50 Conditions That Mimic "ADHD"

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Theta, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. Seveigny

    Seveigny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Seveigny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > The idea that someone becomes a teacher because they want to have
    > > lots of vacation time is ridiculous.

    >
    > I never said they did.
    >
    > > If you want to have lots of vacation
    > > time, go to work for a corporation and stay there for awhile.

    >
    > I would suggest working for the Federal government.


    I would suggest SBC. You'll make much more money and get better benefits.
    Cate

    --
    "Those that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
    Benjamin Franklin
     


  2. CBI wrote:
    > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Not for a new patient [that the wait is typically 9 days].
    >>This isn't the first time this has happened,
    >>either. It happened in my last state too: I picked a doctor, but when I
    >>called, she only saw new patients 3 times per month, and didn't have any
    >>appointments for 2 weeks. The fact that I had no voice, and a fever of
    >>100 didn't make any difference. I was told to go to the ER. Which I'm
    >>not wiling to do, as that isn't covered by my insurance and is just flat
    >>out silly.

    >
    >
    > I agree that it would not have been appropriate to go to the ER (and so
    > agree with the insurer not paying for it). However, three months for a new
    > patient, while certainly not unheard of, is also not the norm. I also don't
    > think it is good practice and would say that the doc in question probably
    > should just close to new patients until (s)he can better serve the current
    > ones (since you know they also have quite a bit of a wait). It is reasonable
    > to expect to be seen expediently so if the insurer does not want to pay for
    > ER visits (or urgent care?) then it would be reasonable for you to ask them
    > for help indentifying where you might obtain the care you are paying for.


    My current insurance pays for urgent care/walk-in clinics. That was
    where I went when I had pneumonia last year. That is a good resource
    for some, but not for me since I frequently get bronchitis (from having
    pneumonia a lot when I was little), and as I said, I need somebody
    willing to work with a specialist. I need one general doctor, not a
    rotating pick of whoever happens to be in the clinic at the time.
    Given that this has now happened twice (the wait to find a new doctor)
    in two states, and that in both states I have called multiple places, I
    am guessing this is far more common than you think it is. Both places
    were major metro areas, one very wealthy, and one city with a mix (my
    area varying widely within a 5 mile radius). Most of the people that
    live in the building that I rent are going to one of the two medical
    schools for something: dentistry, pharmacology, nursing, pediatrics,
    residency, interns, fellowships, etc. Both the medical schools near me
    are very well known, and I guarentee that one of them is very well
    respected.
    The first time this happened, I wrote a letter to the insurance company
    complaining about the issue... the insurance company sided with the
    doctor and said that when I was first assigned to her I should have made
    and paid for a "new patient appointment", and not waited until I got
    sick. The second time this happened, I started calling as soon as I
    moved to the area and had my insurance card... It didn't make any
    difference. I still couldn't get a new patient appointment.

    >
    > Most practice management experts say that the current standard should be to
    > try to get sick patients seen within a day or two (same day or next) and
    > there are a number of scheduling schemes to help do this. The biggest
    > barrier is that many docs, through years of poor mangement, have accrued a
    > backlog that they would have to work through in order to catch up and
    > implement them. FWIW my office offers to see all sick patients the same day
    > provided they are not calling too close to closing (in which case they can
    > be seen the next day).

    That is what I'm used to. That was also what my primary care physician
    in my last town (once I finally found her) did. If she were still on my
    health plan, I probably would've stayed with her: she's only 45 miles
    one way. I'm already driving 20-25 miles to the other doctor who isn't
    as (IMO) good. But i'm staying with the other doctor because right now
    I don't have time to go hunting yet another primary care doctor.

    >
    > Another hurdle, which I suspect is operative in your case, is that docs
    > never really fully embraced the implications (as far as their
    > responsibilities) of HMO's.

