3000 miles in 10 months... so Why am I still fat?



B

Bernie

Guest
Pbwalther wrote:

>>Well, for much of human history people were lean indeed on
>>a diet of
>> > >complex carbs, mainly in the form of grains,
>> > >vegetables and very little animal protein. It is quite
>> > >easy to have a diet like that and be quite lean.
>> > humans only started eating grains when we learned to
>> > cultivate. we did not evolve eating grains.
>>
>>
>>But how long has cultivation been around? This is not a
>>new technology or anything and the planet wasnt overall
>>fat a 100 to 200 years ago.
>>
>>
>Cultivation is believed to have started near the fertile
>crescent. I believe that it happened about 7,000 years ago.
>Cultivation spread from that place and in some cases, like
>mesoamerica, it seems to have been discovered
>independently.
>
Cultivation is just an efficient way to amass a lot of
seeds. Wasn't it done because seeds were always an important
food? Our teeth and guts say we are seed eaters from way
back before cultivation. (Grain and locusts... yum!!) Bernie
 
R

Rick Onanian

Guest
On 26 May 2004 13:39:05 GMT, [email protected] (Pbwalther) wrote:
>The thing is if you look at the diets in many 3rd world
>nations, the people are lean. They eat very little fat or
>animal protein. They eat a lot of whole grains and
>vegetables.

No, they don't eat a lot of grains and vegetables. They
don't eat a lot of anything. If they did, they'd probably
not be 3rd world.

>Also their diabetes and heart disease rates are very low.

I'm shooting from the hip here, but I'd guess they die
pretty young, before those diseases set in.

>So the diet is certainly healthy. It is much more healthy
>then what passes for a diet in the land of the big mac.

I'd like to see some numbers before I believe that 3rd world
people are healthier than people in the US.

Big macs are icky, though. Most people don't realize it
because there's so much garbage on top of the "meat" that
they can't taste the "meat".
--
Rick Onanian
 
D

David Kerber

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...
> On 26 May 2004 13:39:05 GMT, [email protected]
> (Pbwalther) wrote:
> >The thing is if you look at the diets in many 3rd world
> >nations, the people are lean. They eat very little fat or
> >animal protein. They eat a lot of whole grains and
> >vegetables.
>
> No, they don't eat a lot of grains and vegetables. They
> don't eat a lot of anything. If they did, they'd probably
> not be 3rd world.
>
> >Also their diabetes and heart disease rates are very low.
>
> I'm shooting from the hip here, but I'd guess they die
> pretty young, before those diseases set in.
>
> >So the diet is certainly healthy. It is much more healthy
> >then what passes for a diet in the land of the big mac.
>
> I'd like to see some numbers before I believe that 3rd
> world people are healthier than people in the US.

They aren't; they just have _different_ health problems,
typically caused by poor nutrition and sanitation.

....

--
Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in
the newsgroups if possible).
 
R

Rick Onanian

Guest
>>I'd like to see some numbers before I believe that 3rd
>>world people are healthier than people in the US.
On 27 May 2004 13:25:12 GMT, [email protected]
(Pbwalther) wrote:
>I didn't say they were healthier.

Well, then that's the life for me! Less health, no job, no
fun, swatting flies off my sweaty ass all day, but I get to
enjoy that life for longer!

Where do I sign up?
--
Rick Onanian
 
C

clb

Guest
Hi Doug,

Here's my take. I think you are eating too much. As some
others have said, exercise alone does not take off weight.
Your body's natural response to a drop in blood sugar from
exercising is to get hungrier, so typically people simply
replace the used calories by eating more.

What to do? First, if you want to use cycling to help you
lose weight you have to do a specific kind of workout. When
you deplete your body of sugar you become hungry. So, the
way to exercise if you want to lose weight is long and
slow. Don't sprint or do hills or anything that will get
your heart rate up. Do long flat slow relaxed rides. This
way your body will be better able to keep its sugar level
up for the entire ride. I've heard women call it "fat
burning" but the concept is basically to burn calories
while avoiding hunger.

