50 Conditions That Mimic "ADHD"

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Theta, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. Theta

    Theta Guest

    ADHD is diagnosed by "professionals" who form their opinion by
    observing a child's behavior. There are no brain scans, blood tests,
    or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. The problem
    with this is there are many other problems that have the same symptoms
    of ADHD. Many parents, because of not knowing, settle for ADHD as a
    diagnosis before looking at everything. For example, any problem
    dealing with the fuels of the body: water, food, blood and air can
    cause behavior problems. Water, food, blood and air to the body are
    just like gas and oil to a car. If you put bad gas or have old or the
    wrong oil in your car, it will act up just like a child acts up when
    eating foods they are allergic to, drinking or breathing contaminated
    water or air or having blood disorders.

    There are also many medical, biological, emotional and mental
    conditions that mimic ADHD also. For those who are searching for
    reasons behind their child's behavior, here are some possibilities.
    Only settle for the diagnosis of ADHD after checking out all of these
    problems and many more.

    http://adhdparentssupportgroup.homestead.com/50conditionsmimicingADHD.html

    For information on ADD/ADHD, medications, clinical trials and more,
    visit http://groups.msn.com/psychbusters/addadhd.msnw


    --
    Decoding Psychiatric Propaganda
    http://groups.msn.com/psychbusters

    "If you don't control your mind, someone else will." - John Allston.
     
    Tags:


  2. Eric Bohlman

    Eric Bohlman Guest

    [email protected] (Theta) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > ADHD is diagnosed by "professionals" who form their opinion by
    > observing a child's behavior. There are no brain scans, blood tests,
    > or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. The problem
    > with this is there are many other problems that have the same symptoms
    > of ADHD. Many parents, because of not knowing, settle for ADHD as a


    For *any* medical condition, there are many other problems that have the
    same symptoms as it. That's why physicians use differential diagnosis
    rather than just jumping on the first thing that matches. That's why the
    medical records a physician keeps are expected to show a differential when
    he diagnoses a patient with a condition.

    If a physician is diagnosing ADHD without ruling out other causes of the
    patient's symptoms, he's not following a legally appropriate standard of
    care.

    > diagnosis before looking at everything. For example, any problem
    > dealing with the fuels of the body: water, food, blood and air can
    > cause behavior problems. Water, food, blood and air to the body are
    > just like gas and oil to a car. If you put bad gas or have old or the
    > wrong oil in your car, it will act up just like a child acts up when
    > eating foods they are allergic to, drinking or breathing contaminated
    > water or air or having blood disorders.


    But a physician is not required to include in the differential explanations
    that have been disproven. There's no evidence that any of the things you
    mentioned can cause ADHD-type symptoms.
     
  3. "Theta" <[email protected]> wrote
    > ADHD is diagnosed by "professionals" who form their opinion by
    > observing a child's behavior. There are no brain scans, blood tests,
    > or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. ...


    No, they don't even do that. The official guidelines say that the
    diagnosis is supposed to based on home and school settings, and
    the physician is not likely to make any observations there. He bases
    the diagnosis on 2nd-hand or 3rd-hand accounts of that behavior,
    as reported by a parent or a teacher.
     
  4. Jan

    Jan Guest

    >Subject: Re: 50 Conditions That Mimic "ADHD"
    >From: Eric Bohlman [email protected]
    >Date: 9/20/2003 4:21 PM Pacific Standard Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    >
    >[email protected] (Theta) wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> ADHD is diagnosed by "professionals" who form their opinion by
    >> observing a child's behavior. There are no brain scans, blood tests,
    >> or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. The problem
    >> with this is there are many other problems that have the same symptoms
    >> of ADHD. Many parents, because of not knowing, settle for ADHD as a

    >
    >For *any* medical condition, there are many other problems that have the
    >same symptoms as it.


    And the MD has a tiny *organized medicine recipe book, if it *ain't in there*
    you are crazy.

    >That's why physicians use differential diagnosis
    >rather than just jumping on the first thing that matches.


    No, that's why there are so MANY UNANSWERED health problems. REAL diseases are
    DENIED.

    >That's why the
    >medical records a physician keeps are expected to show a differential when
    >he diagnoses a patient with a condition.


    And what percentage have NO diagnoses???

    >If a physician is diagnosing ADHD without ruling out other causes of the
    >patient's symptoms, he's not following a legally appropriate standard of
    >care.


    Written by *organized medicine*.

