32 vs. 36

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Squid-In-Traini, May 16, 2003.

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  1. Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to 36 with a new Rhyno Lite because
    my rear is always out of whack.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
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  2. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to
    36 with
    > a new Rhyno Lite because my rear is always out of whack.

    Bear in mind that if you go with 36 and end up bending it in the middle of nowhere, you might not
    find a replacement because no-one rides that heavy junk any more, 32 is where it's at.

    James
     
  3. > Bear in mind that if you go with 36 and end up bending it in the middle of nowhere, you might not
    > find a replacement because no-one rides that heavy junk any more, 32 is where it's at.

    I hardly think that 36 is out... nearly every MTB rim manufacturer produces 28s, 32s, and 36s.

    Walgooses all have 36s b/c they're POSs.

    But yes, I would prefer to stay 32.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  4. James Annan <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > > Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to
    > 36 with
    > > a new Rhyno Lite because my rear is always out of whack.
    >
    > Bear in mind that if you go with 36 and end up bending it in the middle of nowhere, you might not
    > find a replacement because no-one rides that heavy junk any more, 32 is where it's at.
    >
    > James

    If I was going to "the middle of nowhere" I would opt for a more durable wheel with 36 spokes or
    more (my tandem has 48 spoke wheels).

    In "the middle of nowhere" there are no ready replacements, so, when you go there, get a wheel that
    is the least likely to break.

    32 hole rims may have some advantage in terms of ultimate low weight, but for most users this is
    more than offset by higher maintenance. In any case the weight difference is miniscule.

    Quality rims and hubs ARE readily available in 36 hole drilling, to suggest otherwise is
    simply not true.

    Unless you have a compelling reason to choose a low spoke count wheel, my advice would be to get a
    36 spoke wheel.

    I would not buy anything because it is "where it's at" without finding out what benefit is
    conferred.
     
  5. W K

    W K Guest

    "James Annan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > > Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to
    > 36 with
    > > a new Rhyno Lite because my rear is always out of whack.
    >
    > Bear in mind that if you go with 36 and end up bending it in the middle of nowhere, you might not
    > find a replacement because no-one rides that heavy junk any more, 32 is where it's at.

    Is this some sort of MTB Fabrizio Mazzoleni? Surely we aren't talking road bikes if its
    Rhyno Lites ?

    Also - whilst touring "in the middle of no-where", you're more likely to find a low price backwater
    cycle shop, probably more likely to have 36 hole rims than anything else.
     
  6. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    W K wrote:
    > "James Annan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    >> > Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to
    >>36 with
    >> > a new Rhyno Lite because my rear is always out of whack.
    >>
    >>Bear in mind that if you go with 36 and end up bending it in the middle of nowhere, you might not
    >>find a replacement because no-one rides that heavy junk any more, 32 is where it's at.
    >
    >
    > Is this some sort of MTB Fabrizio Mazzoleni? Surely we aren't talking road bikes if its
    > Rhyno Lites ?
    >
    > Also - whilst touring "in the middle of no-where", you're more likely to find a low price
    > backwater cycle shop, probably more likely to have 36 hole rims than anything else.

    Oh dear, I forgot the smiley...

    I was referring to our experience on a multi-day stage race in the Canadian Rockies last year
    (http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/transrockies/index.html), where the 'full mechanical
    support' did not have a single 36H rim of any description to act as a spare when we bent our wheel.
    Due to a combination of fortunate circumstances, we managed to cope for the two days it took them to
    find a replacement, at which time they realised they didn't have any spokes of the right length (the
    rim being a different model to our bent one)...

    James
     
  7. "Phil, Squid-in-Training" wrote:
    >
    > Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to 36 with a new Rhyno Lite
    > because my rear is always out of whack.
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training

    I would. The 4 extra spokes aren't going to turn the bike into lead.
    <G> Since you're running Rhyno Lytes, you're probably not a gram counter. FWIW, I've found the
    Rhyno Lite to be an extremely durable wheel.

    Barry
     
  8. Phil-<< Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to 36 with a new Rhyno Lite
    because my rear is always out of whack.

    There is really no downside to 36 spokes, 4 spokes weigh about 28 grams but 36 is a stronger wheel
    than 32...no reason not to use 36h...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  9. Jon Rogers

    Jon Rogers Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
    > Phil-<< Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to 36 with a new Rhyno
    > Lite because my rear is always out of whack.
    >
    > There is really no downside to 36 spokes, 4 spokes weigh about 28 grams but 36 is a stronger wheel
    > than 32...no reason not to use 36h...
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm

    And how much do 4 extra holes weigh?