The other thing is you have to change your life style so you
eat less. Everyone does it differently, but basically you
have to learn to feel good when you are a little hungry, and
not make food the highlight of your day. Don't starve
yourself because that's hard for anyone to keep up. It's too
painful. Just slowly, day by day, watch your eating and
reduce it bit by bit. It's okay to eat a big meal sometimes,
just not every day. Think about it like a car's gas tank. If
you fill it up one day there's no need to fill it up again
the next. After a little while your stomach will shrink a
bit and you will feel full with less food, and you will
slowly start losing weight. I'd aim for about a couple
pounds per month or so. More would be nice but can be too
painful. Since it takes about 3500 calories of excess food
to gain a pound of weight, this means you will be eating
about 200 calories less per day, which is about what's in a
large soft drink, so shouldn't be too painful. Note that in
the first few weeks you may lose weight faster but that is
partly because your system will empty out a bit as you eat
less, so it's not real weight loss. At that rate you will be
back to your former weight in a few years, and by that time
you will be entirely used to your new eating habits such
that they feel normal.

Good luck!

CLB

On Tue, 18 May 2004 22:16:03 -0600, "Doug Cook"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>The story thus far....

[story snipped]
 

Insight Driver

New Member
Jun 26, 2003
494
1
0
69
Originally posted by Gooserider
I don't want to sound harsh, but something is evidently
wrong with your diet. You're burning calories by doing your
cardio, so you must be consuming more calories than you
burn. Have you tried incorporating strength training? You'll
burn more calories with more muscle.

Did you read Chris's statement? He kindly gave facts and advice.
 

fuzzball

New Member
Sep 23, 2003
2
0
0
First....I was an "obese" person myself once (and you qualify as obese at this point). So I come from that side of the "fence" so to speak.

Secondly....get "real" with yourself. When you gain weight you are consuming more calories than you burn. To lose weight you need to burn more calories than you consume. The "concept" is quite simple and don't let anyone tell you that it is any more difficult a concept than that....IT ISN'T! Now....how many calories are YOU burning a day? I have no idea...but it is more that what I burn per day....

Thirdly....you may "think" you are only consuming 2500 calories per day...but we are whoafully inadequate and properly "guessing" how much we are consuming. A study was done on morbidly obese people....they kept a food diary of the amount and types of food they were eating and then asked to write down how many calories they "thought" they were consuming.

Well??? guess what??? it was WAYYYYYY off. On average they were consuming 8000 calories per day and only thought they were consuming 2500-3000 calories per day.


The fact is this.....you lost 5lbs...which means that you burned in 10 months 17500 calories total over what you consumed. Each pound of fat is 3500 calories. You lost 1/2 lb per month. Most dieticians would reccomend only 1-2lbs per month.....the slower you loss the weight the better chance you have of keeping it off.

Fourthly....it took you 12 years to put on 99lbs....that's 8.25lbs per year on average you gained over the 12 year period.

Don't expect something that took you 12 years to put on to come off overnight....it takes time. If it takes you 3 years to lose the weight....it takes you 3 years....be happy about that. You'll be better off for it and more likely to keep it off.

Ride more if you can. you are only averaging about 75 miles per week. Shoot for more like 150 miles per week if you can....or 10-12 hours of exercise....low intensity....long duration. Based on the number of miles you are putting in at a conservative 17mph avg speed you are only putting in 4.5 hours of exercise a week. Most weightloss experts say at LEAST 6-7 hours....and I say 10-12.




Originally posted by Doug Cook
The story thus far....

12 years ago - single, 6'3", 180lbs., hair, and competing in
citizens class triathlons.

Fast forward to last July... Married, two kids, mortgage, no
hair, sedentary, 279lbs.

Sick of that fat man in the mirror, I bought some XXL
cycling clothes, dusted off and tuned up my old Trek, and
started riding again. Now 10 months and close to 3000 miles
later... I still weigh 274! I mean... come on! 3000 miles
for 5 pounds?!

My fitness level has increased tremendously. I use to
struggle on 10 mile rides. Now I do at least 3-4 weekday
rides of 15-30 miles each and one weekend ride for 50-70
miles - all solo. My computer puts my average speed for
these rides between 16-18mph depending upon the particular
ups&downs of the ride. My HRM says my average rate is
usually right about 75% of max (although that can vary,
usually on the high side, when the ride has climbing). I
feel lean and mean while I ride, but when I get home I
wonder who that fat guy in the mirror is!

