protest by not sprinting to the line
    Tour de France riders staged a mini-protest on Monday after rain and an oil spill combined to make the roads ultra slippery on the 201-km second stage from Brussels.
    Link: Riders stage mini-protest by not sprinting to the line | Reuters

    Big guns escape with minor injuries in Tour crash
    Defending Tour de France champion Alberto Contador, Lance Armstrong and the Schleck brothers escaped with minor injuries after a massive crash in Monday's second stage. The quartet fell off their bikes in the descent of the col de Stockeu, some 30 kms from the finish, after rain and an oil spill had made the road extremely slippery.
    Link: Big guns escape with minor injuries in Tour crash | Sports | Reuters

    Riders Limp Into Perilous Stage of Tour
    Consecutive days of dramatic crashes have made this Tour seem more like roller derby than a cycling race. Some riders said that on Monday, more than half of the nearly 200 competitors, including many race favorites, fell to the ground at least once. Several even fell twice on the same stretch of road. The unluckiest ones fell three times or more.
    Link: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/06/sports/cycling/06tour.html?src=mv

    Armstrong Joins Spills In Tour's 2nd Stage
    Lance Armstrong, Alberto Contador and nearly half of the riders in the Tour de France have hit the ground after only two stages — and the crash bonanza could get even worse. Seven-time Tour champion Armstrong and his biggest rival Contador were caught up in a series of crashes Monday as scores of riders went down during a rain-soaked second stage.
    Link: More Trouble Await Tour Riders On Cobbles : NPR

    Spilled oil blamed for Tour carnage
    Spilled oil from a motorbike which crashed ahead of the Tour de France peloton on the second stage Monday was suspected of being the main cause of crashes involving dozens of riders. Reigning champion Alberto Contador, seven-time winner Lance Armstrong and last year's runner-up Andy Schleck were among the crash victims as the peloton raced up and down the hills which dotted the end of the 201km ride from Brussels.
    Link: Spilled oil blamed for Tour carnage - Cycling - More Sports - Sports - The Times of India

    Hushovd furious as points neutralised in Spa
    Green jersey hopeful Thor Hushovd looked furious after crossing the finish line of the Tour de France's second stage from Brussels to Spa. Likely to lose his temper and use too-strong words in front of the media, he had to go inside his team bus and cool down before talking to the press about the race jury's decision to neutralise the points classification for the day.
    Link: Hushovd Furious As Points Neutralised In Spa | Cyclingnews.com

    Full sweep for Chavanel
    Frenchman Sylvain Chavanel has vanquished all of his early season mishaps by winning stage two of this year's Tour de France to Spa and taking the yellow jersey of race leader with his solo victory.
    Link: Full Sweep For Chavanel | Cyclingnews.com




    Tour de France 2nd stage under way
    Riders have set off for the second stage of the Tour de France, a day after multiple crashes marred the ride through the Netherlands and Belgium. Switzerland's Fabian Cancellara is in the lead, and seven-time Tour winner Lance Armstrong is fourth, 22 seconds behind, as riders begin Monday's 125-mile run from Brussels to Spa.
    Link: The Associated Press: Tour de France 2nd stage under way

    Tour de France 2010, stage two: Classics territory offers puncheurs chance to shine
    The 201km route from Brussels to Spa features a total of six punchy climbs, most of which are in the latter half of the course, meaning puncheurs like Damiano Cunego and Cadel Evans, and purer climbers like Andy Schleck, should harbour personal ambitions. Also, look out for Fabian Cancellara if he wasn't hurt too badly in yesterday's crash and the Team Sky's versatile Edvald Boasson Hagen who is beginning to show good form again.
    Link: Tour de France 2010, stage two: Classics territory offers puncheurs chance to shine - Telegraph

    Cycling-Tour second stage is a mini Liege-Bastogne-Liege
    The Tour de France peloton may wonder if they are riding the wrong race in Monday's second stage as its 201 kms to Spa have striking similarities with the Liege-Bastogne-Liege classic.
    Link: Cycling-Tour second stage is a mini Liege-Bastogne-Liege - Yahoo! Eurosport

    A nice day for a Spa
    It's not often the Tour de France features six climbs in a stage so early in the race. But it will occur Monday when the 97th edition takes the riders 201 kilometers (124.8 miles) from Brussels to Spa in stage 2.
    Link: Tour de France, stage 2 preview: A nice day for a Spa
     
  3. Scotttri

    Scotttri Member

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    Looks like a great stage for a breakaway to succeed. Will be interesting to see how many are sore from yesterdays crash's.
     
  4. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Probably not a decisive stage since the biggest question should be if Canc. can hold onto the yellow.
     
  5. Eldrack

    Eldrack New Member

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    Hmm, should be enough hills in this one to drop most of the sprinters but I wouldn't be surprised if Freire manages to hold on to the finish. And if he does he'll definitely win the sprint so I'm betting on him for the win.

