5 Boroughs Ride

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by The Shinefelds, May 4, 2003.

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  1. The 26th? annual NYC 5 Boroughs ride was held this afternoon and there were dozens of bents. I saw
    everything from a home built lowracer with tail fairing from a MARS rider to a Barcroft Columbia,
    Vanguards, HP's, RANS lwb and swb, Easy Racers, delta and tadpole trikes, etc. It was great fun to
    see so many recumbents and even more interesting to see how riders add their individual touches to
    each bike. My riding buddy and I were on our VRexi.

    Recumbents and tandems got free front line passes. It was nice to be towards the front of the ride,
    as we were riding with 29,000+ of our other best friends on all kinds of DF's. On the down side
    there was at least one significant crash involving 4 DF bikes and an endo at 20+ mph. I think the
    weather was perfect for the ride, dry and overcast, temps in the 50's and 60's. The sun did appear
    as we were returning to Battery Park on the Staten Island Ferry.

    Was anyone else out there today? What were your impressions of the ride? Jon Shinefeld
     
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  2. I was on the Penninger Delta. It was a nice ride, a bit cold until noon, but the lack of traffic
    at the Verazzano was a nice surprise. Last year there was a human traffic jam that lasted for
    two hours.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, The Shinefelds <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Was anyone else out there today? What were your impressions of the ride? Jon Shinefeld

    Jon, I was the guy on the Pharobike.

    That endo coming off of the Queensboro bridge happened literally right in front of me... I was about
    40-50 feet behind the woman when she went down. She wasn't going all that fast... maybe somewhere
    between 15 and 20 mph. No other bikes were involved.

    I'll spare you the details of what I saw. Suffice it to say that it was bad, REALLY bad. I seriously
    believe she might be dead, or paralyzed. If anyone knows anything further please email me.

    Though this is a very well organized ride and worth doing at least once, the number of riders makes
    it one of the most dangerous rides I've ever done. Every year I have attended there's been at least
    one really bad crash.

    This was my fourth BNY in a row. There was a bit of energy lacking this year, possibly because of
    the grayish weather, possibly because of the times we live in. One disappointment was that the
    organizers moved one of the rest stops this year... it had been in a park literally under the
    Brooklyn Bridge, with FANTASTIC views.

    In past years I've dawdled at various rest stops waiting for other bent riders to catch up. Last
    year this meant that I wound up waiting literally an hour and a half to get across the
    Verrazzano Bridge.

    This year I decided to just press on instead of hanging around, and was rewarded with a much more
    pleasant ride. No lines, no waiting except at the couple of deliberate choke points that were set up
    to control traffic flow. I got to the finish at about 11:20. Last year I didn't get there until
    after 3 pm. Also, the riders up near the front are more skilled than those farther back. I had very
    few of those incidents where some numbskull weaves right in front of you.

    Andy Douglas MARS
     
  4. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Hi Jon, I've run the NYC marathon 5 times. It's a great run and fun, but a logistical challenge. The
    portajohns and the worlds longest urinal at the start are examples of some of the marathon
    challenges. I can't imagine how you get 29,000 bikes into the 5 boroughs and moving without mayhem.
    29,000 x 10' per bike = 290,000' = 290,000 / 5280 = 55 miles! Even riding 5 abreast is still 11
    miles of the biggest pace line on the planet! Might you describe the ride and logistics somewhat to
    give a feel for how this enormous event was done. How many miles is the ride? Thanks and
    congratulations? -- ~~~al.kubeluis..md.usa.earth.sun.milkyway.virgo.universe..corsa~~~

    "The Shinefelds" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > The 26th? annual NYC 5 Boroughs ride was held this afternoon and there
    were
    > dozens of bents. I saw everything from a home built lowracer with tail fairing from a MARS rider
    > to a Barcroft Columbia, Vanguards, HP's, RANS
    lwb
    > and swb, Easy Racers, delta and tadpole trikes, etc. It was great fun to see so many recumbents
    > and even more interesting to see how riders add
    their
    > individual touches to each bike. My riding buddy and I were on our VRexi.
    >
    > Recumbents and tandems got free front line passes. It was nice to be towards the front of the
    > ride, as we were riding with 29,000+ of our other best friends on all kinds of DF's. On the down
    > side there was at least
    one
    > significant crash involving 4 DF bikes and an endo at 20+ mph. I think
    the
    > weather was perfect for the ride, dry and overcast, temps in the 50's and 60's. The sun did appear
    > as we were returning to Battery Park on the
    Staten
    > Island Ferry.
    >
    > Was anyone else out there today? What were your impressions of the ride? Jon Shinefeld
     
  5. > Was anyone else out there today? What were your impressions of the ride? Jon Shinefeld

    I was there on my Barcroft Dakota. I saw the Barcroft Columbia. It appeared to be a Dad and his
    young son riding shotgun. I was starting to say hello but then realized he was having a cell phone
    conversation while riding. So...no conversation was possible and I pushed on.

    The ride for me is a chance to revisit New York and see some of my old high school buddies the day
    before the ride and then two of them also participated in the ride on Sunday. I was born in the
    Bronx and moved to Long Island (Levittown) when I was 10. Then moved to Huntington in Suffolk County
    for about 8 years or so before finally moving to Northern Virginia where I have lived for the past
    18 years. I was a LIRR commuter for almost 12 years. This year was my second time doing the ride. I
    also did it last year.

    Had a great time ! It seemed overall to have less bottlenecks than last year , though, there was one
    big walking period up one of the ramps to a bridge, do not seem to remember that happening last
    year. I am always impressed with how you can travel just about the entire length with no cars. It is
    very well organized and all the policeman, firefighters and volunteers while performing their tasks
    are also out there having a good time as well. It's as much a "Happening" as it is a bike ride.