I don't diet per se, but I do eat sensibly. The days that
I've tracked my caloric intake it's usually right between
2500 - 3000. One friend who is a "wellness" expert suggests
I'm not eating *ENOUGH*. Although she readily admits she
doesn't specialize in athletes ("slovenly couch potato" is
how she describes her typical client), she says that with my
activity level my BMR is 5300... as she explained it that's
the number of calories needed to just maintain my weight!
Therefore she thinks my body thinks it's being starved and
refuses to let go of the fat. She thinks by eating MORE the
body will move away from this starvation reflex and start
shedding pounds. She also suggested riding easy first thing
in the morning BEFORE breakfast so the body has to switch to
fat because the glycogen stores will be low (sound like a
recipe for the BONK to me).

Well, I tried to eat 4000 calories today and about died! I
felt horrible, stuffed, tired, etc. I tried riding with
just water (no sport drink), and found myself craving sugar
after the ride.

Any experts lurking out there that would like to comment?
Are there any coaching services online that could help
customize my training to help me lose weight? I can't afford
to hire a coach.
 

limerickman

Well-Known Member
Jan 5, 2004
16,130
110
63
Originally posted by fuzzball
First....I was an "obese" person myself once (and you qualify as obese at this point). So I come from that side of the "fence" so to speak.

Secondly....get "real" with yourself. When you gain weight you are consuming more calories than you burn. To lose weight you need to burn more calories than you consume. The "concept" is quite simple and don't let anyone tell you that it is any more difficult a concept than that....IT ISN'T! Now....how many calories are YOU burning a day? I have no idea...but it is more that what I burn per day....

Thirdly....you may "think" you are only consuming 2500 calories per day...but we are whoafully inadequate and properly "guessing" how much we are consuming. A study was done on morbidly obese people....they kept a food diary of the amount and types of food they were eating and then asked to write down how many calories they "thought" they were consuming.

Well??? guess what??? it was WAYYYYYY off. On average they were consuming 8000 calories per day and only thought they were consuming 2500-3000 calories per day.


The fact is this.....you lost 5lbs...which means that you burned in 10 months 17500 calories total over what you consumed. Each pound of fat is 3500 calories. You lost 1/2 lb per month. Most dieticians would reccomend only 1-2lbs per month.....the slower you loss the weight the better chance you have of keeping it off.

Fourthly....it took you 12 years to put on 99lbs....that's 8.25lbs per year on average you gained over the 12 year period.

Don't expect something that took you 12 years to put on to come off overnight....it takes time. If it takes you 3 years to lose the weight....it takes you 3 years....be happy about that. You'll be better off for it and more likely to keep it off.

Ride more if you can. you are only averaging about 75 miles per week. Shoot for more like 150 miles per week if you can....or 10-12 hours of exercise....low intensity....long duration. Based on the number of miles you are putting in at a conservative 17mph avg speed you are only putting in 4.5 hours of exercise a week. Most weightloss experts say at LEAST 6-7 hours....and I say 10-12.




Originally posted by Doug Cook
The story thus far....

12 years ago - single, 6'3", 180lbs., hair, and competing in
citizens class triathlons.

Fast forward to last July... Married, two kids, mortgage, no
hair, sedentary, 279lbs.

Sick of that fat man in the mirror, I bought some XXL
cycling clothes, dusted off and tuned up my old Trek, and
started riding again. Now 10 months and close to 3000 miles
later... I still weigh 274! I mean... come on! 3000 miles
for 5 pounds?!

My fitness level has increased tremendously. I use to
struggle on 10 mile rides. Now I do at least 3-4 weekday
rides of 15-30 miles each and one weekend ride for 50-70
miles - all solo. My computer puts my average speed for
these rides between 16-18mph depending upon the particular
ups&downs of the ride. My HRM says my average rate is
usually right about 75% of max (although that can vary,
usually on the high side, when the ride has climbing). I
feel lean and mean while I ride, but when I get home I
wonder who that fat guy in the mirror is!

