2011 Scott S30 drivetrain noise



ScottSteveS30

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May 9, 2011
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I recently got a 2011 Scott S30 about 9 days ago and have put about 70 miles on the bike so far. Last night i decided to lube my chain with the supplies my friend lent me that he uses for his 2010 Scott S30. I used citrus bike cleaner to remove the dirt and such and then I rinsed it with water, let that dry, then applied White Lightening Clean Ride wax/lubricant to my chain. Then I removed the excess from the chain and let it dry overnight. Then, this morning when I moved the crank a few times to see how it sounded, it seemed a lot louder and had a lot more excess noise that I didn't noitice the day before. I rode 17 miles before and I didn't notice all of the excess noise. So what do you guys think? Should I be worried? Or am I just be paranoid?
 

vspa

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Jan 11, 2009
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the procedure you used is quite right, just give it a couple more training rides to see how it goes with the chain,
i would say is nothing to worry about, new bikes often sell with no chain-lubricant whatsoever so that could be the reason that you notice a change,
 
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alfeng

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Jul 23, 2005
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Originally Posted by ScottSteveS30 .

Last night i decided to lube my chain with the supplies my friend lent me that he uses for his 2010 Scott S30. I used citrus bike cleaner to remove the dirt and such and then I rinsed it with water, let that dry, then applied White Lightening Clean Ride wax/lubricant to my chain. Then I removed the excess from the chain and let it dry overnight. Then, this morning when I moved the crank a few times to see how it sounded, it seemed a lot louder and had a lot more excess noise that I didn't noitice the day before. I rode 17 miles before and I didn't notice all of the excess noise. So what do you guys think? Should I be worried? Or am I just be paranoid?
FYI. It may be counter-intuitive, but some so-called eco-friendly cleaners are apparently caustic and using them on your chain could shorten their life ...

I leave the cosmolene on my Shimano chains ...

I generally just use 3-in-1, or equivalent, oil on my chains because I want a lubricant that will penetrate between the plates-and-rollers.
 

davereo

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Jun 17, 2010
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I have stopped using solvents of any kind cleaning my chains. I have found that the solvents clean between the link plates so well that they allow the particles of sand and whatever to migrate between them.

For the past two years I have been wiping my chains with a shop rag and applying lube every 100 to 150 miles.

The build up of dirt and sand is removed from my chain when I wash my bike.

This is the first year I have left the cosmolene on my new chains. I am happier already from doing so.
 

ProdigalCyclist

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May 3, 2011
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Back in the day (late 80s early 90s) a mechanics trick was that they used Diesel Gas to clean the chain because Diesel has a lot of lubricant in it. So if you use Diesel to clean the parts you are effectively NOT ever stripping the parts completely of lubricant. And since stripping the lubricant completely is actually the situation you're trying to avoid this makes good sense. Not sure if Diesel is used much today. But that's what used to be used... and it's they way I intend to maintain my chain now.

Back when I used to race I kept two chains and rotated them. I stored my "spare" chain in some Diesel. When it was time to "lube" my chain I would simply switch the chain wipe off all excess Diesel by holding a rag on the chain as I freewheeled the pedal for a while (until the chain was dry to the touch and left no film on the tip of my finger when I ran it down the chain) and then applied Phil Wood Tenacious Oil to the dry chain.


If you get a chance.... Follow a riders return to the bike after a 15+ year "offseason" http://theprodigalcyclistca.blogspot.com/
 

vspa

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Jan 11, 2009
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Diesel and petroleum are no longer recommended, although their effectiveness in cleaning those hard to kill dirt in chains and derrailleurs for example is hard to beat ! i guess they had some kind of corrosive unwanted side effect in the long run,
 

ProdigalCyclist

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May 3, 2011
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Well... I never saw any corrosive side effects, in the years that I raced. I think it maybe marketing ploys by manufacturers of solvents that are spreading that information. Because not only average mechanics were using that method... that was the standard method used by many (if not most) team mechanics with Pro Tour level Professional teams.

And I have a hard time believing there is corrosive side effects from using Deisel... Just think about that for a second... if Deisel was so corrosive... how do Deisel motors last for 200, 300 500,000 miles in cars and trucks? When was the last time you saw corrosion in your engine compartment that was due to exposure to gas?.... You haven't.

I'll stick to my Coffee can full of Deisel thank you very much... now I just have to find a metal coffee can.
 

vspa

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Jan 11, 2009
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im with you, i still think about it as the best cleaning agent, i was just trying to understand why it is not used by cycling mechanics nowadays, maybe it could be dangerous for breathing or potentially explosive... i really don't know
 

ProdigalCyclist

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May 3, 2011
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vspa...

It may be due to the fact that EVERYTHING has gotten so commercialized now days. Professional (team) mechanics probably use what they are given to use, because that's the company that pays (some of) the bills. Just like riders use what they are given to use.

I don't know... at least the above may be part of it. I never, ever, ever, saw any type of ill effects from using deisel on a chain. Some moron pencile pusher from some citrus solvent manufacturer will probably tell you that gas is bad... but that's because gas is bad for HIS business.