255 lbs a problem for Carbon Frame?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by steve26, Jul 14, 2005.

  1. kvl1027

    kvl1027 New Member

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    I am 6'4", 235lbs. What wheels would you recommend for someone my size. I ride on Bontrager Select wheels, 700x25c tires. I have notice that it Doesn't take much for my wheels to go out of true, and I ride on pretty smooth roads.
     


  2. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    I look out for my peeps! :D I don't really talk (or type) street slang but you get the idea.
     
  3. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    In this world there are wants and needs. CF is a want.

    Hey, if Lance is what it takes to get you back into taking care of yourself then that's great. He's been very inspirational for a number of people.

    It took me about 10 years to go from Greek god to a quivering blob of gelatinous flesh. :eek: I was once a fairly buff 195 - 200 lbs. That all changed when my lower back started hurting and I quit jogging and lifting weights. Bad move on my part. Although I haven't lost the weight yet I've lost quite a bit of subcutaneous fat and even have abs showing at 245 lbs of bodyweight. A couple more years and I may even have a 6 pack. Could be sooner but I'm not willing to cut out the pizza and beer. :D Some things are worth keeping!


    There are a lot of good bikes out there for $1500 and I think you'll be very happy with what you can find at that price range. The quality of components has improved quite a bit in the past decade to where even the lower end groups are better than the high end of the past, but don't take my word for it - this is directly from Sheldon Brown himself. If you stick around the equipment forum for any length of time you'll find out who he is.

    Bikes in that price range are anything from a very relaxed upright riding position, such as the Specialized Sequoia, to the more aggressive racing geometry and riding position. It's really a matter of personal choice of which you prefer. Just pick one that fits you better over one that looks cool and you'll be happier with it in the long run. They may be the same thing, but they may not.

    Accessories can run a couple hundred bucks pretty easily. One thing you may want to really check is pedals. Some have a wider platform and others don't. Some have quite a bit of float and others have about 4%. It's a very personal choice on pedals and you may want to just use some platforms until you've had a good chance to research them a bit. I use the Shimano MTB styled clipless on my MTB and road bikes as I wanted to be able to have 1 pair of shoes that do double duty. It probably isn't the "best" solution actually.

    From a guy who swore he would never wear lycra, cycling shorts are a must as are the helmet and gloves. I don't think these need to be top dollar items but opinions vary. You can often find a decent last year's helmet at closeout prices online for good prices (www.nashbar.com).

    Good luck with your new sport and good luck with your marathon. I don't know if that's a decent time or not but just being able to complete a marathon at 255 lbs sounds like quite an accomplishment to me.

    Enjoy.
     
  4. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Well-built 32 spoke wheels with 3-cross spokes ought to hold up a long time for you without a need for truing. I'd probably pick Mavic OP rims, with Ultegra hubs, and 14/15/14 or straight 14 gauge DT spokes and brass nipples, but there are other rim choices that might be even stronger.

    Daveornee is the expert wheelbuilder and seller here; if he responds, he may recommend other options.
     
  5. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    Hey toolshed, what do you think a forum is for? Why do you think the OP made his post? Why don't you go back to avoiding posting forums. :rolleyes:
     
  6. wilmar13

    wilmar13 New Member

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    My two cents as someone your size but about 60 lbs lighter in race trim is that you should look for something stiff above and beyond all else. Your weight and commensurate power, combined with the longer tubes of a frame that fits, will result in a noodle of a frame that in smaller sizes for smaller riders is quite stiff. I am not an expert in CF offerings, but if you have your heart set on it, just make sure you emphasize you need something crazy stiff.
     
  7. DaveB1234

    DaveB1234 New Member

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    You must have trouble reading as well. Apparently, you didn't see my follow-up post. But, whatever, you're probably some pencil necked geek sitting behind a keyboard...whatever. You know what they say about arguing over the internet...you must be the poster boy.
     
  8. DaveB1234

    DaveB1234 New Member

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    Thanks for the welcome -- I've been here a while but don't post that often -- I guess I went a bit overboard at the beginning of this thread.


    This is true; however, you could argue buyers remorse of not buying a carbon fiber at the onset.