I don't diet per se, but I do eat sensibly. The days that
I've tracked my caloric intake it's usually right between
2500 - 3000. One friend who is a "wellness" expert suggests
I'm not eating *ENOUGH*. Although she readily admits she
doesn't specialize in athletes ("slovenly couch potato" is
how she describes her typical client), she says that with my
activity level my BMR is 5300... as she explained it that's
the number of calories needed to just maintain my weight!
Therefore she thinks my body thinks it's being starved and
refuses to let go of the fat. She thinks by eating MORE the
body will move away from this starvation reflex and start
shedding pounds. She also suggested riding easy first thing
in the morning BEFORE breakfast so the body has to switch to
fat because the glycogen stores will be low (sound like a
recipe for the BONK to me).

Well, I tried to eat 4000 calories today and about died! I
felt horrible, stuffed, tired, etc. I tried riding with
just water (no sport drink), and found myself craving sugar
after the ride.

Any experts lurking out there that would like to comment?
Are there any coaching services online that could help
customize my training to help me lose weight? I can't afford
to hire a coach.

FuzzBall : I agree with the points that you posted - albeit, you put
your points in a very stark way.
But there is no other conclusion except the one that you come to.

Credit where it's due though 3000 miles is a great achievement.
Like other posters here we want to see these 3000 miles pay
a dividend (ie the lose of weight).

Cut down the calorie intake.
 

kevcain

New Member
Sep 23, 2003
7
0
0
Originally posted by Doug Cook
The story thus far....

12 years ago - single, 6'3", 180lbs., hair, and competing in
citizens class triathlons.

Fast forward to last July... Married, two kids, mortgage, no
hair, sedentary, 279lbs.

Sick of that fat man in the mirror, I bought some XXL
cycling clothes, dusted off and tuned up my old Trek, and
started riding again. Now 10 months and close to 3000 miles
later... I still weigh 274! I mean... come on! 3000 miles
for 5 pounds?!

My fitness level has increased tremendously. I use to
struggle on 10 mile rides. Now I do at least 3-4 weekday
rides of 15-30 miles each and one weekend ride for 50-70
miles - all solo. My computer puts my average speed for
these rides between 16-18mph depending upon the particular
ups&downs of the ride. My HRM says my average rate is
usually right about 75% of max (although that can vary,
usually on the high side, when the ride has climbing). I
feel lean and mean while I ride, but when I get home I
wonder who that fat guy in the mirror is!

I don't diet per se, but I do eat sensibly. The days that
I've tracked my caloric intake it's usually right between
2500 - 3000. One friend who is a "wellness" expert suggests
I'm not eating *ENOUGH*. Although she readily admits she
doesn't specialize in athletes ("slovenly couch potato" is
how she describes her typical client), she says that with my
activity level my BMR is 5300... as she explained it that's
the number of calories needed to just maintain my weight!
Therefore she thinks my body thinks it's being starved and
refuses to let go of the fat. She thinks by eating MORE the
body will move away from this starvation reflex and start
shedding pounds. She also suggested riding easy first thing
in the morning BEFORE breakfast so the body has to switch to
fat because the glycogen stores will be low (sound like a
recipe for the BONK to me).

Well, I tried to eat 4000 calories today and about died! I
felt horrible, stuffed, tired, etc. I tried riding with
just water (no sport drink), and found myself craving sugar
after the ride.

Any experts lurking out there that would like to comment?
Are there any coaching services online that could help
customize my training to help me lose weight? I can't afford
to hire a coach.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Hi Doug,

January 1, 2002 I weighed 325 lbs. That day I stopped eating all fast food (except Subway). I also began riding 3 days a week with my local bike club. Each ride was between 30-35 miles and 2 out of 3 days were rolling hills. March 1st I joined Weight Watchers. Sept. 6th I was 65 lbs lighter and still losing. I now float between 240 & 250, can outride most of the people in the club, climb like a scalded billy goat, never felt more fit in my life, and still write down every bite that goes into my mouth.

Weight Watchers helped me learn about my eating habits, helped me develope new "taste buds" so to speak, and ultimately make a lifestyle change that is now permanent. I eat what I want anytime of the day or night. I simply control the portions and plan ahead what I intend to eat. Check it out. It works.

I've added to the equation now by using a "Total Gym" on my off bike days. This adds the necessary strenth training to the program and only takes 15 minutes a day (Tues, Thurs, & Sun.). I do a short "recovery" ride on Sunday before the "Total Gym" to help get my heart rate up.