    > diagnosis before looking at everything. For example, any problem
    >> dealing with the fuels of the body: water, food, blood and air can
    >> cause behavior problems. Water, food, blood and air to the body are
    >> just like gas and oil to a car. If you put bad gas or have old or the
    >> wrong oil in your car, it will act up just like a child acts up when
    >> eating foods they are allergic to, drinking or breathing contaminated
    >> water or air or having blood disorders.

    >
    >But a physician is not required to include in the differential explanations
    >that have been disproven. There's no evidence that any of the things you
    >mentioned can cause ADHD-type symptoms.


    Well, I wonder why the ADD diagnoses keep climbing?????

    Jan
     
  5. Mark D Morin

    Mark D Morin Guest

    On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 00:54:20 GMT, "Roger Schlafly"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Theta" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> ADHD is diagnosed by "professionals" who form their opinion by
    >> observing a child's behavior. There are no brain scans, blood tests,
    >> or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. ...

    >
    >No, they don't even do that. The official guidelines say that the
    >diagnosis is supposed to based on home and school settings, and
    >the physician is not likely to make any observations there. He bases
    >the diagnosis on 2nd-hand or 3rd-hand accounts of that behavior,
    >as reported by a parent or a teacher.
    >


    When I go in for a blood test, the physician does not examine my
    blood. S/he relies on the second or third hand summaries from a
    technician.

    ====================================================
    You fool yourself if you imagine what you or others
    say about others is their problem, rather than your
    problem.

    You can trash people all you want, but your trashing
    them isn't, in itself, a problem for them.
    Linda Gore 08/06/03

    http://home.gwi.net/~mdmpsyd/index.htm
     
  6. "Mark D Morin" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >No, they don't even do that. The official guidelines say that the
    > >diagnosis is supposed to based on home and school settings, and
    > >the physician is not likely to make any observations there. He bases
    > >the diagnosis on 2nd-hand or 3rd-hand accounts of that behavior,
    > >as reported by a parent or a teacher.

    > When I go in for a blood test, the physician does not examine my
    > blood. S/he relies on the second or third hand summaries from a
    > technician.


    Good. The technician is probably well-trained to examine blood,
    and uses objective criteria.
     
  7. Mark D Morin

    Mark D Morin Guest

    On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 04:09:39 GMT, "Roger Schlafly"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Mark D Morin" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> >No, they don't even do that. The official guidelines say that the
    >> >diagnosis is supposed to based on home and school settings, and
    >> >the physician is not likely to make any observations there. He bases
    >> >the diagnosis on 2nd-hand or 3rd-hand accounts of that behavior,
    >> >as reported by a parent or a teacher.

    >> When I go in for a blood test, the physician does not examine my
    >> blood. S/he relies on the second or third hand summaries from a
    >> technician.

    >
    >Good. The technician is probably well-trained to examine blood,
    >and uses objective criteria.


    no less well trained than teachers and the tests are no more
    objective. I take it you've never had the same sample retested with
    differing results? I also take it that you have never seen any of the
    tests administered to someone suspected of having ADHD.
    >


    ====================================================
    The "anti" group on any subject can stall it forever
    by asking an unlimited number of questions and feeding
    an unlimited number of fears. And if we require that
    something be absolutely safe and absolutely understood
    before we use it, we'll never use anything,
    because we'll never have absolute understanding.
    David Wright 9/20/03

    http://home.gwi.net/~mdmpsyd/index.htm
     
  8. Mark Probert

    Mark Probert Guest

    "Roger Schlafly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Theta" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > ADHD is diagnosed by "professionals" who form their opinion by
    > > observing a child's behavior. There are no brain scans, blood tests,
    > > or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. ...

    >
    > No, they don't even do that. The official guidelines say that the
    > diagnosis is supposed to based on home and school settings, and
    > the physician is not likely to make any observations there. He bases
    > the diagnosis on 2nd-hand or 3rd-hand accounts of that behavior,
    > as reported by a parent or a teacher.


    You are such an idiot.

    First of, there are THREE "official" guidelines:

    1. The DSM
    2. The diagnostic protocol as published on the AAP website
    3. The treatment protocol as published on the AAP website.

    One thig is for sure, you sure do have a bad case of Posting Partial Facts
    Disorder.
     
  9. Mike Gormez

    Mike Gormez Guest

    Don't get fooled folks, 'theta' is a posting Scientology inspired
    crap. After he failed to post his BS in alt.religion.scientolgy and
    getting away with it he has been on a search for newsgroups where he
    and the UFO nut cult (www.xenu.net) aren't that well known.

    FYI: Scientology says that there aren't any mental illnesses. It is
    all 'spritual'. And they are force to sign such a statement as well.