    I suppose it would be if I'd had an HMO in either of these cases. I
    didn't. I've had an HMO twice: Kaiser-Permanente and didn't have this
    problem when I was with them... In fact, the one time that I really did
    need to see a doctor because I had a significant fever (102), they were
    willing to get me in at ANY of their nearby sites because the one I
    normally went to wasn't available. They were willing to reimburse me
    for travel to the site as well.
    The other time was HealthGuard, and again, I never had this problem.
    The last two times I've had PPO's where I get to choose who I want to
    see and where. Obviously, if I stay "in network" with a doctor that
    they already work with, I pay less... but its not an HMO.

    Magi
     
  3. That's like saying that all teachers should be willing to work with
    parents. They should be, but we all know that they don't.
    I've interviewed primary care docs in the last 3 years since I started
    seeing a specialist on a regular basis that tell me they aren't
    interested in what my specialist has to say nor do they care. I hang up
    the phone at that point and don't even bother to make an appointment.
    This may be some of the problem with my finding a new primary care
    doctor, but I don't think so. This hasn't been a majority.

    Magi

    CBI wrote:
    > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]
    >
    >> It is very hard to get a new general
    >>physician... and I need one that is willing to work with a specialist
    >>as well.

    >
    >
    > They all should be.
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  4. I take a week off for spring break, and I lose 5 days of pay.

    Magi

    CBI wrote:
    > Whether one salary or another is more worth it does not change whether the
    > vacation is paid for or not. You take a week off for spring break and the
    > next paycheck is the exact same. If I do my next check is smaller.
    >
    > --
    > CBI
    >
    >
     
  5. I'm moving to your area. The Sylvan here only pays $10/hour to the
    teachers working there. I don't have any idea how they manage to find
    teachers, but they do.
    In the past, I've gotten more money doing summer school/ESY than I have
    teaching during the regular school year. The difference is that I'm
    always one level higher over the summer than I am normally during the
    year. I'm a "specialist" instead of "classroom teacher" or in a
    different position, "transition coordinator". The latter position paid
    more and I was required to work more days.
    Last summer, though, I earned LESS because I worked for the same
    institution doing extended school year. I make less working for them
    than I made working for the public school, and I can't make it up over
    the summer.

    Magi

    Donna Metler wrote:
    > In addition, when extended contract time is allowed, the pay rate is often
    > quite low. My school does extended day classes and extended school year
    > classes. 4 weeks of extended school year, 4 hours a day earns a teacher,
    > regardless of experience, a whopping $1000. Extended school day pays $15/hr,
    > for up to 6 hours a week.
    >
    > In comparison, Sylvan learning centers pays $22.50 for their supplementary
    > services program held in the school after hours.
     
  6. There is that catch where they list your duties, "other duties as
    assigned". I'm *assigned* a case load, and if that means I have to do
    extra work because I've got a group of high-profile kids, or I want to
    actually TEACH them, then I have to do the time.
    I'm not paid for any of the prep work or extra work such as grading,
    attending IEP meetings, testing a student, etc.

    Magi

    CBI wrote:
    > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    >
    >>BTW, my previous contract was very much the same. It spelled out
    >>how long each contracted day was to the hour and the minute.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Then you should work it and not complain or take it up with the employer if
    > he asks for more. If it is spelled out there should be no issue.
    >
    > --
    > CBI
    >
    >
     
  7. If you're a doctor, and you're off, you're off. People can page you,
    but if you're really off, you have coverage. You're not responsible.
    If I'm off, and one of my kids has a melt down, you'd better believe
    that they find me and let me know about it.
    I always have to leave a phone number where I can be reached when I'm
    off school. This includes "summer break".
    I know doctors do this also, and some lawyers... but they get paid a
    lot more than I do.

    Magi

    CBI wrote:
    > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    >>Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held

    >
    > responsible
    >
    >>for what happens when you're not there.

    >
    >
    > What?
    >
    > Medicine (including nursing and pharmacy)
    > Law
    > Engineering
    > Accounting
    >
    > What profession can't be?
    >
    > --
    > CBI
    >
    >
     
  8. I am expected to do all my work, no matter if it goes over the time I'm
    required to work. (Salaried)
    I am required to clock in and adhere to a specific set schedule that has
    no flexibility in it. (Hourly)
    I am required to be available at all times and hours to my employer, and
    they can call me at home anytime (Salaried). And yes, this has happened
    more than once.
    I am paid hourly, and if I am 15-20 minutes late, I am docked that time
    from my check. (Hourly).