Lastly, if you do this program, make sure to keep your intensity up. Set goals to increase your average by x on each ride. Ride with faster people. Train with a race team 1 x per week. Find other "Clydesdales" to ride with and hold individual time trials amongst yourselves. You learn more when you teach so even if you don't think they ride well, you can help them by teaching them to do what you do and it will motivate them to motivate you!

Let me know how you progress.

Good luck,

Kev
 
P

Per ElmsäTer

Guest
fuzzball wrote:
> Secondly....get "real" with yourself. When you gain weight
> you are consuming more calories than you burn. To lose
> weight you need to burn more calories than you consume.
> The "concept" is quite simple and

Yep calories in versus calories out. I don't lose a single
kilo anymore because I eat as much as I burn

> putting in 4.5 hours of exercise a week. Most weightloss
> experts say at LEAST 6-7 hours....and I say 10-12.
>

Plus. Your fatburning engine doesn't really get started
until after about 45-60 minutes. Hence it is better to do a
couple of really long rides rather than a bunch of rides
shorter than an hour.

--
Perre

You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
 

koss78

New Member
May 23, 2004
8
0
0
just wondering, how come u let yourself get all lazy when u get married? is that horrible curse that comes when u get marriedn and get kids? if so i dont tihnk i will ever get married at all?








QUOTE]Originally posted by Doug Cook
The story thus far....

12 years ago - single, 6'3", 180lbs., hair, and competing in
citizens class triathlons.

Fast forward to last July... Married, two kids, mortgage, no
hair, sedentary, 279lbs.

Sick of that fat man in the mirror, I bought some XXL
cycling clothes, dusted off and tuned up my old Trek, and
started riding again. Now 10 months and close to 3000 miles
later... I still weigh 274! I mean... come on! 3000 miles
for 5 pounds?!

My fitness level has increased tremendously. I use to
struggle on 10 mile rides. Now I do at least 3-4 weekday
rides of 15-30 miles each and one weekend ride for 50-70
miles - all solo. My computer puts my average speed for
these rides between 16-18mph depending upon the particular
ups&downs of the ride. My HRM says my average rate is
usually right about 75% of max (although that can vary,
usually on the high side, when the ride has climbing). I
feel lean and mean while I ride, but when I get home I
wonder who that fat guy in the mirror is!

I don't diet per se, but I do eat sensibly. The days that
I've tracked my caloric intake it's usually right between
2500 - 3000. One friend who is a "wellness" expert suggests
I'm not eating *ENOUGH*. Although she readily admits she
doesn't specialize in athletes ("slovenly couch potato" is
how she describes her typical client), she says that with my
activity level my BMR is 5300... as she explained it that's
the number of calories needed to just maintain my weight!
Therefore she thinks my body thinks it's being starved and
refuses to let go of the fat. She thinks by eating MORE the
body will move away from this starvation reflex and start
shedding pounds. She also suggested riding easy first thing
in the morning BEFORE breakfast so the body has to switch to
fat because the glycogen stores will be low (sound like a
recipe for the BONK to me).

Well, I tried to eat 4000 calories today and about died! I
felt horrible, stuffed, tired, etc. I tried riding with
just water (no sport drink), and found myself craving sugar
after the ride.

Any experts lurking out there that would like to comment?
Are there any coaching services online that could help
customize my training to help me lose weight? I can't afford
to hire a coach.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.
[/QUOTE]
 
S

S O R N I

Guest
koss78 top-posted:

> just wondering, how come u let yourself get all lazy when
> u get married? is that horrible curse that comes when u
> get marriedn and get kids? if so i dont tihnk i will ever
> get married at all?

Was that the gene pool I saw doing a little dance?

Bill "great headphones, though, back in the day" S.
 

Thatch

New Member
May 21, 2004
18
0
0
60
Originally posted by Doug Cook
The story thus far....

12 years ago - single, 6'3", 180lbs., hair, and competing in
citizens class triathlons.

Fast forward to last July... Married, two kids, mortgage, no
hair, sedentary, 279lbs.

Sick of that fat man in the mirror, I bought some XXL
cycling clothes, dusted off and tuned up my old Trek, and
started riding again. Now 10 months and close to 3000 miles
later... I still weigh 274! I mean... come on! 3000 miles
for 5 pounds?!

