34/26 Enough for Riding Mont Ventoux?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Bianchi Dude, May 19, 2004.

  1. Wow.. nice pictures. I just watched a special on the roman
    aqueducts.. seeing them cross the road in that picture
    blew my mind..

    --
    Mike Beauchamp http://www.therevox.com - custom electro-
    theremins and stuff. http://www.mikebeauchamp.com - mike's
    personal site.

    "Mike Jacoubowsky/Chain Reaction Bicycles"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > Don't know what masters 4/5 is but I rode up Mont
    > > Ventoux and many of
    the
    > > Tour de France cols in the Pyrenees and Alps in 1994
    > > when I was aged 28
    on
    > > 39x24.
    >
    > Ouch! While it's certainly possible for a fit person to
    > ride up Mont Ventoux in such gearing, for most it wouldn't
    > be very enjoyable. Mont Ventoux is one of the most
    > monotonous climbs in existence, with a very
    long
    > stretch of unvarying grade in the 9.5% range that drives
    > you nuts.
    >
    > Lower gearing would be preferable, since it would allow
    > you to vary your climbing style on the way up.
    >
    > Ventoux is also not a climb to attempt in questionable
    > weather (either too hot or too cold). For information on a
    > rather disastrous day on Ventoux-
    > http://www.chainreaction.com/letape2000.htm. And for a
    > more favorable day on the mountain-
    > http://www.chainreaction.com/diaryfrance.htm#ventoux0721
    >
    > --Mike Jacoubowsky Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReaction.com IMBA, BikesBelong, NBDA member
     


  2. bianchi dude wrote:

    > I will be in France around the middle of July to watch the
    > TDF - with a couple of side trips to ride the grand
    > mountain passes.
    >
    > Mont Ventoux is on my list and being that I've never
    > ridden a mountain pass (lots of long "hills" in MN, but
    > nothing over a mile continuous), I'm anticipating that I
    > will need to scrap my 39/53 for a "Tyler"
    > 50/34 compact crank. So, I'm wondering if anyone in the
    > Masters 4/5 ability range has ridden Mont Ventoux on
    > this type of setup without resorting to walking half-
    > way up? Switching to a triple crank is not economically
    > possible.

    Read this, and think of Eros "famous for being tall and
    coming last in the Giro" Poli.

    http://www.velonews.com/race/tour2002/articles/2509.0.html
     
  3. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    David Damerell <[email protected]> wrote:

    : How do you know you rode "that route"? You don't know
    : where I was coming from!

    Ok, my mistake. Replace with "those hills".

    :>Which of course 34x34 is. Now try climbing 10k at 9%
    :>in 39/24.

    : Well, that's 1.6 times as tall a gear, but I expect one
    : might like to use a slightly higher cadence, so let's call
    : it 8mph. Analytic Cycling has that at 270W. This doesn't
    : seem prohibitive.

    8mph is 12.8kph. So, given the length of climbs, can you
    sustain 270W for an hour? I can, but I can't then descend
    the hill, do it again on the next col and the next.

    270W sustained is hard. Very few tourists can do that
    for example.

    As for Jobst's gearing - his gear choices are not those of
    normal mortals! Personally I like to climb long alpine type
    climbs at 90rpm+, which clearly affects my choice of gear.
    Jobst climbs at 40rpm. Hence his.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Technolibertarians make a
    philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  4. Arthur Clune <[email protected]> wrote:
    >David Damerell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Well, that's 1.6 times as tall a gear, but I expect one
    >>might like to use a slightly higher cadence, so let's call
    >>it 8mph. Analytic Cycling has that at 270W. This doesn't
    >>seem prohibitive.
    >8mph is 12.8kph. So, given the length of climbs, can you
    >sustain 270W for an hour?

    Sure... just about.