    He very well may have changed his decision. The Felt is a good bike, but maybe not as good as some carbon fiber bikes -- especially considering his weight. I question the perceived value of the Felt (nice components, great price).

    Dave
     
  9. Shane422

    Shane422 New Member

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    I'm 255, 6'4" myself. I ride a steel Jamis Quest (2004) which was ~$1200. It has Mavic Cosmos wheels which are still true after 800 miles of imperfect pavement. I was a bit afraid of the reduced spoke count, but it hasn't been a problem so far.

    As a bigger rider, the steel felt smoother, and sturdier. There isn't a huge difference in weight either. The whole bike is still 19.5 lbs. I looked hard at Aluminum frames, including the Felt F60, and they felt bonejarring after testing a steel frame.
     
  10. Zasker1

    Zasker1 New Member

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    Just though I would put in my two cents. I have a Trek 5000 and weight around 230 and this has been a fantastic bike. I have about 3500miles on it now and the stock wheels have only needed to be trued three times. The stock Race series may be the bottem end but they are very well built. My only complant would be the rear wheel rubs against the brakes when I take a hard cornner, but overall this has been a fantastic bike. I have owned several treks, one of which was 6 years old when the frame failed at a weld and trek bought me a new one.
     
  11. John M

    John M New Member

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    So, I guess my point is this: if you are purchasing the frame and looking at it as a 5-10 year investment then carbon is probably not the best choice. If you are fully aware of carbons limitations in terms of care and lifespan,

    What is the basis of this sort of hooey? I have seen no objective data demonstrating that carbon fiber has a lower lifespan than any other frame material under general use.
     
  12. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    Trek must have a pretty generous warranty on their bikes. One guy on these forums just got a 12 year old OCLV frame with 31,000 miles replaced no questions asked.
     
  13. meehs

    meehs New Member

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    Has OCLV been around for that long? Wow! One thing I was going to point out is that one can't just say that "yeah, carbon is fine for a guy that size" or "No, carbon won't work for a guy that size". Some carbon frames would be fine and others won't. Carbon frames vary drastically from one manufacturer to another. Make sure you check manufacturers weight limits.
     
  14. Red2000SS

    Red2000SS New Member

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    I also have a Trek 5000 carbon bike. I am 6'3" 240lbs. I have probably about 5000 miles on it - great bike. In general at your weight you want to avoid lightweight anything... The Trek 5000 comes with Bontrager Race wheels - these aren't the lightest, but not bad and are really stout. I think the front spoke count is 20 and rear 24. I have had the rear wheel trued once and the front wheel trued once. The fact that the front wheel still even rolls is impressive... I had a bad crash about a year ago, where a car cut into my lane at a T intersection forcing me to go wide on a turn and in the process run over a 1" stick that flipped up and loldged in my front spokes! This is NOT good, do not try this! :D

    Basically the equivalent of someone jamming a broomstick into the spokes of a 240 lb rider doing 13mph - was already slowing to make turn...

    I instantly rotated over the handlebars and slammed into the concrete head/shoulder first :eek: . Head was fine - helmet was not, and I separated my shoulder, but the wheel was still ridable, but out of true some, with one spoke bent like a question mark, but no broken spokes - those are some tough spokes! Bike was also fine.

    LBS replaced one spoke and retrued the wheel.

    I think at your weight a good carbon bike is fine - just stay away from the super lightweight wheels, etc. - and do NOT run over any sticks!!!
     
  15. DMF

    DMF New Member

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    No, I wouldn't buy a carbon frame (and I didn't). Besides the scary absolute price, do a cost/benefit analysis.

    Ride comfort can be matched or bettered by a steel or steel/carbon frameset.

    In fact, the *only* thing CF gets you is lighter weight, and at your weight and experience level, that is a neglible if not nil difference.

    On the downside, CF durability long term is a risk. Racing frames (those of very low weight) aren't designed to last long-term. And a beefy rider like you would put considerably more stress on a frame - and in unexpected ways - than a pro.

    I'm 240 lbs, and I went with steel/carbon for exactly these reasons. The fact that I also saved $1500+ was a nice side benefit.
     
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