My fitness level has increased tremendously. I use to
struggle on 10 mile rides. Now I do at least 3-4 weekday
rides of 15-30 miles each and one weekend ride for 50-70
miles - all solo. My computer puts my average speed for
these rides between 16-18mph depending upon the particular
ups&downs of the ride. My HRM says my average rate is
usually right about 75% of max (although that can vary,
usually on the high side, when the ride has climbing). I
feel lean and mean while I ride, but when I get home I
wonder who that fat guy in the mirror is!

I don't diet per se, but I do eat sensibly. The days that
I've tracked my caloric intake it's usually right between
2500 - 3000. One friend who is a "wellness" expert suggests
I'm not eating *ENOUGH*. Although she readily admits she
doesn't specialize in athletes ("slovenly couch potato" is
how she describes her typical client), she says that with my
activity level my BMR is 5300... as she explained it that's
the number of calories needed to just maintain my weight!
Therefore she thinks my body thinks it's being starved and
refuses to let go of the fat. She thinks by eating MORE the
body will move away from this starvation reflex and start
shedding pounds. She also suggested riding easy first thing
in the morning BEFORE breakfast so the body has to switch to
fat because the glycogen stores will be low (sound like a
recipe for the BONK to me).

Well, I tried to eat 4000 calories today and about died! I
felt horrible, stuffed, tired, etc. I tried riding with
just water (no sport drink), and found myself craving sugar
after the ride.

Any experts lurking out there that would like to comment?
Are there any coaching services online that could help
customize my training to help me lose weight? I can't afford
to hire a coach.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Congrats are in order for you. There is a good book out by Lance Armstrong and Chris Carmichael it's called 7 weeks to the perfect ride. The book contains info for all levels with eating plans and workout rides and so forth. But; Have you had a complete physical by your MD. You mat have a chemical imballance of some sort. I think it is worth looking into, who knows. Keep on riding.:D
 
H

Hieronymus

Guest
"Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> fuzzball wrote:
snippage...
> Plus. Your fatburning engine doesn't really get started
> until after about 45-60 minutes. Hence it is better to do
> a couple of really long rides
rather
> than a bunch of rides shorter than an hour.
>
> --
> Perre
Please give a scientific citation for this information. I've
heard this for years and I am still sceptical that this old
piece of cycling advice is true. I have read obesity
journals and other professional literature and I cannot
evidence for this claim. Thank You, Hieronymus
 

Insight Driver

New Member
Jun 26, 2003
494
1
0
69
> Perre
Please give a scientific citation for this information. I've
heard this for years and I am still sceptical that this old
piece of cycling advice is true. I have read obesity
journals and other professional literature and I cannot
evidence for this claim. Thank You, Hieronymus [/B][/QUOTE]

You are online are you not? Use your own search skills and educate yourself, why don't you? What Pierre posted is factual, not lore. Rather than task someone else to prove it to YOU, why don't you go find out for yourself? At the very least, put in enough effort to try to prove him wrong or admit he's right.
 

EvilDog

New Member
Mar 29, 2004
2
0
0
Let me make a few suggestions here.

1) You will need to do your riding to burn fat and not carbs. This is done by riding at a completely comfortable aerobic pace and not anaerobically. This means that you will have to pedal more easily and at a lower heart rate. Try staying at about 65% of your max for the duration of your ride. No showing off, no heroics. Avoid sprinting and fast paces. Just keep it easy. The harder you ride, the more your muscles will depend on burning carbs and not fat. This is why you are having a strong sugar craving after your ride. Also you will want to up your daily intake of protein if you haven't already done so.

