<$400 wheels for a big cyclist?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Hoosierfan, Oct 28, 2005.

  1. Hoosierfan

    Hoosierfan New Member

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    Looking for some guidance on purchasing a new wheelset (well...starting with rear wheel, then front wheel down the road in order to lessen the $$$ hit...and shock from my wife).

    My current weight is 240 lbs (on the way down to sub 200). No racing at this time, but may try a TT down the road. Usual rides are 20-50 miles over mostly flat terrain (central Indiana).

    I've had a lot of people try to steer me towards the Mavic CXP-33 rims (32 spoke count) with hub of my choice and 14/15 double butted spokes. I've also had Velocity Arrowhead rims suggested. A co-worker has even offered me a used set of Mavic Ksyrium SSC wheels (original model) for around $300.

    Where to go? I'm leaning toward custom built wheels, but still so many options. I do understand at my weight (plus at 6'2"), I should stay away from ultra light wheels with low spoke counts.

    Thanks for any suggestions.
     
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  2. artmichalek

    artmichalek New Member

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    That's probably a good place to start. With Ultegra hubs, you're looking at $250-$300. I would recomend going to your LBS and seeing if they know of any good local builders. A good builder can help you narrow down the choices on rims and spoke counts.
     
  3. Ozark Bicycle

    Ozark Bicycle New Member

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    IMO, a custom wheelset is the way to go. A 36H Velocity Aerohead OC is a good choice for the rear. In the front, you can go with a 36H, 32H, or even 28H
    Aerohead. Shimano 105 or Ultegra hubs and either DT or Wheelsmith "butted" spokes would be good choices. The key is finding a wheelbuilder who is skilled in the art and builds with both adequate and even spoke tension.

    Also, IMHO, you should avoid the Ksyrium SSCs.
     
  4. artemidorus

    artemidorus New Member

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    you should know that you are much heavier than the maximum weight that Velocity recommend for the Aerohead rim, which is 85kg.
     
  5. Ozark Bicycle

    Ozark Bicycle New Member

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    IME, that weight limit is _very_ conservative. A properly built, properly tensioned 36H Aerohead OC rear wheel can be surprisingly strong. The front, which bears ~half the load of the rear, is no problem, even with 32 spokes. The key issues are the right spokes (e.g., 14/15ga "butted", not 14ga), sufficient spoke tension that is even from spoke to spoke and proper stress relieving prior to use.
     
  6. Az cactus

    Az cactus New Member

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    I'm thinking ...what's your weighth goal? I was 230lb. when I started training back in August, and had the same decision to make, I'm 180lb. now and still on the way down, so I bought a cheap wheelset "for training" in order to buy a better set later on for next year racing season.
    The one I have is the "Ultegra/Mavic Open Pro Wheelset, 32 spokes. Doing rides from 30-50 miles in flat and a couple of hills terrain, have no complains or problems at all, they work great. I totally recommend them. Supergo has them on sale for $189.95.
    Good luck, and have fun.

    AC
     
  7. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    My favorite wheels for a cyclist of your weight is Velocity DeepV with 36 spokes. At $400 you can get DURA ACE, but for $300 or less you can get Ultegra. I like Sapim Race 14/15 DB spokes as much or mor than DT. I have built Deep V wheels for many large riders with very good results.
    The advantages of the stiffness of the Deep V is that they help distribute the load over a larger segment of the wheel and therefore over more spokes.
    Most Mavic Road Wheels and rims (including CXP-33) are rated for 100 kg rider weight maximum. MA-3 is rated at 85 kg. When you get wheels that you can trust and just ride you can focus on riding an loosing more weight. Many of the Deep V wheels I have built started under riders at over 240 pounds... some are now under 200 pounds.
    dave at ornee dot net
     