    Recently new Scientology contracts emerged after one of their members
    died (lisa.whyaretheydead.net) under their care and they want to
    protect themselves better against prosecution. Ask yourself if you
    would sign this:

    "It is my strongly held religious belief that all mental problems are
    spiritual in nature and that there is no such thing as a mentally
    incompetent person-- only those suffering from spiritual upset of one
    kind or another dramatized by an individual. I reject all psychiatric
    labels and intend for this Contract to clearly memorialize my desire
    to be helped exclusively through religious, spiritual means and not
    through any form of psychiatric treatment, specifically including
    involuntary commitment based on so-called lack of competence. Under no
    circumstances, at any time, do I wish to be denied my right to care
    from members of my religion to the exclusion of psychiatric care or
    psychiatric directed care, regardless of what any psychiatrist,
    medical person, designated member of the state or family member may
    assert supposedly on my behalf."

    http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs.cmu....ology/ReleaseForms/Introspection-Release.html


    Mike Gormez
    --
    http://whyaretheydead.net
     
  10. "Jan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >Subject: Re: 50 Conditions That Mimic "ADHD"
    > >From: Eric Bohlman [email protected]
    > >Date: 9/20/2003 4:21 PM Pacific Standard Time
    > >Message-id: <[email protected]>
    > >
    > >[email protected] (Theta) wrote in
    > >news:[email protected]:
    > >
    > >> ADHD is diagnosed by "professionals" who form their opinion by
    > >> observing a child's behavior. There are no brain scans, blood tests,
    > >> or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. The problem
    > >> with this is there are many other problems that have the same symptoms
    > >> of ADHD. Many parents, because of not knowing, settle for ADHD as a

    > >
    > >For *any* medical condition, there are many other problems that have the
    > >same symptoms as it.

    >
    > And the MD has a tiny *organized medicine recipe book, if it *ain't in

    there*
    > you are crazy.
    >
    > >That's why physicians use differential diagnosis
    > >rather than just jumping on the first thing that matches.

    >
    > No, that's why there are so MANY UNANSWERED health problems. REAL diseases

    are
    > DENIED.
    >
    > >That's why the
    > >medical records a physician keeps are expected to show a differential

    when
    > >he diagnoses a patient with a condition.

    >
    > And what percentage have NO diagnoses???
    >
    > >If a physician is diagnosing ADHD without ruling out other causes of the
    > >patient's symptoms, he's not following a legally appropriate standard of
    > >care.

    >
    > Written by *organized medicine*.
    >
    > > diagnosis before looking at everything. For example, any problem
    > >> dealing with the fuels of the body: water, food, blood and air can
    > >> cause behavior problems. Water, food, blood and air to the body are
    > >> just like gas and oil to a car. If you put bad gas or have old or the
    > >> wrong oil in your car, it will act up just like a child acts up when
    > >> eating foods they are allergic to, drinking or breathing contaminated
    > >> water or air or having blood disorders.

    > >
    > >But a physician is not required to include in the differential

    explanations
    > >that have been disproven. There's no evidence that any of the things you
    > >mentioned can cause ADHD-type symptoms.

    >
    > Well, I wonder why the ADD diagnoses keep climbing?????


    Let me answer that for you, since you asked...

    Beginning in 1991, the US Department of Edcuation and Sandbox Management,
    under Bush the First, mandated that the schools throughout the USA actually
    take a good hard look at why kids were not learning, and then do something
    about it.

    Well, they did. When kids were not learning the Committee of Special Ed (or
    whatever the local distrcit calls it) began to look. Lo and behold, kids had
    learning disabilities and also had ADD or ADHD.

    When responsible parents became aware of why their kid was not learning,
    they did something about it and went to their doctors to find help.

    Thus, the increase in ADHD diagnosis.

    I have simplified it for you, but, this is the way it was.
     
  11. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    "Roger Schlafly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Mark D Morin" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > >No, they don't even do that. The official guidelines say that the
    > > >diagnosis is supposed to based on home and school settings, and
    > > >the physician is not likely to make any observations there. He bases
    > > >the diagnosis on 2nd-hand or 3rd-hand accounts of that behavior,
    > > >as reported by a parent or a teacher.

    > > When I go in for a blood test, the physician does not examine my
    > > blood. S/he relies on the second or third hand summaries from a
    > > technician.

    >
    > Good. The technician is probably well-trained to examine blood,
    > and uses objective criteria.


    So are teachers. And the diagnosis requires impairments from two or more
    areas, including school and home.
     