2) You should also condition your body to become a fat burner and not a carb burner by NOT eating for the 2 - 3 hours prior to riding. This will take some will power on your part but it will do the trick. Don't worry about bonking. This is not going to happen if you keep your riding pace in the comfortable aerobic range as I suggest. You will have to trust me on this. Truthfully, even a rider who has just 1% body fat and weighs only 100 lbs has 1 lb of fat on board for fuel. At a calorie count of 9 cal per gram of fat, this means that this super lean person has (458 grams x 9 cal) = 4000+ calories available to him. At a relaxed pace translates into 8 - 10 hours of steady riding. So, you certainly don't have to worry about bonking. You will have to perhaps deal with a grumbling stomach but that will go away with time. I know, this is what I do. In fact I find that when I ride with food in my stomach I am really quite sluggish until an hour or so passes and I have burned off the food that is still in my system. Now when I ride with my buddied I just smile at them when they complain of hunger pains after three hours on the road and I am still fine and going strong and not hungry at all. It really does work, you will just have to give it a try. Just don't expect to see this effect over night, give it a few weeks to take effect.

3) you are going to have to up your daily ride to about 2 hours per day minimum. A 15 mile ride is not going to do much for you. Try to make it about 30 miles per day and don't worry about the one day where you do your 50 - 60 miler. You will be better off by maintaining a steady daily schedule of riding and not occillating your distances up and down so much. This will get your body into a regular rhythm and it will know what to expect from one day to the next.

4) When climbing, don't be a macho dude. Break down and use a triple. Even go to the point where you are running a 12 - 27 cassette in the back. You want to spin your way up the hills. I know that it can be hard to keep from getting your heart rate up there when climbing, just try to keep the increase to a minimum by following this advice. So long as the majority of your ride (90 - 95%) is at the 65% heart rate level, you will be fine with this and you will be a fat burner.

5) Now my final tip is to recover properly after each ride. You will have burned up some amount of glycogen in your muscles and you will want to replace this properly so you are able to go at it the next day w/o feeling ragged out. This will mean consuming carbs and protein at a 75% carb and 25% protein mix. DO NOT consume any fat at this time because this will interfere with the effectiveness of your recovery which is dependant on insuline doing its thing. Fat acts as an insuline inhibitor and will cause the regeneration of your muscle glycogen to be hampered.

For your body weight and limiting your workouts to just comfortable aerobic ones, I would suggest about 25 grams of protein and 75 grams of carbs within the first 30 minutes after each workout. A good economical way to do this is to consume one scoop of weigh protein powder mixed in water and then chase it down with 24 oz of Hi-C or Hawiian Punch. This will give you the perfect proportion that I am advising here. You should also take a couple of multi vitamins at this time. This will all go a long way to getting your body properly recovered after your ride.

DO NOT take Gatorade after a ride. It has so little in the way of carbs you will have to drink about 60 oz of it to get the same effect. (This is almost 1/2 gallon) Since your body can only absorb water at the rate of about 1 liter per hour, this will radically slow the rate that the carbs are absorbed by your system not to mention the fact that you will have a bloated stomach from drinking so much! Also, don't be sold on the supposed electrolytes that Gatorade offers. The most important ones are Salt and Potassium which will be more than pleantiful in your regular diet. A single 8 oz glass of orange juice has many times more potassium than Gatorade ever thought of. Gatorade is a marketing ploy to part you from your money.

The bottom line is that carbs is carbs is carbs. Hi-C and Hawiian Punch has it in spades and in a form that your body will readily absorb for half the cost of traditional sports drinks by the gallon not to mention the fact that you only have to drink half as much(or less) to get the same effect.

Hope this helps and good luck with your cycling and weight loss.
 
H

Hieronymus

Guest
"Insight Driver" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> > Perre
> Please give a scientific citation for this information.
> I've heard this for years and I am still sceptical that
> this old piece of cycling advice is true. I have read
> obesity journals and other professional literature and I
> cannot evidence for this claim. Thank You, Hieronymus
>
> You are online are you not? Use your own search skills and
> educate yourself, why don't you? What Pierre posted is
> factual, not lore. Rather than task someone else to prove
> it to YOU, why don't you go find out for yourself? At the
> very least, put in enough effort to try to prove him wrong
> or admit he's right.
>

Insight Driver, Read my question a wee bit closer. I did not
write anyone is right or wrong. Nor did I ask anyone to
prove anything to me. I wrote that I have tried to find
scientific validation of the fact in question (did you not
see the part about reading journals?). I cannot find any
studies online or not online to validate the fat burning
question. All I did was ask Perre to give me a little help.
You are the one who said it is factual, how do you know it
to be factual? Like any good scholar would do, give me a
site or journal reference to show the case for your point
since I am unable to come up with any proof on my own.
 

iancar

New Member
Apr 24, 2004
1
0
0
93
Originally posted by Doug Cook
The story thus far....