    ;-)

    --
    Jon
    ____________________________________________
    jondotrogersatntlworlddotcom
    ============================================
     
  10. W K

    W K Guest

    "James Annan" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > W K wrote:

    > > Is this some sort of MTB Fabrizio Mazzoleni? Surely we aren't talking road bikes if its Rhyno
    > > Lites ?

    > Oh dear, I forgot the smiley...

    Ah, I see. But he too does it "with a straight face".
     
  11. Derk

    Derk Guest

    Robin Hubert wrote:

    >> Bear in mind that if you go with 36 and end up bending it in the middle of nowhere, you might not
    >> find a replacement because no-one rides that heavy junk any more, 32 is where it's at.
    What a load of nonsense! Here many riders still ride 36 spoke wheels. I noticed that in S. France,
    where roads are not as good as here, 36 spokes are a better choice than 32. HOw much weight are we
    talking about? 4 spokes= how many grams? Maybe it's a better idea to leave some other stuff at home
    or to lose a few pounds.

    Derk
     
  12. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Phil-<< Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering
    if I should go to 36
    > with a new Rhyno Lite because my rear is always out of whack.
    >
    > There is really no downside to 36 spokes, 4 spokes weigh
    about 28 grams but 36
    > is a stronger wheel than 32...no reason not to use 36h...

    Furthermore, if you do break a spoke, a 36 spoke wheel stays almost true. A 32 spoke wheel with a
    broken spoke is wobblier.

    That staid, a Rhyno Lite is a pretty stout rim, so it probably wouldn't make any difference.

    I lean toward 36 spoke wheels myself, though they're becoming pretty hard to find. As far as being
    stranded with a taco'ed wheel and not being able to find a replacement rim, that's a longshot
    anyway. You'd have to get matching spokes too, and a shop that can actually build a wheel from
    scratch, which is becoming rare as well. If you think skilled help is hard to find in big city bike
    shops, wait 'til you get off the beaten path! Usually the solution to this problem is to buy a
    ready-made wheel -- sometimes off another bike, because no others are available. Even when you do
    have time to chase down the "right" parts, it's not only easier but cheaper to use a take-off or
    surplus wheel.

    Matt O.
     
  13. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    > And how much do 4 extra holes weigh? ;-)

    Less than 4 eyelets :)

    ~PB
     
  14. "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<V%[email protected]>...
    > Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to 36 with a new Rhyno Lite
    > because my rear is always out of whack.

    Because of the myth that 32 is cooler, there are deals to be had on
    36. That's hubs and rims. Get 'em cheap and let the "cool" girls ride on 32s and fewer spokes.
     
  15. "Michael Pearlman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:<V%[email protected]>...
    > > Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to 36
    with
    > > a new Rhyno Lite because my rear is always out of whack.
    >
    >
    > Because of the myth that 32 is cooler, there are deals to be had on
    > 36. That's hubs and rims. Get 'em cheap and let the "cool" girls ride on 32s and fewer spokes.

    Everywhere I go, they're all the same price. Can you name a source?

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  16. "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Michael Pearlman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:<V%[email protected]>...
    > > > Is there a big strength difference? I'm wondering if I should go to 36
    > with
    > > > a new Rhyno Lite because my rear is always out of whack.
    > >
    > >
    > > Because of the myth that 32 is cooler, there are deals to be had on
    > > 36. That's hubs and rims. Get 'em cheap and let the "cool" girls ride on 32s and fewer spokes.
    >
    > Everywhere I go, they're all the same price. Can you name a source?

    Yes. Performance Bikes has a 36 hole wheel set for about $100. I ordered the front for $61 including
    postage. Of course that was 19 days ago and it has yet to arrive. This morning I got a claim form
    from them in email that I've been directed to fil out and send back to them for a refund.
     
  17. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    wheels with 36 spokes are UGLY!
     
  18. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On 20 May 2003 09:04:28 -0700, [email protected] (g.daniels) wrote:

    >wheels with 36 spokes are UGLY!

    That's OK, when they're going round, you can't tell.

    If you ride it occasionally, instead of drooling over it, it's not a problem.

    (Old silver 36 hole XTR's and a half-radial rear)
     
  19. "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Everywhere I go, they're all the same price. Can you name a source?

    Walk into your friendly local bicycle shop and ask them if they have any 36 hole rims they can make
    you a deal on.

    Last time I did this they handed me a dusty pair of 36 hole FIR EL20's and offered them for $10
    each. Seemed like a good deal to me.

    You can probably make an equally good deal on a front 36 hole hub but since rear hubs are obsolete
    every few years now chances are you would have to pay full price for a current model.

    Bruce
    --
    Bruce Jackson - Sr. Systems Programmer - DMSP, a M/A/R/C Group company
     
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