300 lbr bike buying recommendations



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John Schlesinge

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I just moved to a neighborhood with a bike trail(paved) right next door. Would like to start riding
again. Would like to know which bike(s) can handle the stress. Even when I was 220 I was hard on my
bikes. Thanks for your help. John
 
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Gary Smiley

Guest
If you're hard on bikes, then get a sturdy bike, like a mountain bike. Road bikes are build for
lightness, speed, and grace, but mountain bikes are made to take a pounding. If you want to ride
longer distances, perhaps a touring bike might do. And especially get good strong wheels, preferably
36 spokes, or even 40 (if you can get them). It's the wheels that take a beating more than the
frame. Good luck, and have fun!

John Schlesinger wrote:

> I just moved to a neighborhood with a bike trail(paved) right next door. Would like to start
> riding again. Would like to know which bike(s) can handle the stress. Even when I was 220 I was
> hard on my bikes. Thanks for your help. John
 
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Jon Isaacs

Guest
>I just moved to a neighborhood with a bike trail(paved) right next door. Would like to start riding
>again. Would like to know which bike(s) can handle the stress. Even when I was 220 I was hard on my
>bikes. Thanks for your help. John

My thinking is that just about any decent MTB can handle 300lbs. Find a good local bike shop that is
willing to take some time with you and you should be able to get something durable, reliable and
comfortable.

Jon
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"John Schlesinger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I just moved to a neighborhood with a bike trail(paved) right next door. Would like to start
> riding again. Would like to know which bike(s) can handle the stress. Even when I was 220 I was
> hard on my bikes.

The biggest issue at your weight will be wheels. Wheel strength/durability is as mostly a matter of
quality of build/prep more than $$, once you reach a certain (fairly low) threshold. You would
probably be OK with a mid-range mountain bike (swap knobby tires for slicks for pavement),
preferably with no suspension, since, at your weight, that'd be another problem. For a more road-ish
bike, and a little more money, you might look at either touring or autocross bikes. The former are
designed to carry rider and cargo loads, so are more beefy, the latter are designed to take off-road
wear & tear. You might get by with a hybrid or "comfort" bike, if that's more your style, but you'd
need to pick carefully and get good prep.

At your size, the support of a good bike shop will make the difference. They'll know what will work
& how to set it up. You may spend a few more bucks initially, but it'll be cheaper in the long run.
You'll need very well set up wheels, which means (in addition to beefy -- 36 spokes min, good hubs
and rims) high & uniform spoke tension and spoke stress relieving (read the section in the on-line
FAQ about wheels). A good shop will set you up right, then be there if you need support later.
 
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John Schlesinge

Guest
I originally thought Mountain Bike. But was not sure. What price range are we talking about? I would
like to spend less than 300-- before changing rims and moving to slicks. Can I get something for
that to get me started? John
 
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Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] (John Schlesinger) writes:
> I originally thought Mountain Bike. But was not sure. What price range are we talking about? I
> would like to spend less than 300-- before changing rims and moving to slicks. Can I get something
> for that to get me started? John

For your requirements and budget, I think a good starting point to look for could be a Trek 800
Sport. It pretty well has all the qualifications that Peter listed, and I think it's good value in
an inexpensive bike. Maybe check around at your local bike shops. Chances are, they'll have other
suggestions that are more suitable to you, as to how well whichever bikes they have fit you best,
etc. As I said, my suggestion (the 800 Sport) is only a starting point rather than an outright
recommendation.

cheers, Tom

--
-- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
[point] bc [point] ca
 
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John Schlesinge

Guest
Anyone else have any specific recommendations/preferences besides the TREK 800 Sport?
 
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Jon Isaacs

Guest
>Anyone else have any specific recommendations/preferences besides the TREK 800 Sport?

Go to your LBS and see what they have. The Trek 800 sport is an entry level bike and while it might
do the job, at 300 lbs you will be wanting strong wheels and hubs, probably better to pick a model
with Stainless Steel spokes and decent cassette hub. Some entry level bikes actually come with
freewheels, or at least they did a couple of years ago.

The Trek 800 also clamps the seat the way that Department store bikes do, at 300 lbs, you are likely
to have problems with the seat sliding and rotating back or forward.

At these price points, bikes are quite similar, the dealer is the difference. You need to find a
dealer who wants to take the time to get you on a bike that will work for you.