>Sick of that fat man in the mirror, I bought some XXL
>cycling clothes, dusted off and tuned up my old Trek, and
>started riding again. Now 10 months and close to 3000 miles
>later... I still weigh 274! I mean... come on! 3000 miles
>for 5 pounds?!

Six months ago I decided to do something about my figure. During that six months I have followed the Atkins diet although I have substituted more vegetable oils than anial fats.

I am a 75 year old male and my weight had remained on 75 kgms. for as long as I can rememeber despite what ever I tried in the way of tryng to lose some weight. Finally, my back gave out (genetic) and nothing could be done except alter my shape.

For several years I had swum 1000 metres every day and my shoulders and legs were strong and well formed but I had this fat guts in the middle. After starting Atkins (with my GP's approval and cooperation) within a fortnight I had lost 15cms. off my middle and about 5 kgms. off my weight. Currently, I have stabilized my weight at 70 kgms and a total of 20cms. off my middle. (My waist is 97cms and my hips 99cms). My BMI is 25.1 which is fine for my build.

These days I find the maintenance diet very easy to live with. As well my blood pressure is less than 120/55, my cholestrol ratio, my sugar levels and my triglicerides have all been retored to less than normal for me. And in fact most of the drugs I was on have been deleted.

A recent TV programme provided a list of medical studies (Mostly from Duke University) which showed that these reductions are a normal result of the diet and that protien acts as a hunger suppresent. In fact despite all the hype this is how the low carbohydrate/high protien diets work.

My energy levels are high, my cardiologist carried out recent tests on me and told me that he could not fault my heart and that the clogged arteries that I had suffered from were showing signs of clearing. He finally said I dont want to see you for eighteen months. Previously I had suffered from angina with clogged arteries but since getting on the diet have had no signs of angina pains nor have I had any TIA's which were a frequent occurence. I even had a stroke about two years ago.

So that is what I did.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 
P

Per ElmsäTer

Guest
Hieronymus wrote:
> "Per Elmsäter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
>> fuzzball wrote:
> snippage...
>> Plus. Your fatburning engine doesn't really get started
>> until after about 45-60 minutes. Hence it is better to do
>> a couple of really long rides rather than a bunch of
>> rides shorter than an hour.
>>
>> --
>> Perre
> Please give a scientific citation for this information.
> I've heard this for years and I am still sceptical that
> this old piece of cycling advice is true. I have read
> obesity journals and other professional literature and I
> cannot evidence for this claim. Thank You, Hieronymus

You know. It's not like I've been studying scientific
abstracts that I can link you to. This is information that
I've gathered at coaching seminars and other training
related educatin that I've gone through. Try reading
training related journals instead of obesity journals. One
reason pro cyclists are interested in this is because they
want to train in such a fashion that they learn to utilize
fat for energy rather than carbs. One way of achieving this
is to have workouts lasting longer than 45 minutes. The
effects of this training is that the body uses less carbs
and more fat at a given intensity.

--
Perre

You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
 
P

Per ElmsäTer

Guest
EvilDog wrote:
> Let me make a few suggestions here.
>
> 1) You will need to do your riding to burn fat and not
> carbs. This is done by riding at a completely
> comfortable aerobic pace and not anaerobically. This
> means that you will have to pedal more easily and at a
> lower heart rate. Try staying at about 65% of your max
> for the duration of your ride. No showing off, no
> heroics. Avoid sprinting and fast paces. Just keep it
> easy. The harder you ride, the more your muscles will
> depend on burning carbs and not fat. This is why you
> are having a strong sugar craving after your ride. Also
> you will want to up your daily intake of protein if you
> haven't already done so.
>

This suggestion is absolutely bogus and one of the myths
going around. Probably started by the fitness industry in
order to market their products. The harder and longer you
ride the more fat you will burn. Period It is true that at a
higher intensity you will burn more carbs than fat.
_*Percentagewise*_. However totally you will still be
burning more fat at a high intensity than at a low
intensity. Also if you get your fatburning engine going you
will continue to burn lots of fat after your workout as your
body is recovering.

--
Perre

You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.