406 tyres



T

Tim Hall

Guest
I'm running an Alex DV15 rim and Schwalbe Cityjet 406-20 on the front
of my Pino.

It's a complete ******* to get the tyre on and off - I was dreading
getting a puncture when I first fitted it, but finally got one this
weekend. It was a struggle and I had to resort to using levers to put
the tyre _on_, something I've never done before. Hooray for Park Tools
blue levers.

Anyway is anyone else using this size rim? (Mr. Larrington, that means
you). What tyre are you running on it? Will a wider tyre be easier to
fit?

Tim
--
Blue Witch laughed at me
 
J

John B

Guest
Tim Hall wrote:

> I'm running an Alex DV15 rim and Schwalbe Cityjet 406-20 on the front
> of my Pino.
>
> It's a complete ******* to get the tyre on and off


> Anyway is anyone else using this size rim? (Mr. Larrington, that means
> you). What tyre are you running on it? Will a wider tyre be easier to
> fit?


I'm not Mr L, but I do use the same rim 20" 406 on the front of the
Trice. I'm presently using Primo Comets - fast and slick and they go on
and off very easily.

On the 20" 451 rims on the Bike Friday I have Stevios and they are OK
too, though I am suffering an overdose of flats with them.

Stev
 
L

LSMike

Guest
Tim Hall wrote:
> I'm running an Alex DV15 rim and Schwalbe Cityjet 406-20 on the front
> of my Pino.
>
> It's a complete ******* to get the tyre on and off - I was dreading
> getting a puncture when I first fitted it, but finally got one this
> weekend. It was a struggle and I had to resort to using levers to put
> the tyre _on_, something I've never done before. Hooray for Park Tools
> blue levers.
>
> Anyway is anyone else using this size rim? (Mr. Larrington, that means
> you). What tyre are you running on it? Will a wider tyre be easier to
> fit?
>
> Tim
> --
> Blue Witch laughed at me


I'll only make your misery worse, sorry. I run 406's on my Hurricane,
Alex DA-16 rims with folding Schwalbe Stelvios. Don't need tyre levers
at all to get them on and off, but I imagine they are much more
flexible and narrower than yours.

I've heard some folks recommend a Crank Bros speed lever as a lifesaver
with tyres like yours. I've never tried them myself, mind.
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ProductDeta...cle&CategoryName=&ProdID=5360019204&UberCat=0
 
I

Ian Smith

Guest
On Mon, 30 Jan 2006, Tim Hall <[email protected]> wrote:

> I'm running an Alex DV15 rim and Schwalbe Cityjet 406-20 on the front
> of my Pino.
>
> Anyway is anyone else using this size rim? (Mr. Larrington, that means
> you). What tyre are you running on it? Will a wider tyre be easier to
> fit?


Yes, DV15 on the trice. Schwalbe marathon slicks on teh front are a
pig to get off (I've bent a few levers) but I can _just_ get them on
by hand. I've never taken the marathon off teh back (which says
something, given that it's had 3.5 years of daily commuting including
off-road track).

regards, Ian SMith
--
|\ /| no .sig
|o o|
|/ \|
 
C

Call me Bob

Guest
On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 22:50:50 +0000, Tim Hall
<[email protected].co.uk> wrote:

>I'm running an Alex DV15 rim and Schwalbe Cityjet 406-20 on the front
>of my Pino.


>Anyway is anyone else using this size rim? (Mr. Larrington, that means
>you). What tyre are you running on it? Will a wider tyre be easier to
>fit?


I have 406 sized Alex rims on my Taifun, don't know if they are DV15's
because, **** that I am, I took the stickers off. My only experience
of tyres for these rims so far have been Continental Contact Sport
(1.3) and they are as big a ******* to get on and off as your
CityJets.

Sorry I can't offer a suggestion, just that Contact Sports won't
improve things much.


"Bob"
--

Email address is spam trapped, to reply directly remove the beverage.
 
