50 Conditions That Mimic "ADHD"

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Theta, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. Depending on what I do, I make more over the summer than I do during the
    school year. Last year, I couldn't take an additional job during the
    summer so this year I'm taking a part-time after-school job.
    The part-time job is with a different agency, but pays the same amount
    as my teaching job. I'm a tutor for students who are homebound.

    Magi

    Bob LeChevalier wrote:
    > They cannot likely supplement their income at the hourly equivalent of
    > their salary.
     


  2. DeChiera

    DeChiera Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > Not for a new patient. This isn't the first time this has happened,
    > either. It happened in my last state too: I picked a doctor, but when I
    > called, she only saw new patients 3 times per month, and didn't have any
    > appointments for 2 weeks. The fact that I had no voice, and a fever of
    > 100 didn't make any difference. I was told to go to the ER. Which I'm
    > not wiling to do, as that isn't covered by my insurance and is just flat
    > out silly.
    >
    > Magi


    You might want to look into an insurance that covers ER visits. We have
    military Tricare, it seems to pay more and faster on emergency visits for my
    daughters accidents than any of the other services. As I am one of those
    impatient people, who like to have medical issues address as soon as
    possible vs. an assigned appointment ... ER is fine with me. I just bring a
    good book, something for the girls to do while waiting and snacks to nibble
    on. ER doctors have always be quite kind and helpful and will set up any
    followup needed in a timely manner.

    Leah aka
     
  3. I work 11 months a year, but I'm not eligible to earn leave. I do earn
    sick leave (3 hours per month). I can't use the sick leave before I
    earn it, and if I don't have enough sick leave, I don't get paid.
    If I don't work, I don't get paid.
    In some cases, if I do thing that go "above and beyond", like the day I
    stood in the rain for 12 hours to assist with a student activity on a
    Saturday, I am given comp time. If I have perfect attendance for a
    whole semester, I get 4 hours of comp time (of course, if you earn the
    comp time, you have to use it in the quarter it was given, so you can't
    really ever get perfect attendance if you earn comp time and you use
    it!). Comp time is given at the discretion of the administration: I do
    NOT get it when I go to required trainings. IE, I must go to CPR
    training and it goes 90 minutes past my usual work stop time. I won't
    be paid for that, and I won't get comp time for it. I also won't get it
    when I work on Saturday because I'm going to a reading conference, or
    when I attend required training for the community service club that I
    sponsor.
    I am paid for the 216 days I work. If I don't work because of a snow
    day, I make up that time at the end of the year and I'm not paid extra
    for that because I was already paid for that day.

    MAgi


    Nessa wrote:
    > we are both paid based on hourly work. the difference is the BENEFITS. I
    > earn leave he does not.
    >
    > Nessa
     
  4. There's a huge difference in going to the ER for an accident or a
    serious problem versus going to the ER for laryngitis and a fever of
    100. One is the purpose of the ER; the other is silly. The ER isn't a
    doctor's office and shouldn't be used as such. Its for EMERGENCIES.
    When its used as the doctor's office (as is the case in the inner city
    where I live and teach) true emergencies can't be seen in a timely fashion.

    Magi

    DeChiera wrote:
    > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Not for a new patient. This isn't the first time this has happened,
    >>either. It happened in my last state too: I picked a doctor, but when I
    >>called, she only saw new patients 3 times per month, and didn't have any
    >>appointments for 2 weeks. The fact that I had no voice, and a fever of
    >>100 didn't make any difference. I was told to go to the ER. Which I'm
    >>not wiling to do, as that isn't covered by my insurance and is just flat
    >>out silly.
    >>
    >>Magi

    >
    >
    > You might want to look into an insurance that covers ER visits. We have
    > military Tricare, it seems to pay more and faster on emergency visits for my
    > daughters accidents than any of the other services. As I am one of those
    > impatient people, who like to have medical issues address as soon as
    > possible vs. an assigned appointment ... ER is fine with me. I just bring a
    > good book, something for the girls to do while waiting and snacks to nibble
    > on. ER doctors have always be quite kind and helpful and will set up any
    > followup needed in a timely manner.
    >
    > Leah aka
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  5. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > Not for a new patient [that the wait is typically 9 days].
    > This isn't the first time this has happened,
    > either. It happened in my last state too: I picked a doctor, but when I
    > called, she only saw new patients 3 times per month, and didn't have any
    > appointments for 2 weeks. The fact that I had no voice, and a fever of
    > 100 didn't make any difference. I was told to go to the ER. Which I'm
    > not wiling to do, as that isn't covered by my insurance and is just flat
    > out silly.