    Larry Raphael Barcroft Dakota, #002, Metallic Blue Oakton, VA
     
  6. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Al Kubeluis wrote:
    >
    > Hi Jon, I've run the NYC marathon 5 times. It's a great run and fun, but a logistical challenge.
    > The portajohns and the worlds longest urinal at the start are examples of some of the marathon
    > challenges....

    Another reason to ride a fully-faired streamliner with a discharge tube!

    Tom Sherman - Various HPV's Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  7. "Al Kubeluis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi Jon, I've run the NYC marathon 5 times. It's a great run and fun, but a logistical challenge.
    > The portajohns and the worlds longest urinal at the start are examples of some of the marathon
    > challenges. I can't imagine how you get 29,000 bikes into the 5 boroughs and
    moving
    > without mayhem. 29,000 x 10' per bike = 290,000' = 290,000 / 5280 = 55 miles! Even riding 5
    > abreast is still 11 miles of the biggest pace line on the planet! Might you describe the ride and
    > logistics somewhat to give a feel for how this enormous event was done. How many miles is the
    > ride? Thanks and congratulations? --
    > ~~~al.kubeluis..md.usa.earth.sun.milkyway.virgo.universe..corsa~~~
    >
    Al - The ride itself is about 42 miles. Recumbents get free front line passes which means fewer
    jam ups except as Andrew mentioned, the intentional choke points to thin bike traffic. Starting up
    front also means generally smarter riders, or at least riders who are educable re holding thier
    line. Actually though I think the choke points created hazards, allowing the testosterone crazed
    STA's a couple hundred yards to build unsafe speeds before running up the rear of the next bunch.
    But (depending on what you think is important) the port - a - pots were still clean when we
    reached them.

    It is my experience that things are quite different towards the back. Three or four years ago it
    took us over 90 minutes to reach Central Park. And once we reached it there was a blood bath at the
    bottom of two of the long sweeping downhills, as inexperienced riders lost control at relatively
    high speed. It was crazy enough with the crashes and the long waits to go over the Verrazano that
    this was my first trip back since then.

    Having said that, this ride was superbly organized from start to finish, only the way that New
    Yorkers can accomplish. No, I am not from New York, but the organization was tremendous. They even
    managed to painlessly accomodate knuckleheads like me who showed up without my vest. It seemed as
    though there were hundreds of marshalls along the route. The rest stops were all stocked with great
    supplies and personed by people with smiling faces. And the most amazing part is the cooperation
    between organizers and the city that allows these roads to be closed to traffic for hours. I imagine
    that it must be worthwhile financially for the city to do all this, but still, they managed to pull
    it off in great style.

    If you want, e mail me privately with your address and I'll forward you the ride literature.

    Jon Shinefeld Philadelphia, PA
     
  8. John

    John Guest

    I was there for my 3rd consecutive ride on a WizWheelz and had a great time, and for the first time
    witnessed no serious accidents (though the unfortunate one on the Queensboro Bridge caused a massive
    slowdown and delay). The organizers and volunteers are to be greatly commended, as it is their
    efforts which make it so pleasant. My wife and I stay in lower Manhattan for the weekend and find
    the entire experience well worth repeating.
     
  9. The 5 Boro Bike Tour has all the riders lining up from Battery Park to Worth Street. (this is about
    a 1/2 mile start line). Within the first 15 minutes, the "racers" make it to the front, while the
    slower people tend to drift backwards.

    There are intentional traffic jams leading up to Central Park to allow car traffic to cross at
    various streets. Once the bikes leave Central Park, they tend to space themselves out.

    The 5BB tour is not a race. The front line passes for recumbents make it much nicer because it gives
    you at least a 15 minute lead in the beginning. If you pace yourself right, and don't waste too much
    time at the rest stops, you can avoid most other traffic jams. For example, we skipped the first
    rest stop at 116th street and went right to Astoria Park. At Astoria, we skipped the porta pots, and
    went two miles more to Con Ed where there were much smaller porta pot lines. We then took a small
    break at the final stop by the Verrazano.
     
  10. I was on the ride as well. We were towards the Battery Park so it was much too crowded. I saw only a
    few recumbents, some BikeEs, Rans Rockets and a couple Bigha bikes. I talked to the guys on Bighas
    who worked at Bigha, but unfortunate for me my spoken english is not the best. I saw their website
    on the card they gave me and they are posting pictures of the ride on the weblog section of the
    site. It makes me wish I had taken a camera for photographing the scenery. Hashim

    "The Shinefelds" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > The 26th? annual NYC 5 Boroughs ride was held this afternoon and there were dozens of bents. I saw
    > everything from a home built lowracer with tail fairing from a MARS rider to a Barcroft Columbia,
    > Vanguards, HP's, RANS lwb and swb, Easy Racers, delta and tadpole trikes, etc. It was great fun to
    > see so many recumbents and even more interesting to see how riders add their individual touches to
    > each bike. My riding buddy and I were on our VRexi.
    >
    > Recumbents and tandems got free front line passes. It was nice to be towards the front of the
    > ride, as we were riding with 29,000+ of our other best friends on all kinds of DF's. On the down
    > side there was at least one significant crash involving 4 DF bikes and an endo at 20+ mph. I think
    > the weather was perfect for the ride, dry and overcast, temps in the 50's and 60's. The sun did
    > appear as we were returning to Battery Park on the Staten Island Ferry.
    >
    > Was anyone else out there today? What were your impressions of the ride? Jon Shinefeld
     
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