    It'll come down to how hard the teams want to push it, whether or not they treat it like LBL in which case the field will be shredded. With tomorrows cobbles to worry about I don't think they'll do to much damage so Cancellara should be able to hold onto yellow.
     
  6. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    A good question, after today's stage, might be, "who didn't crash?"
     
  7. Andrija

    Andrija Member

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    It looks like the peloton has new boss - Cancellara.
     
  8. TimEaston

    TimEaston New Member

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    I'm disappointed with Cancellara effectively deciding to stage a protest about the climbs when these stages are on some of the classics they travel over every year. I hope they don't have a similar protest tomorrow as it is likely to be a wet stage with cobbles near the end.:mad::mad:
     
  9. genedan

    genedan New Member

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    why didn't he drop back to help his teammates?
     
  10. genedan

    genedan New Member

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    why didn't he drop back to help his teammates?
     
  11. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    I'm all for the riders looking out for their safety, so whatever the reason for today's neutralization, be it protest or out of deference to all the riders that were down on the road, I'm ok with it. The riders have to look after themselves because neither the organizers nor the fans do. Of course, decisions are made easily when sitting comfortably at the computer monitor. Alas, the riders didn't have that luxury.
     
  12. bing181

    bing181 New Member

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    I know that's what's being thrown around, but the situation with those climbs in LBL is very different ... they come near the end of a very long race, and there are never 200 or so riders going over Stockeu together. Nor are there 200 cars and support vehicles. Nor is the peloton made up of sprinters or GC riders, all pushing. By that time in the race, it's down to 10 or so likely candidates, with a few hangers-on.

    FWIW, I've done that climb a few times, and to send a TDF peloton over it is just ridiculous. It's dark, narrow, windy, and has a very rough surface. As Horner said, "they got what they deserved".
     
  13. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    FWIW, Velonews is reporting that the a TV motorcycle that crashed trying to avoid the first rider down left oil all over the road for the main bunch to ride through. In light of that, I think what Cancellara and the peloton did and the jury decided was fair.
     
  14. Eldrack

    Eldrack New Member

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    The main problem with the route was that they went up the Stockeu the wrong way, so they were descending it via the ridiculously steep side that's normally climbed in LBL. So actually todays route was more dangerous than LBL! Especially given the fact the whole field was descending the climb at the same time.

    I know it's sporting of the teams who had their GC contenders at the front not to put the hammer down and put the Schlecks out of contention but it sure did make for a boring end of the race. Hopefully tomorrow will be fun.

    I guess this is a message to the organisers of these races. By all means make them interesting but there's no need for making any stage of a bike race overly dangerous. This stage would have been much more fun if they'd been climbing the Stockeu from that direction and descending it down the gentler side.

    All in all they should let me design next years Tour route :p. And Giro and Vuelta etc etc.
     
  15. jamie72

    jamie72 New Member

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    I wonder if Cancellara would've been so noble had it not been Andy Schleck losing the most time? I'm sure he'd have loved to put the hammer down today. Maybe that's why he looked so cross at the end!!
     
  16. Chavez

    Chavez New Member

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    Yeah, it probably didn't hurt that it was the guy(s)* Cancellara is riding in support of who needed help.

    Then again, I haven't ever seen anything to suggest that Canc is less than a sporting fellow. He DID hold the field back and negotiate the neutral finish AFTER the Schlecks had rejoined.

    * - if I HAD to bet, I'd actually bet on Frank Schleck, he has looked to have better form so far than Andy
     
  17. Eldrack

    Eldrack New Member

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    Apparently Gesink has a broken arm so he'll be out tomorrow. Vandevelde and Farrar were pretty badly damaged and off to hospital, so they might be out as well. Evans said that one of the reasons they didn't race the final parts of the stage was because it wouldn't be fair on those who had been injured in the crashes. Sounds reasonable to me.
     
  18. roadhouse

    roadhouse New Member

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  19. Scotttri

    Scotttri Member

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    Well what a boreing stage, noble of the riders I agree, but if there gona do this everytime a favourite has a crash then this race is gona be boreing. As far as crashing goes, well thats part of raceing, I didn't see them all slow down when there were crashes in the giro......others took full advantage of it, so why do it now. If there was oil on the road then fair enough I can understand there reason for sitting up and letting everyone re-join, but if it was rider eror, then well they all know it's wet there all experienced riders and should know to adjust to conditions acordingly. I'm suprised Evans wasn't more annoyed considering he's been on the end of it a couple of times lately, loseing time early on in the giro to a crash that was not of his fault, and also to a flat in the Vuelta that cost him perhaps the Grands tour win, he was in the lead group this time and could have taken advantage of it, maybe you can believe what goes around comes around, but not in this case, it's raceing, it's unfortunate, but thats how it is.
     
  20. steve

    steve Administrator
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    Ouch, that guy has lost a fair bit of skin.
     
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