4 vs 2 bolt stems

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by DeF, May 1, 2006.

  1. DeF

    DeF Guest

    In my limited experience of these new-fangled
    threadless forks, I've observed that two-bolt
    stems creak more than four-bolt stems. Does
    this concur with others experience? I ask as
    the bike I ride the most has a handlebar creak
    and a two-bolt stem. I detest creaking and
    would gladly lay down some cash and labour to
    replace it with a 4 bolt version. The other
    variables in this is the standard vs oversize
    handlebars (thinner version on the 2-bolter)
    and 1" vs 1 1/8" steerers.

    DeF.

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  2. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    DeF wrote:
    > In my limited experience of these new-fangled
    > threadless forks, I've observed that two-bolt
    > stems creak more than four-bolt stems. Does
    > this concur with others experience? I ask as
    > the bike I ride the most has a handlebar creak
    > and a two-bolt stem. I detest creaking and
    > would gladly lay down some cash and labour to
    > replace it with a 4 bolt version. The other
    > variables in this is the standard vs oversize
    > handlebars (thinner version on the 2-bolter)
    > and 1" vs 1 1/8" steerers.


    Easton have the following to say about 2 bolt vs 4 bolt :

    http://www.eastonbike.com/downloadable_files/r&d_files/R&D-06-2Bolts.pdf

    I have 2 bolt stems on all my bikes, they don't creak. What's wrong on
    yours?
     
  3. On 1 May 2006 02:00:25 -0700, Bleve wrote:

    > Easton have the following to say about 2 bolt vs 4 bolt :
    >
    > http://www.eastonbike.com/downloadable_files/r&d_files/R&D-06-2Bolts.pdf


    Thanks, good article (although I had trouble finding page 2 initially!) I
    feel inspired to buy a torque wrench :)

    > I have 2 bolt stems on all my bikes, they don't creak.


    Same here. Whenever a noise develops there, I just clean the mating
    surfaces and grease the bolts thoroughly.

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  4. rooman

    rooman New Member

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    me hiver!

    use some teflon grease (red stuff) on your bolts, and don't leave the bolts for too long without an adjustment...dry bolt thread squeak avoided

    you'll get some where the stem may rub the bars, but shouldnt really if they are both the right diam. and proper torque in the bolts (5Nm is enough usually)
     
  5. DeF

    DeF Guest

    rooman wrote:
    > Bleve Wrote:
    >> DeF wrote:
    >>> In my limited experience of these new-fangled
    >>> threadless forks, I've observed that two-bolt
    >>> stems creak more than four-bolt stems. Does
    >>> this concur with others experience? I ask as
    >>> the bike I ride the most has a handlebar creak
    >>> and a two-bolt stem. I detest creaking and
    >>> would gladly lay down some cash and labour to
    >>> replace it with a 4 bolt version. The other
    >>> variables in this is the standard vs oversize
    >>> handlebars (thinner version on the 2-bolter)
    >>> and 1" vs 1 1/8" steerers.

    >> Easton have the following to say about 2 bolt vs 4 bolt :
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/nhx7r
    >>
    >> I have 2 bolt stems on all my bikes, they don't creak. What's wrong on
    >> yours?

    > me hiver!
    >
    > use some teflon grease (red stuff) on your bolts, and don't leave the
    > bolts for too long without an adjustment...dry bolt thread squeak
    > avoided
    >
    > you'll get some where the stem may rub the bars, but shouldnt really if
    > they are both the right diam. and proper torque in the bolts (5Nm is
    > enough usually)
    >
    >


    Hmm, OK. I'll check the torque on the stem and make sure
    the bolts are greased. Might clean the stem and bars too
    to make sure there's no grit and see what happens.
    50 inch pounds equals 5.6 Nm - I'll see how that goes.

    DeF

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  6. rooman

    rooman New Member

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    check the torque for your stem , it should be printed on the stem somewhere, if not then maybe check manufacturer's web site or your LBS, they are all different, my suggestion of 5Nm is as printed on my stems for two bolt face plates on my Deda, BBB, & ITM alloy stems using stainless bolts...
     
  7. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    rooman wrote:

    > check the torque for your stem , it should be printed on the stem
    > somewhere, if not then maybe check manufacturer's web site or your LBS,
    > they are all different, my suggestion of 5Nm is as printed on my stems
    > for two bolt face plates on my Deda, BBB, & ITM alloy stems using
    > stainless bolts...


    The thing to remember is that it's not so much the stem that matters,
    but the bars. It's not the stem that gets crushed by overtightening.
    That's why it's odd that bars don't have some recommended clamping
    force and that manufacturers aren't more cautious about bar & stem
    combinations.
     
  8. mitosis

    mitosis New Member

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    The key is to make the bolt torque even.

    Surely a four bolt stem spreads the load over the clamped area of the handlebars better than a two bolt stem (assuming the bolts are tightened to the same torque). This is acknowledged in the Easton article after an inconsequential point about bolt thickness.
     
  9. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    mitosis wrote:
    > rooman Wrote:
    > > check the torque for your stem , it should be printed on the stem
    > > somewhere, if not then maybe check manufacturer's web site or your LBS,
    > > they are all different, my suggestion of 5Nm is as printed on my stems
    > > for two bolt face plates on my Deda, BBB, & ITM alloy stems using
    > > stainless bolts...

    >
    > The key is to make the bolt torque even.
    >
    > Surely a four bolt stem spreads the load over the clamped area of the
    > handlebars better than a two bolt stem (assuming the bolts are
    > tightened to the same torque). This is acknowledged in the Easton
    > article after an inconsequential point about bolt thickness.


    It shares the compressive load, but sharpens the bending points by
    removing the ability of the bars to pivot around the line joining two
    bolts. At least, that's my understanding. Been a long time since I
    did any real engineering and that was only statics :)
     
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