35 / 63 mile bike tour question

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by endurancemom, Apr 22, 2010.

  1. endurancemom

    endurancemom New Member

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    I have been riding pretty regularly. My long weekend rides are usually between 20-35 miles, 35 being the longest I have attempted in quite awhile. I can do 35 without too much trouble, though I am a bit tired towards the end. Do you think I should attempt the 63 mile tour on Sunday, or stick with the 35 mile? The tour area consists of a 35 mile flat to rolling loop, and an optional 28 mile rolling to hilly loop. The longest I have ever ridden was last fall for about 64 miles.
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Is there a difference in the sign-up fee?

    If not, plan on the longer ride, but back off a little on the pace for the first 35 miles ...

    I would think that after the first 35 mile section you'll know how you feel ... I reckon the hillier section is probably going to feel twice as difficult as the flatter section, so if you're not feeling really spry at the end of the first 35 miles, then you should bail UNLESS there is a SAG wagon which will sweep you up & take you back to your car if you bonk or if you decide to bail during the latter "half" of the ride.
     
  3. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

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    If you can ride 35 miles comfortably, then you should have no problem with the longer tour. Just ride at a comfortable pace and make the most of your rest stops.

    The miles are much less noticeable if you are riding with a group or find some folks along the way to chat with.
     
  4. genedan

    genedan New Member

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    You should be able to complete the tour, but I wouldn't be surprised if you get uncomfortable in the second half. Just make sure you take rest stops whenever you can. Since you've done 64 miles before you pretty much know what it feels like. If you're riding more now in your regular training rides than you did in the ones last fall, you should feel a little better with this tour.

    As a general rule of thumb, you shouldn't increase your mileage on your long ride by more than 10% a week. The next time you plan on going on a long tour it's a good idea to make sure you can do 90% of the distance before hand.
     
  5. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    If your doing 35 then doing 64 is a bit of a stretch and you will be tired and sore so you take the next day off followed by a short easy ride the next.

    If in the future this is something you want to start doing then you need to start riding a progressively few more miles on each ride during the week and progressively more miles on the weekend so your not caught out of shape and taking more time to recover.

    If you have any ambitions to do a century here's a schedule that can help you, it can even help you with less

    Training
     
  6. endurancemom

    endurancemom New Member

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    I ended up completing the entire tour. I felt really good after the first 35 miles (of flat/rolling terrain). There was one rest stop and then at the end a lunch stop. After a quick lunch, I assessed my condition and felt well enough to go for the extra 28 mile rolling to hilly loop. I surprised myself and did really well actually. I did have to go down to the lightest gear on my bike on some of those big hills, but I never stopped. Today my legs feel tired but there is no soreness. The only soreness I felt was on my left wrist - not sure if I'm gripping to heavily at times or what. My right wrist is just fine. I notice this will happen on my longer rides over 30+ miles.

    I did take today off from riding, but as you mentioned and I've thought, I'm going to increase my overall mileage, both on weekday rides and the long ride on the weekend. I'm going to try and incorporate a few more hills as well for practice and conditioning. I've been doing weight training once a week so I'll continue that as well, but with more focus on the cycling.
     
  7. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Not sure what you are trying to accomplish, but if you leaning more towards being a better cyclist then a body builder then go for toning the body not adding mass, because mass will only make you a slower rider.
     
  8. Enriss

    Enriss New Member

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    The modern conception of a "toning" workout is essentially a myth. If toning is taken to mean something along the lines of "firmness" one would think that the best toned athletes would be the ones with the least fat and the most intense muscle contractions. Few athletes will beat superheavyweight powerlifters for maximal muscle contraction, marathoners/endurance-cyclists for low body fat, or gymnasts for a combination. These athletes didn't get where they are by curling 5 lb dumbbells to failure.
    If you're interested in maintaining some base level of strength, arrange your workout around a small number of compound movements(deadlifts, squats, rows, presses, etc.) and throw whatever else you like in for fun if there's something you particularly enjoy.
     
  9. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Wasn't sure how to word the "toning" part correctly but you did. I was referring to a professional body builder type of person is not very effective riding a bike fast or running fast as a leaner person.

    There are plenty of web sites that can tell a person involved with cycling how to strength train, here's one such site: Ultracycling: Strength Training for a Century
     
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