~$250 US - Which XC fork?

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Slash, Feb 18, 2003.

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  1. Slash

    Slash Guest

    So I've been pondering this for about 6 hours straight now, doing the usual Google surfing, MTBR.com
    filtering and forum perusing. I'm hoping to upgrade my fork to something in the range of $200-250 US
    or so, but the sheer number of models out there make this a difficult decision.

    My bike setup is nothing impressive, but it's functional and it's all mine - a 2002 REI Novara
    Ponderosa FS. The frame is similar to that of a 2001/2002 K2 Attack or Jamis Dakar, for reference.
    The stock fork is a 2002 RockShox Judy C, with 80mm of glorious coil travel. I use the bike all the
    time on terrain that would probably be best described as rough XC. This time of year, the riding I
    do is on ski trails. Unfortunately it's been a rather mild winter with some near-freezing
    temperature seesaws, so the trails are strewn with millions of nice little ice ruts, frozen skid
    gouges, holes from people's feet and people's ski poles and, of course, moose.

    The riding conditions lately have prompted me to consider an upgrade. Some of the forks that seem to
    be in this range are (2002 or close) Marzocchi MXR's, MXC's, Dirt Jumpers, Z series, Manitou
    Black's, Rock Shock Duke's, etc... I'm looking for something with 100mm of travel (geometry should
    not be a problem, there are stem spacers and the saddle angle is adjustable) and v-brake bosses. I'm
    reading good things about the 2002 Marzocchi MXR, but then again I'm reading fairly good things
    about all of these forks. Is there any place that is having a clearance on specific 2002 forks that
    might fit my bill? I think I'm going insane from reading too much, maybe I'll just put them on a
    wheel, spin it and throw a dart at it. <ow, brain hurts>

    Short Attention Span Version: I've got $200-250 and do mostly bumpy XC. Cold is a factor at the
    moment, dunno if this is a consideration on fork type. 2002 Marzocchi MXR? 2002 Marzocchi MXC? 2001
    Z4? 2001 Z3? 2003 Dirt Jumper 2? EXR? Manitou Black Comp? RS Duke? Good? Bad? Plush? Sexy? Fugly?

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
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  2. Slash

    Slash Guest

    On Tue, 18 Feb 2003 09:54:30 -0900, James Connell <[email protected]> scribbled:

    >what is a factor (and you didn't mention) is your body weight and basic rideing style. an excelent
    >fork for a light rider can be a real POS for a guy over 200 lbs!

    6', 182lbs and dropping. :)

    My riding style is fairly straightforward. I don't do much intentional jumping, I don't do drops, I
    don't do urban assault...I don't abuse my bike - but I do use it. 13 miles a day on bumpy, icy,
    snowy ski trail. I more or less hunker down and hammer down. Trail cruising, I guess. I'm not trying
    to impress anyone, just riding for the fun and challenge of going new places, new terrains, farther
    and faster. Staying in shape is just a bonus. The classic non-competitive XC definition?

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
  3. David L

    David L Guest

    "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Short Attention Span Version: I've got $200-250 and do mostly bumpy XC. Cold is a factor at the
    > > moment, dunno if this is a consideration on fork type. 2002 Marzocchi MXR? 2002 Marzocchi MXC?
    > > 2001 Z4? 2001 Z3? 2003 Dirt Jumper 2? EXR? Manitou Black Comp? RS Duke? Good? Bad? Plush? Sexy?
    > > Fugly?
    > >
    > > -Slash
    >
    > I've had nothing but good times with a Black Elite - if you are looking at one, either get a 2003
    > or upgrade a 2002 with the Evil Genius seals.

    Whats with the Evil Genius seals, and why is it worth upgradng my 02 Black Elite? How much do the
    new seals go for, and can i do it myself?

    I am
    > also happy with an '02 RS Duke SL on my hardtail, but it doesn't compare
    to
    > the Black.
    >
    > Marzocchi forks are the most reliable, precise, and capapble forks around...if you can get
    > one, get it.
    >
    > You don't want a DirtJumper...'cause you're not dirt jumping or urban assaulting.
    >
    > For 2002 discounts, go to your LBSs and see what they can deal you, or
    check
    > out:
    >
    > jensonusa.com pricepoint.com supergo.com (last resort) cambriabike.com
    >
    > Chris
     
  4. Jd

    Jd Guest

  5. scottieski

    scottieski Guest

    >From: [email protected] (JD)

    >Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<6ou45voq9p8u1gc9fpnoi58u6csv3
    >[email protected]>... <snip>

    >Surly 1x1, $50. Use the rest of the money for a weekend riding somewhere cool.

    >JD

    Well will you look at that, Motorhead giving advice to Slash!
     
  6. Slash

    Slash Guest

    On Tue, 18 Feb 2003 23:21:25 -0500 (EST), [email protected] scribbled:

    >>From: [email protected] (JD)
    >
    >>Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:<6ou45voq9p8u1gc9fpnoi58u6csv3
    >>[email protected]>... <snip>
    >
    >>Surly 1x1, $50. Use the rest of the money for a weekend riding somewhere cool.
    >
    >>JD
    >
    >Well will you look at that, Motorhead giving advice to Slash!

    Hey, we like riding bikes too ya know.