  12. SumBuny

    SumBuny Guest

    "Theta" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Only settle for the diagnosis of ADHD after checking out all of these
    > problems and many more.



    One piece of sound advice...many of us *have* been diagnosed ADHD after
    everything else was ruled out....

    ....yet still seem to get lambasted for "drugging" our kids and for being
    ADHD (when we are contantly told there is no such thing)....any advice on
    that?

    Buny
     
  13. SumBuny

    SumBuny Guest

    "Roger Schlafly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Theta" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > ADHD is diagnosed by "professionals" who form their opinion by
    > > observing a child's behavior. There are no brain scans, blood tests,
    > > or anything else definite that is used during diagnosis. ...

    >
    > No, they don't even do that. The official guidelines say that the
    > diagnosis is supposed to based on home and school settings, and
    > the physician is not likely to make any observations there. He bases
    > the diagnosis on 2nd-hand or 3rd-hand accounts of that behavior,
    > as reported by a parent or a teacher.



    What about those who are diagnosed after full Functional Behavioral
    Assessment, done not only by teachers, but by psychologists, behaviorists,
    therapists? or is this not "suficient" witnesses to share information with
    the child's psychiatrist for diagnosis?

    Buny
     
  14. jake

    jake Guest

    On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 15:26:01 -0400, "Jeff" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    >> Good. The technician is probably well-trained to examine blood,
    >> and uses objective criteria.

    >
    >So are teachers.


    What planet do YOU live on?

    http://shorterlink.com/?7RQSJL

    MR. SINCLAIR (HISTORY): I started drinking in my car in 1994. I would
    roll up the windows and sit in the east side of the parking lot. In
    the last space. There was coffee in the one, older thermos and scotch
    in the other, newer one. I was caught later that year. But...I would
    say that I definitely stopped caring soon after that.

    MR. KEROMAN (MATHEMATICS): Early on. Second semester of my first year.

    MR. PAPPAS (SOCIAL STUDIES): Once I was on this strange acne
    medication. It was making me feel completely different from how I
    usually, which is fine. It came to a head one day when I was
    chaperoning a field trip to the Museum of Natural History. I was
    feeling strange and I got off the bus and for some reason started
    crying because I wasn’t on the bus any longer. I didn’t want to go
    into the school, but I did. And they were looking at me, the kids on
    my field trip. And I felt shame. That was the beginning of something.

    MR. LEWIS (PE): I was standing there on the field and...I was standing
    out on the field in September and that’s when the geese droppings
    aren’t completely frozen yet, but they aren’t so wet that they just
    leak into the field. They’re solid. It’ late November when they
    actually freeze. So the droppings, which cover the field, were still
    slightly wet. Maybe four of these kids ever wear their soccer cleats,
    even after I asked them to. No one was wearing them that day and so
    these kids were sliding in this goose shit. And somehow one swallowed
    a piece. In a tackle, or something, but it was all over his face. And
    I just, you know...I just hated that kid. I had to clean him up.
    (pause) Yeah, but I guess that’s the moment.


    These teachers are real.
     
  15. jake

    jake Guest

    On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 14:31:48 -0500, "SumBuny"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Theta" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Only settle for the diagnosis of ADHD after checking out all of these
    >> problems and many more.

    >
    >
    >One piece of sound advice...many of us *have* been diagnosed ADHD after
    >everything else was ruled out....


    the most vociferous advocates of drugging other peoples children seem
    NOT have been however..but are professionals with a vested interest..



    >
    >...yet still seem to get lambasted for "drugging" our kids and for being
    >ADHD



    odd
    I have never seen anyone lambasted for "being ADHD"

    (when we are contantly told there is no such thing)....any advice on
    >that?


    as you are fully aware the diagnosis is contentious..
     
  16. SumBuny

    SumBuny Guest

    "jake" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 14:31:48 -0500, "SumBuny"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Theta" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >> Only settle for the diagnosis of ADHD after checking out all of these
    > >> problems and many more.

    > >
    > >
    > >One piece of sound advice...many of us *have* been diagnosed ADHD after
    > >everything else was ruled out....

    >
    > the most vociferous advocates of drugging other peoples children seem
    > NOT have been however..but are professionals with a vested interest..



    There are those who insist that the very medical professionals that diagnose
    ADHD *after* ruling out other things are the same "vociferous advocates of
    drugging other people's children"....

    <sigh> Those of us dealing with ADHD (or family members with it) cannot
    "win" that argument...