S

sothach

Guest
LSMike wrote:

> I've heard some folks recommend a Crank Bros speed lever as a lifesaver
> with tyres like yours. I've never tried them myself, mind.
>http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ProductDeta...cle&CategoryName=&ProdID=5360019204&UberCat=0


These were just great until they broke... They were fine on narrowish
700Cs but I broke em on 26"x1.90" rims, which are the very devil to
remove/refit. I was thinking of trying one of them VAR yokes next -
anyone anything good to say about them?
 
O

Orienteer

Guest
I use this size on my Moulton. Firstly, any inaccuracy in the rim size
(circumference) will have an effect on the ease of fitting, all the greater
on a smaller wheel. Secondly, I find it essential, when fitting the last few
inches of the bead, to ensure that the bead on the diametrically opposite
side if the wheel is pushed down into the well of the rim, to provide
greater slack.
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
([email protected]) wrote:

> Anyway is anyone else using this size rim? (Mr. Larrington, that means
> you). What tyre are you running on it? Will a wider tyre be easier to
> fit?


Alex DV15 & Schwalbe Marathon Slicks 1.35" on the Trice. They are
absolutes sods to get on and off. The original Stelvios were easier,
but not really up to trike use, so I wouldn't rate 'em for a tandem
either.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
Historians' Right To Work Campaign - We Demand A Continuing Supply Of
History!
 
M

Mike Causer

Guest
On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 14:38:22 +0000, Dave Larrington wrote:

> Alex DV15 & Schwalbe Marathon Slicks 1.35" on the Trice. They are
> absolutes sods to get on and off.


I've got a one and three eighths of a king's thumb Marathon Slick on the
Alexa 425X (406x25mm) on the front of the Ross. I put it on with no
trouble -- and haven't had to take it off since. Which is nice.

The Crank Bros tyre lever (also sold as "Raleigh" at one time) is so good
I've even bought them to give to friends.



Mike
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message
<[email protected]>, Mike
Causer ('[email protected]') wrote:

> The Crank Bros tyre lever (also sold as "Raleigh" at one time) is so
> good I've even bought them to give to friends.


I bought one, tried it, wasn't greatly impressed. It works, ish. My
partner, who has trouble with conventional levers, also tried it, and
decided it didn't merit space in her bike bag. It seems to me no easier
than conventional levers, and the telescoping mechanism seems rather
flimsy. If it broke, you'd be stuck. Whereas is you break one of three
conventional levers you can normally finish the job with the other two.

Where do you see the advantage?

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
;; Our modern industrial economy takes a mountain covered with trees,
;; lakes, running streams and transforms it into a mountain of junk,
;; garbage, slime pits, and debris. -- Edward Abbey
 
D

dkahn400

Guest
Simon Brooke wrote:

> Where do you see the advantage?


It definitely does a good job of getting really tight tyres on and off
rims. The bit that goes under the tyre bead is thinner than with a
conventional lever, and the pushing action avoids the need to get a
second or third lever in. They also don't go boing and disappear into
the scenery if the tyre fights back.

They're not the perfect solution though. It's easy to skin your
knuckles on the spokes if you're not careful. It's also too easy to
pinch a tube when using it to put a tyre back on. And finally it
eventually wears out so that the hook breaks off and leaves you
stranded if it's your only lever.

--
Dave...
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Simon
Brooke ([email protected]) wrote:

> I bought one, tried it, wasn't greatly impressed. It works, ish. My
> partner, who has trouble with conventional levers, also tried it, and
> decided it didn't merit space in her bike bag. It seems to me no easier
> than conventional levers, and the telescoping mechanism seems rather
> flimsy. If it broke, you'd be stuck. Whereas is you break one of three
> conventional levers you can normally finish the job with the other two.


Ditto. It borke. I was obliged to go and rescue TWFKAML by motorcar.
Bah!

A Several of Someone Elses have recommended the VAR tyre fitting tool
<URL:http://www.bikeplus.co.uk/graphics/var%20Tool.th.jpg> as a solution
to getting the buggers on and at seven quid it's probably worth a punt.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
Wood is an excellent material for making trees, but is otherwise not to
be trusted.
 