    I agree that it would not have been appropriate to go to the ER (and so
    agree with the insurer not paying for it). However, three months for a new
    patient, while certainly not unheard of, is also not the norm. I also don't
    think it is good practice and would say that the doc in question probably
    should just close to new patients until (s)he can better serve the current
    ones (since you know they also have quite a bit of a wait). It is reasonable
    to expect to be seen expediently so if the insurer does not want to pay for
    ER visits (or urgent care?) then it would be reasonable for you to ask them
    for help indentifying where you might obtain the care you are paying for.

    Most practice management experts say that the current standard should be to
    try to get sick patients seen within a day or two (same day or next) and
    there are a number of scheduling schemes to help do this. The biggest
    barrier is that many docs, through years of poor mangement, have accrued a
    backlog that they would have to work through in order to catch up and
    implement them. FWIW my office offers to see all sick patients the same day
    provided they are not calling too close to closing (in which case they can
    be seen the next day).

    Another hurdle, which I suspect is operative in your case, is that docs
    never really fully embraced the implications (as far as their
    responsibilities) of HMO's. With fee for service patients it is clear who is
    and is not your patient. If you have seen them they are and if not there has
    never been any relationship. In captitated HMO's the doc is paid a set fee
    every month for being your doc whether he sees you or not. One upshot to
    this is that one way to make capitation profitable is to limit their access
    (another, the desired one, is to provide good care). In this case, however,
    the distinction between an established patient and not is artifical since
    (s)he has been collecting money for some time for being your doc. It is a
    bit disengenuous of him/her to collect all that money and then suddenly
    claim to not be your doctor when you actually ask to be seen.

    If this is the case one approach that might work (has in the past) would be
    to contact the insurance company and explain that despite collecting your
    capitation the doc is now claiming no relationship and giving you less
    access than his other patients (which when you word it that way is hard to
    not view as wrong). Suggest that if he will not see you that you switch docs
    to one who will have have all previous payments retroactively switched to
    the new party. That would probably get the attention of both the old doc and
    the new one. Not all insurers will do this but I have seen some do it in
    the past. Keep in mind that the insurance company is in the busienss of
    keeping you happy (within a certain cost limit) and does not care which doc
    you see or who they send the check to (within their panel, of course).

    --
    CBI, MD
     
  6. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > It is very hard to get a new general
    > physician... and I need one that is willing to work with a specialist
    > as well.


    They all should be.
     
  7. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > CBI wrote:
    > > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote

    in
    > > message news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >>As a doctor, you also get paid a hell of a lot more than I do.

    > >
    > >
    > > How is that relevant to whether you call spring break a paid vacation or
    > > not?

    > Its very relevant. Doctors really DO get paid vacations.


    Huh? I get no baseline salary and am completely paid on productivity. If I
    take a day off I am paid nothing. THAT is not getting a paid vacation.


    > I'm not
    > saying they don't work hard... or that they have better schedules than
    > teachers, because I know they don't. But there is a huge difference
    > that is made up by more money!


    Whether one salary or another is more worth it does not change whether the
    vacation is paid for or not. You take a week off for spring break and the
    next paycheck is the exact same. If I do my next check is smaller.

    --
    CBI
     
  8. Donna Metler

    Donna Metler Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > Yes, because we're paid for X number of days, and when you add days to
    > the contract, we're not paid for them!
    >
    > Magi
    >

    In addition, when extended contract time is allowed, the pay rate is often
    quite low. My school does extended day classes and extended school year
    classes. 4 weeks of extended school year, 4 hours a day earns a teacher,
    regardless of experience, a whopping $1000. Extended school day pays $15/hr,
    for up to 6 hours a week.

    In comparison, Sylvan learning centers pays $22.50 for their supplementary
    services program held in the school after hours.


    > CBI wrote:
    > > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:p[email protected]
    > >
    > >>Ever noticed what happens when a district tries to add days to a
    > >>teacher's work year?