  8. bikerjohn

    bikerjohn New Member

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    Hi big guy! I was also and still am a big guy. Three years ago, I was 230 lbs. I am now 195 and have been steady at that. I recently purchased for my road bike the Easton Orion II wheelset off eBay for around your budget. What a great set of wheels!!! Previously I owned the Bontrager Race (nice wheel also but slightly rigid and had a heavy feel) and I also own the new Shimano WH-R560 wheelset(slightly plusher than the Race but feels springy) but they are slightly "softer" and flexes when I stand up and hammer. The Orion II's are great. They are very stiff when I get up out of the saddle (stiffer than the two above but still able to give a plush ride) and are a relatively light set of wheels(1500 grams for the pair). Hey, we big guys need all the help we can get when it comes to going up; but look out on the way down! I've been super happy with the Eastons and after 300 miles, they are still true as when I got them. All the spokes are tensioned evenly and within a very tight tolerence. The same wheelset is available under the Velomax lable. Good luck in your search-I'm confident that you won't be dissapointed with the Orion II. John.
     
  9. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    I weigh 250 and live in Indianapolis. I've been riding either Mavic Open Pro/Ultegra hubs or Alex ALX-295 (stock wheel on many mid-grade Specialized bikes) or 26" ZAK 19 rims/Joytech hubs depending on which bike I'm riding.

    The ALX-295 wheels have seen the most miles by far. They have 20 spokes in front and 24 in back. I broke 1 spoken on the rear wheel between 1400 to 1500 miles, replaced it, trued wheel and haven't had any problems with them since. They have about 3000 miles on them now. Of course, by having typed this up, on my next ride I'll break 3 of 4 spokes for sure. :eek:
     
  10. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I'm about 230 or so and have been riding all year on a set of Campy Proton's. I paid $389 for the set last year from excelsports and they are outstanding. I have hit some nasty stuff with them and they are still perfectly true. I also raced with them and they are very stiff and fairly light (1650 grams or so).
     
  11. geoffs

    geoffs New Member

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    I second what daveornee has written.
    We use DeepV's on our tandems both 700c and 26" and they have been 100% reliable. Our 26" wheeled bike has done a few thousand km's of loaded touring with a rolling weight of 195kgs.

    Cheers

    Geoff
     
  12. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    "There is no clear dividing line defining when someone is "too heavy" for Campagnolo products. Many factors need to be considered.
    Campagnolo products were designed for "racing" type bicycles used on smooth asphalt roads or tracks. Any other use of Campagnolo products is improper.
    Magnified stresses and loads caused by a "heavy" rider, coupled with forces from an uneven road surface, greatly shorten the lifespan of Campagnolo products, especially if your bicycle is equipped with tires, wheels, or stiff frames that are poor at absorbing shocks and vibrations.
    The weight of the rider, type of bike and the style and conditions of use are all critical factors affecting the lifespan of your product.
    Technical knowledge, experience, common sense, and prudence are required. If you weigh 80 kg or more, you must be especially vigilant and have your bicycle inspected regularly for any evidence of cracks, deformation, or other signs of fatigue or stress. Check with your mechanic to discuss whether the components you selected are suitable for your use, and to determine the frequency of inspections."
    Quoted from the Campagnolo Q & A section of thier web pages.
     
  13. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    If there's truly a weight limit on the Proton's (actual, not Campy's 80 kg CYA disclaimer), I'm nowhere near it. I clean, and inspect the bike quite frequently and there is no sign of any type of wear. In fact these wheels are much sturdier than a set of OP's that I have.
     
  14. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    I'll second Dave's recommendations also. Believe the OP is correct in looking for a strong wheel that will give him years of trouble-free service. A 240 lb fitness rider doesn't need to mess with lightweight race wheels.....what would be the point? Gram-counting just isn't an important criteria for this selection.
     
  15. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I'm just putting my .02 based on the title of the thread. I paid less than $400 for my Protons and I'm a big cyclist. He also mentioned racing in some TT's, which brings race wheels into the picture. I have had OP's and although they are fine all around wheels, I prefer the Protons.
     
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