S

squeaker

Guest
Running wired 35-406 Vredestein S-Licks on Jetset CH E280 (406-18) rims
on my Challenge Mistral. Pleased to say that they only need light
lever assistance to remove and can be replaced by thumb.
FWIW I've found that kevlar beaded MTB tyres are usually easier to fit
than wired (hence my pleasure wrt the wired S-Licks).
 
A

Alexander Rice

Guest
Tim Hall wrote:
> I'm running an Alex DV15 rim and Schwalbe Cityjet 406-20 on the front
> of my Pino.
>
> It's a complete ******* to get the tyre on and off ...


It becomes a lot easier if you put a bit of water with a little washing
up liquid on the last bit of the rim & tyre.

Also, try turning the tyre so that the bit you can't quite get on is
resting against your torso and then starting at the furthest edge of the
rim grab the tyre, pinch it together and pull it towards you. It pulls
the beads down into the rim and moves all the slack to were you want it.

Small tyres can be a pain but they're not _that_ bad

Alex
 
I

Ian Smith

Guest
On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 18:21:36 +0000, Alexander Rice <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> Small tyres can be a pain but they're not _that_ bad


They can be. Even doing everything you suggest and more, they can
be very very bad.

regards, Ian SMith
--
|\ /| no .sig
|o o|
|/ \|
 
J

John B

Guest
Ian Smith wrote:

> On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 18:21:36 +0000, Alexander Rice <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > Small tyres can be a pain but they're not _that_ bad

>
> They can be. Even doing everything you suggest and more, they can
> be very very bad.


Especially on the back of a Brommie in the cold rain and sleet :-(

John b
 
L

LSMike

Guest
Ian Smith wrote:
> On Sun, 05 Feb 2006 18:21:36 +0000, Alexander Rice <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > Small tyres can be a pain but they're not _that_ bad

>
> They can be. Even doing everything you suggest and more, they can
> be very very bad.
>


Bad they may be, but very unlikely to be anywhere near as tough as some
of the motorcycle tyres I've had to do. Most bicycle tyres seem rather
minor in comparison, IME.
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Alexander Rice ([email protected]) wrote:

> It becomes a lot easier if you put a bit of water with a little washing
> up liquid on the last bit of the rim & tyre.


Though this is rarely available on top of Butser Hill in the middle of a
downpour...

> Small tyres can be a pain but they're not _that_ bad


These ones are. Trust me, I'm a Dokta^w Darksider of more than twenty
years standing^w lying down, and I've yet to come across anything
remotely as bad.

--
Dave "Thumbs" Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
 
M

Mike Causer

Guest
On Mon, 06 Feb 2006 13:14:27 +0000, Dave Larrington wrote:

> These ones are. Trust me, I'm a Dokta^w Darksider of more than twenty
> years standing^w lying down, and I've yet to come across anything remotely
> as bad.


Pah! Yoof of today, mumble... I've been using 17" bicycle tyres since
1983 and not had any problem getting them on or off. 18" motorbike tyres
were total and utter bastards on the single attempt I've made to change
them at home.


Mike
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <pan.2006.02.06.23.58.34.720040
@firstnamelastname.com.invalid>, Mike Causer
([email protected]) wrote:
> On Mon, 06 Feb 2006 13:14:27 +0000, Dave Larrington wrote:
>
> > These ones are. Trust me, I'm a Dokta^w Darksider of more than twenty
> > years standing^w lying down, and I've yet to come across anything remotely
> > as bad.

>
> Pah! Yoof of today, mumble... I've been using 17" bicycle tyres since
> 1983 and not had any problem getting them on or off. 18" motorbike tyres
> were total and utter bastards on the single attempt I've made to change
> them at home.


17's are something of a movable feast; I am given to understand that the
quality control on both rims and tyres were a bit hit and miss in the
Wolber days. Mike Burrows reported having one rim that was /so/
oversized he was obliged to cut a section out of it and weld it back
together! I never had one that bad, but the occasional tyre could be a
bit of a swine to get on. The Bridgestones were usually harder work
than the Wolber / Moulton jobs too.

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
Also using 17" tyres from 1983 to 2001