    > >
    > >
    > > Yeah, the teachers object.
    > >
    > >

    >
     
  9. Donna Metler

    Donna Metler Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > CBI wrote:
    > > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote

    in
    > > message news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >>But I work more than 8 hours a day. I'm only PAID for 7.5 of the hours
    > >>I work though.

    > >
    > >
    > > If that is how your contract is worded then that is a legitimate gripe.

    My
    > > impression is that mosyt teacher's contracts are not worded to include

    how
    > > many hours they are to work (there may be a clause about minimum times

    to be
    > > on campus but not how many hours to work).

    > My contract says that I must be on campus from 7:30 to 3:30, M-F. I'm
    > actually on campus from 6:30 to 4:00. I wouldn't have to take as much
    > work home if I had the software I use to create some materials on my
    > computers at school, but I don't.
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >>>I don't know anyone who would consider an 8 hour day "crunch time". It
    > >>

    > > is
    > >
    > >>>the norm.
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>Uhm, yea... but the norm is also that people have flexibility in that
    > >>time. They don't need to BEG for time off to take care of an emergency.

    > >
    > >
    > > That is also not at all uncommon. I hear that complaint all the time.

    >
    > Funny. I've worked retail, food service, fast-food, engineering, temp,
    > and journalism. I've NEVER had to beg off for an emergency AND had to
    > arrange coverage for my position.
    >

    Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held responsible
    for what happens when you're not there.


    > Magi
    >
     
  10. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    > > The school schedule, as it exists, is
    > > antiquated. Students need to spend more time in school. With all the
    > > hootin and hollerin that takes place about excellence in education, no

    move
    > > has been made to extend the school year. How come?
    > > ~Cate

    >
    > It certainly couldn't be money. This is the richest nation in the world.


    Unfortunately, it is. Everyone sees education as something that benefits
    someone else. The rich send their kids to private schools while the poor
    don't think the kids are benefiting ("When am I ever going to use this?).
    What the rich (or anyone really) don't appreciate is how much they benefit
    from an educated population (both in terms of workers and consumers).

    Read "Wealth and the Commonwealth" by William Gates (Sr. not the Microsoft
    guy). The subject is ostensibly about the inheritance tax but much of the
    discussion is about how the rich benefit from general society and so have
    debt to it.

    --
    CBI
     
  11. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    >
    > BTW, my previous contract was very much the same. It spelled out
    > how long each contracted day was to the hour and the minute.
    >


    Then you should work it and not complain or take it up with the employer if
    he asks for more. If it is spelled out there should be no issue.

    --
    CBI
     
  12. CBI

    CBI Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > For those who reject that argument (on whatever grounds), I offer the
    > following which I consider conclusive: There have been occasions when
    > I and my colleagues HAVE worked during a vacation or holiday period.
    > We were ALWAYS paid a per diem for that work. Therefore, CLEARLY, the
    > district does not consider vacation or holidays as being "paid".
    > Since THEY are the employer, and since THEY have a vested interest in
    > considering these as "paid vacations" and DO NOT, then CLEARLY they
    > ARE NOT "paid vacations".
    >
    > In the face of both arguments, anyone claiming we have "paid
    > vacations" is either illogical, unable to read, or purposefully dense.


    Way to keep an open mind. Whatever, if you are going to declare that anyone
    who dares disagree with you must have something wrong with them then there
    is no point. it is one thing to have a firm opinion. Maintaining that it is
    impossible for you to be wrong is a different matter (and there is a word
    for it).

    The sad part is that you don't see the obvious flaw in the logic above.

    --
    CBI
     
  13. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]
    >
    > If I worked those "holiday breaks" (officially) my salary would be
    > approximately $5000 more than it is per year.


    So if you don't work the holiday your check is the same but if you do it is
    larger than normal. And you don't think this means it is a paid vacation
    day?

    --
    CBI
     
  14. teachrmama

    teachrmama Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    > >
    > > If I worked those "holiday breaks" (officially) my salary would be
    > > approximately $5000 more than it is per year.

    >
    > So if you don't work the holiday your check is the same but if you do it

    is
    > larger than normal. And you don't think this means it is a paid vacation
    > day?