    >
    >
    >
    > >
    > >...yet still seem to get lambasted for "drugging" our kids and for being
    > >ADHD

    >
    >
    > odd
    > I have never seen anyone lambasted for "being ADHD"
    >
    > (when we are contantly told there is no such thing)....any advice on
    > >that?

    >
    > as you are fully aware the diagnosis is contentious..


    That "contention" is what seems to fuel those who constantly insist that we
    are not ADHD, we are "lazy, crazy, stupid, enabling, etc"...that is what I
    meant by being lambasted for being ADHD...

    Buny
     
  17. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    "jake" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 15:26:01 -0400, "Jeff" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    > >
    > >> Good. The technician is probably well-trained to examine blood,
    > >> and uses objective criteria.

    > >
    > >So are teachers.

    >
    > What planet do YOU live on?


    Planet earth.

    Teachers are not perfect. Most of them are there because they really care
    about students.

    Jeff
     
  18. jake

    jake Guest

    On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 15:08:13 -0500, "SumBuny"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"jake" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 14:31:48 -0500, "SumBuny"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >"Theta" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> >news:[email protected]
    >> >> Only settle for the diagnosis of ADHD after checking out all of these
    >> >> problems and many more.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> >One piece of sound advice...many of us *have* been diagnosed ADHD after
    >> >everything else was ruled out....

    >>
    >> the most vociferous advocates of drugging other peoples children seem
    >> NOT have been however..but are professionals with a vested interest..

    >
    >
    >There are those who insist that the very medical professionals that diagnose
    >ADHD *after* ruling out other things are the same "vociferous advocates of
    >drugging other people's children"....


    In my experience FWIMBW..on alt.support.attn-deficit that they are
    NOT medical professionals seems to be the bone of contention ..

    that is at the root ..I guess..
    It seems to be a "dustbin classification" Dxed when nothing else is
    found.

    >
    ><sigh> Those of us dealing with ADHD (or family members with it) cannot
    >"win" that argument...


    its a perennial..I guess
    Nobody can "win" but you seem to hold your corner..

    >
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> >
    >> >...yet still seem to get lambasted for "drugging" our kids and for being
    >> >ADHD

    >>
    >>
    >> odd
    >> I have never seen anyone lambasted for "being ADHD"
    >>
    >> (when we are contantly told there is no such thing)....any advice on
    >> >that?

    >>
    >> as you are fully aware the diagnosis is contentious..

    >
    >That "contention" is what seems to fuel those who constantly insist that we
    >are not ADHD, we are "lazy, crazy, stupid, enabling, etc"...that is what I
    >meant by being lambasted for being ADHD...


    In RL or on usenet?
    as you are probably aware.. its par for the course on usenet in most
    arenas..certainly this one where your crew never tire calling people
    stupid..etc
     
  19. jake

    jake Guest

    On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 16:08:20 -0400, "Jeff" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"jake" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 15:26:01 -0400, "Jeff" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Good. The technician is probably well-trained to examine blood,
    >> >> and uses objective criteria.
    >> >
    >> >So are teachers.

    >>
    >> What planet do YOU live on?

    >
    >Planet earth.
    >
    >Teachers are not perfect. Most of them are there because they really care
    >about students.


    I dont know about most
    many are there going through the motions earning a living.
    In any event they are NOT well trained to examine blood and do NOT
    have objective clinical criteria to Dx ADHD.

    They are there to teach not to engage in social engineering..


    >
    >Jeff
    >
     
  20. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    "jake" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 16:08:20 -0400, "Jeff" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"jake" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]
    > >> On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 15:26:01 -0400, "Jeff" <[email protected]>
    > >> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> Good. The technician is probably well-trained to examine blood,
    > >> >> and uses objective criteria.
    > >> >
    > >> >So are teachers.
    > >>
    > >> What planet do YOU live on?

    > >
    > >Planet earth.
    > >
    > >Teachers are not perfect. Most of them are there because they really care
    > >about students.

    >
    > I dont know about most
    > many are there going through the motions earning a living.
    > In any event they are NOT well trained to examine blood and do NOT
    > have objective clinical criteria to Dx ADHD.


    No, but they don't need to examine blood. Or make a diagnosis. What they
    need to do is report the child's behaviors to the doctor. That, along with
    their experience with working with kids, they are well qualified to do.

    > They are there to teach not to engage in social engineering..


    Part of teaching includes communicating with the parents and others about
    how their kids are doing in school and what they are doing in school.

    I don't know anyone who engages in social engineering.

    Jeff
    >
    > >
    > >Jeff
    > >

    >
     
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