As others have said, you need to also make sure that the dealer understands the importance of
tensioning and stress relieiving the spokes. Normal wheels will handle your weight if they are
properly tensioned and stress relieved.

jon isaacs
 
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Bran Everseekin

Guest
[email protected] (John Schlesinger) spake thusly on or about Tue, 25 Feb 2003 18:39:04 UTC

-> I originally thought Mountain Bike. But was not sure. -> What price range are we talking about? I
would like to spend less than -> 300-- before changing rims and moving to slicks. Can I get
something -> for that to get me started? ->

a good rigid steel bike should come in in your price range. two years back I would have reccomended
the Marin Bolinas Ridge but it has become an alumnium thing since then. Mine has carried me from 390
down to 321 (last time i hit the scales)

If I had to replace my bike today I figure it would be a marin pine mountian and trade off the forks
for something more suited to my luddite sensibilities.

--
I hurt before the ride so fibro gives me a head start on the rest of the pack. silver lining?
[email protected]
 
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Bluto

Guest
[email protected] (Jon Isaacs) wrote:

> at 300 lbs you will be wanting strong wheels and hubs, probably better to pick a model with
> Stainless Steel spokes and decent cassette hub. Some entry level bikes actually come with
> freewheels, or at least they did a couple of years ago.

I agree. At the lower end of the price range, there are no threaded (freewheel) hubs than can stand
up to the forces imposed by a heavy rider. Find a bike model with 36 spoke wheels if there are any
still offered, because you may be able to keep the front wheel if you are lucky.

> As others have said, you need to also make sure that the dealer understands the importance of
> tensioning and stress relieving the spokes. Normal wheels will handle your weight if they are
> properly tensioned and stress relieved.

While I agree that the wheels should be hand tensioned and stress relieved by a knowledgeable
professional, I doubt that a stock rear wheel will show much longevity unless ridden
exceedingly gently.

I would plan to upgrade to a well-built 48 spoke rear wheel as soon as the stock rear wheel begins
to exhibit its inevitable problems.

I would also swap to slick tires right up front, lest the drag of knobbies on pavement become a
discouragement. But don't use skinny tires-- use 1.9" slicks to smooth the ride and protect your
wheels from damage.

The stock saddle on a new bike will be inadequate; have it replaced at the time of purchase.

Set up your bike so that the handlebars are no lower than the top of your saddle, then adjust from
there as your ride experiences dictate.

Chalo Colina
 
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Scottw44

Guest
Hi:

As many of you know I returned to the bike in 2000 at over 300 pounds.

I found a good LBS, and went with their recommendations.

A solid MTB, no suspension, will probably be a good fit. Fwiw, I rode a Trek 700, a hybrid w/ 700c
wheels. The shop retensioned the rear wheel to handle my size, and I was good to go.

This is a steel hybrid...there are also steel MTB's out there. My Dad just bought a steel Trek no
suspension MTB, my aunt purchased a steel no suspension Specialized.

So my thoughts are:

1. Steel
2. MTB
3. Maybe a hybrid w/ a good LBS

Here is the good news. I have been in the 170's for a couple of years. I watch what I eat and
cycle...no other exercise.

I now ride a Torelli Countach and just bought a set of 1400 gram wheels, wheels that would have
crumbled at the thought of my old weight.

3000 miles from June 1 through the end of 2000, 6600 miles for 01, 8000 last year. It can be done.
Now I love the bike and ride for sanity, exercise, and a way of life.

FInd something comfortable at a good shop, and build up slowly. Good luck...email if I can help.

scott

[email protected]
 
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John Schlesinge

Guest
Thanks for all those who have written. Emailed citybikes (washington DC) with my vital stats and
gave him a price of $350.. His response.... "I'm inclined to agree that your needs probably extend
beyond the typical entry level mountain bike or hybrid. Although we'd be happy to set you up with a
bike with a custom, high-spoke-count wheel, this would still leave us with durability issues with
the rest of the components. Also, it would push the price well above your stated budget. My best
suggestion is a bike Specialized makes called the P2, which is quite overbuilt. Unfortunately, this
bike retails for $585. I'd love to set you up and get you riding, but I'm not comfortable with the
durability of an entry-level bike for you."....