    Well...yeah.....duh. If I *don't* work it I *don't* get money for
    it--so I'm *not* paid. If I DO work it, I DO get money for it-- so I
    AM paid. So, if I don't get money for it, it's not a paid vacation day!
     
  15. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held

    responsible
    > for what happens when you're not there.


    What?

    Medicine (including nursing and pharmacy)
    Law
    Engineering
    Accounting

    What profession can't be?

    --
    CBI
     
  16. teachrmama

    teachrmama Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > For those who reject that argument (on whatever grounds), I offer the
    > > following which I consider conclusive: There have been occasions when
    > > I and my colleagues HAVE worked during a vacation or holiday period.
    > > We were ALWAYS paid a per diem for that work. Therefore, CLEARLY, the
    > > district does not consider vacation or holidays as being "paid".
    > > Since THEY are the employer, and since THEY have a vested interest in
    > > considering these as "paid vacations" and DO NOT, then CLEARLY they
    > > ARE NOT "paid vacations".
    > >
    > > In the face of both arguments, anyone claiming we have "paid
    > > vacations" is either illogical, unable to read, or purposefully dense.

    >
    > Way to keep an open mind. Whatever, if you are going to declare that

    anyone
    > who dares disagree with you must have something wrong with them then there
    > is no point. it is one thing to have a firm opinion. Maintaining that it

    is
    > impossible for you to be wrong is a different matter (and there is a word
    > for it).
    >
    > The sad part is that you don't see the obvious flaw in the logic above.


    I missed the obvious flaw, too. Why don't you explain it to us.
     
  17. toto

    toto Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 02:22:04 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"toto" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 01:44:55 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >If you are int he US (which it doesn;t sound like you are) you should

    >change
    >> >docs.

    >>
    >> Oh, she is in the US all right, CBI.
    >>
    >> How is she to find a new doc who is any better than the ones she
    >> tried? Especially since she is probably limited by whatever health
    >> insurance the district does give her. Not every doctor takes the
    >> insurance and many people are limited to particular HMOs nowadays.

    >
    >The average "next appointment time" in the US is 9 days. Having to wait 6
    >mos is pretty crappy. Sounds like something that needs to be renegotiated.


    My docs here cannot get anyone in for a checkup unless you schedule
    about 3 months in advance, though they do get us in for emergencies
    in a day or two. Many docs, though, tell people to go to the ER for
    emergencies.


    --
    Dorothy

    There is no sound, no cry in all the world
    that can be heard unless someone listens ..

    The Outer Limits
     
  18. toto

    toto Guest

    On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 19:36:01 -0700, Joni Rathbun
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> >Most teacher contracts are based on a per diem rate.

    >>
    >> As are most every other contracts. What's your point?

    >
    >I never had a contract in the private sector set up like my
    >teaching contracts. My last salaried position allowed my employer
    >to call on me at will.


    So did my contracts with IBM and my husband's contracts
    and my son's contract currently.

    The problem is that teachers are treated only partly as salaried
    professionals and partly as hourly labor in both the contracts
    and the way administrators see them.


    --
    Dorothy

    There is no sound, no cry in all the world
    that can be heard unless someone listens ..

    The Outer Limits
     
  19. Joni Rathbun

    Joni Rathbun Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003, CBI wrote:

    >
    >
    > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    > >
    > > If I worked those "holiday breaks" (officially) my salary would be
    > > approximately $5000 more than it is per year.

    >
    > So if you don't work the holiday your check is the same but if you do it is
    > larger than normal. And you don't think this means it is a paid vacation
    > day?
    >


    You have Saturday off this week. If you work Saturday, your employer will
    pay you more money. If you don't work Saturday, you will receive your
    regular pay. And you think that means you are paid to work Saturday?
     
  20. Seveigny

    Seveigny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    > >
    > > BTW, my previous contract was very much the same. It spelled out
    > > how long each contracted day was to the hour and the minute.
    > >

    >
    > Then you should work it and not complain or take it up with the employer

    if
    > he asks for more. If it is spelled out there should be no issue.


    As the beloved Ronnie Reagan used to say "There you go again." We're not
    complaining, we're educating. You made a false statement, we corrected it.

    Cate

    --
    "Those that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
    Benjamin Franklin
     
Loading...