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
  7. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 18 Feb 2003 09:54:30 -0900, James Connell <[email protected]> scribbled:
    >
    > >what is a factor (and you didn't mention) is your body weight and basic rideing style. an
    > >excelent fork for a light rider can be a real POS for a guy over 200 lbs!
    >
    > 6', 182lbs and dropping. :)
    >
    > My riding style is fairly straightforward. I don't do much intentional jumping, I don't do drops,
    > I don't do urban assault...I don't abuse my bike - but I do use it. 13 miles a day on bumpy, icy,
    > snowy ski trail. I more or less hunker down and hammer down. Trail cruising, I guess. I'm not
    > trying to impress anyone, just riding for the fun and challenge of going new places, new terrains,
    > farther and faster. Staying in shape is just a bonus. The classic non-competitive XC definition?

    Well, I can say ('cos it's true) I have the MXR SSVF coil/oil 100 (MXR = Z-3), and it's been great
    for the 10 months or so I've had it.

    Oh, and it seems tough.

    Shaun aRe
     
  8. Slash

    Slash Guest

    On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 12:42:33 -0000, "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> scribbled:

    >Well, I can say ('cos it's true) I have the MXR SSVF coil/oil 100 (MXR = Z-3), and it's been great
    >for the 10 months or so I've had it.
    >
    >Oh, and it seems tough.
    >
    >Shaun aRe

    How does it handle climbing? Hard front braking? Cold temperatures? Ice, snow, rain, mud & muck?

    The MXR is very likely what I'll end up ordering, unless my spontaneous side decides to order a 2002
    Marathon 100 from Speedgoat.com... they've got it on sale right now for $300, which seems like a
    damn fine price. And the Marathon is oh so damn sexy. I just don't know if I can justify the price
    difference.

    From what I've read on the net, a coil fork seems like the best suited for what I ride (fast bumpy
    semi-flat stuff, nothing too eXxXtReMe or outrageous), beating a typical air fork out in plushness.
    If I were doing jumps or downhill I suppose it'd be different, but I'm not.

    Though the Marathon does add one feature that seems quite useful - lockout. But is it worth the
    difference?

    -Slash
    --
    "Ebert Victorious"

    - The Onion
     
  9. Jd

    Jd Guest

    [email protected] wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >From: CK[email protected] (JD)
    >
    > >Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:<6ou45voq9p8u1gc9fpnoi58u6csv3
    > >[email protected]>... <snip>
    >
    > >Surly 1x1, $50. Use the rest of the money for a weekend riding somewhere cool.
    >
    > >JD
    >
    > Well will you look at that, Motorhead giving advice to Slash!

    That along with Howdy Doodoo humping their legs. How quaint and unexpected.

    JD
     
  10. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Slash wrote:

    >>Well, I can say ('cos it's true) I have the MXR SSVF coil/oil 100 (MXR = Z-3), and it's been great
    >>for the 10 months or so I've had it.
    >>
    >>Oh, and it seems tough.
    >>
    >
    > How does it handle climbing? Hard front braking? Cold temperatures? Ice, snow, rain, mud & muck?

    Although I've not had my MXR for as long as Shaun, mine has been through all of the above and I've
    been very impressed - no problems at all.

    > Though the Marathon does add one feature that seems quite useful - lockout. But is it worth the
    > difference?

    I'd say not, however, I've never felt the need for a lockout.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  11. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    Slash <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 19 Feb 2003 12:42:33 -0000, "Shaun Rimmer" <[email protected]> scribbled:
    >
    > >Well, I can say ('cos it's true) I have the MXR SSVF coil/oil 100 (MXR = Z-3), and it's been
    > >great for the 10 months or so I've had it.
    > >
    > >Oh, and it seems tough.
    > >
    > >Shaun aRe
    >
    > How does it handle climbing?

    That would depend on how you handle climbing - if you can go up, it will go up. It's a very
    capable fork.

    > Hard front braking?

    No probs for me. I have pulled the Hope Mini (big rotor - powerful) on quite fiercly, while going
    quickly over bumpy ground (stutter bumps, wet polished rocks etc.) and the fork seems to soak it all
    up, keeping the tyre well planted for good traction (no skipping/bouncing at all).

    > Cold temperatures?

    For a pre-breakfast snack matey - easy as pie, piece of piss, no problems at all.

    > Ice, snow, rain, mud & muck?

    Makes no odds to the fork - I live in the north of England, it gets plenty wet and messy around
    here, an the fork just seems to shrug it off - no wear or 'stiction' problem so far.

    > The MXR is very likely what I'll end up ordering, unless my spontaneous side decides to order a
    > 2002 Marathon 100 from Speedgoat.com... they've got it on sale right now for $300, which seems
    > like a damn fine price. And the Marathon is oh so damn sexy. I just don't know if I can justify
    > the price difference.
    >
    > From what I've read on the net, a coil fork seems like the best suited for what I ride (fast bumpy
    > semi-flat stuff, nothing too eXxXtReMe or outrageous), beating a typical air fork out in
    > plushness. If I were doing jumps or downhill I suppose it'd be different, but I'm not.

    I'd still go for a coil fork, in fact definately more so - stuff the weight difference, just revel
    in the extra reliabilty and suppleness of action.

    > Though the Marathon does add one feature that seems quite useful - lockout. But is it worth the
    > difference?

    I dunno - do you race up hills? Can you spin well? Do you know how to keep the front end down on
    steep climbs while maintaining rear wheel traction? I'm not brilliant at this stuff, but I've not
    found myself thinking "Oh feck - shoulda got a fork with lockout!" at any point, maybe "oh feck -
    need to improve my skills at this shit!"

    ',;~}

    Shaun aRe - As ever, these are only my opinions, which are cold, hard _fact_.
     
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