I looked at the bike on Specialized's Website. What a monster. Great looking. More than I want to
spend though. Do I really need that much bike? John
 
Z

>Zeke<

Guest
"John Schlesinger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I just moved to a neighborhood with a bike trail(paved) right next door. Would like to start
> riding again. Would like to know which bike(s) can handle the stress. Even when I was 220 I was
> hard on my bikes. Thanks for your help. John

John:

I weigh right now about 280. I am able to ride quite a lot on my bike with 32 spoke wheels I have
had problems on the rear with cheaper rims that don't have eyelets for the spokes, but none since I
switched over to a Sun CR-18 rim. You can check out my all around bike here:
http://home.rmci.net/idahocomputersolutions/Redline.htm

The bike weighs close to 33 lbs... but at my weight, so what? I'd see if you can find a well built
used tourer or MTB from the late 80's, preferably with 36 spoke wheels. Larger tires make a huge
difference as do good quality hubs.
 
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John Schlesinge

Guest
Anyone out there with knowledge of the Specialized P2? Excessive? Also my LBS recommended a Marin
LarkSpur-- under 400 bones. 36 spoke rims. The guy at Big Wheel Bikes in Alexandria Va. Seemed to
think the big would hold me without any modifications. I am not so sure after reading all the posts
from this thread. Ideas? Comments? John
 
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Bernie

Guest
John Schlesinger wrote:

> Anyone out there with knowledge of the Specialized P2? Excessive? Also my LBS recommended a Marin
> LarkSpur-- under 400 bones. 36 spoke rims. The guy at Big Wheel Bikes in Alexandria Va. Seemed to
> think the big would hold me without any modifications. I am not so sure after reading all the
> posts from this thread. Ideas? Comments? John

Hi John. I own a Marin Larkspur, 2001 model with rigid frame (no suspension 'cept the seatpost). I
weighed about 230 when I bought it, first week of September 2001. That was about 13000 miles ago. I
now weigh about 195, and the bike has been maintained regularly. I've broken several spokes,
replaced the rear rim, replaced both "GripShifters" - go for the rapid fire style thumb shifters -
and recently replaced the cogset and chain. The drive train replacement was perfectly normal
considering the hard rides my commute can bring (wet sand grinding everything). Overall I enjoy the
bike. Must say though, my 13 years old Norco Bush Pilot with 26" wheels and fatter tires has never
had a broken spoke. The Bush Pilot has met with lots of abuse, bush riding, curb jumping, riding
beside the railway right of way on ****, and after a complete rebuild this winter still feels great
and is "good to go". I'm betting that with your weight, you will benefit by a 26 inch wheel mountain
bike more than with a hybrid like the Larkspur. Mountain bike wheels are sturdier, because they use
smaller diameters (26 in) wheels, thicker spokes and rims that are designed to take impacts better.

PS: I am blindly assuming you want a useful "utility" type bicycle? Hope we are on the same page
here! Best regards, Bernie
 
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Steve McDonald

Guest
If I were you, I'd get a medium-priced, unsuspended mountain bike, that has sturdy rims and use it
as a road bike. I recommend Tioga City-Slicker, 26 X 1.95, smooth-tread tires for this purpose. I've
used this tire for years for road riding and they hold up well. Other brands have not done so well
for me. The wide tires and wheels with about 65 lbs. of pressure, would carry your weight more
efficiently, than a road bike with narrow ones and 100 lbs. psi. The 65 lbs. is all you need for
fast riding, with all the extra footprint these tires have. Such a setup is also more comfortable,
especially if you get a good padded and spring-loaded seat. I can go twice as far with my HyperPlush
seat, before the miseries begin.

Steve McDonald
 
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John Schlesinge

Guest
Thanks Bernie. Yes, i would like an all purpose bike. Sounds like my LBS overstated the Larkspur's
durability. Does anyone have opions on Iron Horse??
 
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Jon Isaacs

Guest
>Anyone out there tell me what year TREK 7000 is on Ebay. I am trying to get an idea to its value
>
>http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=27947&item=2715735
231&rd=1
>Thanks John

The guy has a starting bid of $249, wants you to pay shipping plus packing. This will put the bike
somewhere between $300 and $350.

It is also an 18.5 inch frame, which may or may not fit you, I am not sure, I am wondering if
you are???

The green and purple was a while ago as was STX, 5, 6, 7 years??

The fork in the photo looks more like a Trek Duo or some such thing rather than a Rock Shock Judy.

But I suggest caution when buying a MTB over the internet. For the sort of money you will be
spending for this bike, you could buy a decent entry level bike that comes with a warranty and is
not potentially worn out.

This is not to say that this is not a good bike, or that buying bikes used is not a good thing,
rather, it is good to see the bike in person and not pay a premium price for an older bike.

My guess is that Mike J, could put a date on this bike quite nicely.

jon isaacs
 
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