    Look, I'm not saying the OP _should_ take a 39/24 to the
    Alps - if I were him I would take my existing 34/34, and I'm
    glad to see he's fitted a 110bcd 50/34 up front - but I
    think it's not impossible for a fit tourist to use a 39/24
    if that's what is available.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
  5. Jay Beattie

    Jay Beattie Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Terry Morse writes:
    >
    > >> Ouch! While it's certainly possible for a fit person to
    ride up
    > >> Mont Ventoux in such gearing, for most it wouldn't be
    > >> very enjoyable. Mont Ventoux is one of the most
    > >> monotonous
    climbs in
    > >> existence, with a very long stretch of unvarying
    > >> grade in
    the 9.5%
    > >> range that drives you nuts.
    >
    > > Agreed. Just being able to choose a different cadence
    > > once in
    a
    > > while on a long climb is nice. I used a 42/26 most
    > > of the
    time on
    > > Ventoux, but shifted down at times to a 30/19. Legs
    > > get bored
    of the
    > > same climbing cadence.
    >
    > > Hey Mike, want to do Everest Challenge this year? I've
    > > signed
    up.
    > > It's at the end of September, so it hopefully
    > > won't be so
    hot. I did
    > > a few of the climbs last weekend, they are long but
    > > not hard.
    The
    > > climb up to Schulman Grove (19.7 mi, 5.5%)
    > > reminded me of
    Ventoux.
    > > All it needed was a big tower at the top.
    >
    > > http://everestchallenge.com/
    >
    > We don't need no steenking Ventoux, in California we got
    > our
    own
    > Sonora Pass in the Sierra 9624ft with long sections of
    > +20%
    grades,
    > as in:
    >
    > http://www.chainreaction.com/sonora_pass.htm

    This link illustrates the difficulty of photographing a
    relatively straight, steep grade with a 50mm-or-less lense .
    They always look flat-ish. All you get with this kind of
    shot is a brief rest and some nice scenery. For real drama,
    you need switch backs, or a reference point to illustrate
    the grade, like the buildings on Filmore. -- Jay Beattie.

    P.S. -- The steepest hill in the world is on my way home
    from work, behind PSU. It is about 500%. Really.
     
  6. > Hey Mike, want to do Everest Challenge this year? I've
    > signed up. It's at the end of September, so it hopefully
    > won't be so hot. I did a few of the climbs last weekend,
    > they are long but not hard. The climb up to Schulman Grove
    > (19.7 mi, 5.5%) reminded me of Ventoux. All it needed was
    > a big tower at the top.
    >
    > http://everestchallenge.com/

    Not in this lifetime. It wouldn't be so bad if it weren't
    also a sanctioned event; the last thing in the world I need
    to do is get foolish and think I could pretend to be who I
    used to was. Or, as they say, you can't get there from here!

    You sure do get around... any kids at home? I have to
    negotiate time away, since I only have one day off/week.

    By the way, a week from this Sunday is looking like a good
    possibility for doing Ebbetts & Pacific Grade. Kinda mild
    for your style though!

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  7. crystal_tears_

    crystal_tears_ New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2003
    Messages:
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    Yeah i would say 34/26 gearing should be low enough for Mont Ventoux if you're quite fit. But to be on the safe side it might be worth opting for a 28 or even a 29 on the back. Better to be safe than sorry and all that.

    After putting it off for so long i plan to climb Ventoux later this year. I'm taking my lightest bike with 39/28 gearing.
     
  8. I spent 4 weeks in austria and italy last year cycling 100+km 2000m+ every
    day and my experience is that it is always a good thing to have an extra
    gear available to shift down. Not that I needed it for all climbs but it
    actually gave me a good feeling to know that I am not on the lowest gear.
    Climbing north-side of grossclockner and east side of fedaia I found the
    bottom gear quite usefull :).

    My setup was a trek 5500, 50/39 front and 12-34 back. long
    cage xt deraillur. Worked very well. Usually I was on 39-27
    or 39-30 on the climbs.

    Torsten Amundsen

    "crystal_tears_" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > Yeah i would say 34/26 gearing should be low enough for
    > Mont Ventoux if you're quite fit. But to be on the safe
    > side it might be worth opting for a 28 or even a 29 on the
    > back. Better to be safe than sorry and all that.
    >
    > After putting it off for so long i plan to climb Ventoux
    > later this year. I'm taking my lightest bike with 39/28
    > gearing.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
     
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