    Magi

    toto wrote:
    > The problem is that teachers are treated only partly as salaried
    > professionals and partly as hourly labor in both the contracts
    > and the way administrators see them.
     
  9. Joni Rathbun

    Joni Rathbun Guest

    On 19 Oct 2003, Magi D. Shepley wrote:

    > I am expected to do all my work, no matter if it goes over the time I'm
    > required to work. (Salaried)
    > I am required to clock in and adhere to a specific set schedule that has
    > no flexibility in it. (Hourly)
    > I am required to be available at all times and hours to my employer, and
    > they can call me at home anytime (Salaried). And yes, this has happened
    > more than once.


    In all of my public school contracts, there have been limits placed on how
    the employer can use us beyond the defined work day. In my current district,
    they can call on me (with notice) three times out of the entire year.
    In my previous district, they could keep me longer one hour per week.
    I believe this to be typical - in one form or another.

    When I was a truly salaried employee outside of education, there were no
    limits stipulated thus, in that particular case, CBI or Moron's argument
    that one is contracted for a particular length of time would be
    partially valid. As per my public school teaching contracts, however, it
    would not.
     
  10. nknisley

    nknisley Guest

    DeChiera wrote:

    > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]catsincyberspace.concentriccircles.net> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Not for a new patient. This isn't the first time this has happened,
    >>either. It happened in my last state too: I picked a doctor, but when I
    >>called, she only saw new patients 3 times per month, and didn't have any
    >>appointments for 2 weeks. The fact that I had no voice, and a fever of
    >>100 didn't make any difference. I was told to go to the ER. Which I'm
    >>not wiling to do, as that isn't covered by my insurance and is just flat
    >>out silly.
    >>
    >>Magi

    >
    >
    > You might want to look into an insurance that covers ER visits. We have
    > military Tricare, it seems to pay more and faster on emergency visits for my
    > daughters accidents than any of the other services. As I am one of those
    > impatient people, who like to have medical issues address as soon as
    > possible vs. an assigned appointment ... ER is fine with me. I just bring a
    > good book, something for the girls to do while waiting and snacks to nibble
    > on. ER doctors have always be quite kind and helpful and will set up any
    > followup needed in a timely manner.
    >


    I don't know what hospital you go to with your daughters, but...

    Recently, early one evening, a member of my family was in an accident.
    We tried to reach his regular doctors, but couldn't. Since he was in
    severe pain, and we thought he might have a broken or dislocated bone,
    we went to the ER, located on the fringes of a large urban city.

    We got to the ER around 7 PM. He was triaged around 7:30 and put on the
    "fast track" for "urgent care." At 8:30, the hospital got his insurance
    information and paperwork completed. He sat in pain in the "urgent care"
    waiting area until he saw the "urgent care" doctor at 11 PM. After his
    exam and x-rays, he was discharged at 1 AM with prescriptions for pain
    medication.

    Because he was still in terrible pain, we then had to drive to the only
    all-night pharmacy in the area to have the prescriptions filled. He
    finally got home at 2 AM and was able to take his medication and get
    some relief for the pain he'd been enduring for over 7 hours.

    I sure would hate to be a patient not on the "fast track" for "urgent care"!

    Before I'd go to an ER myself, I'd *really* have to be in an emergency
    situation--like something that might kill me if I couldn't wait until my
    regular doctor's office opened for business. And, maybe, not even then.
    (Joking)

    Oh, and as for myself, sitting for all those hours in the waiting room:
    I don't remember being so bored in ages as I was that night. For the
    first time in memory, I read that day's entire newspaper. I also played
    games on my PDA, watched Jay Leno and Conan O'Brien on the waiting room
    TV, and had started doing the paper's crossword puzzles before we were
    able to leave.

    You know, sometimes I do wish my life was less, um, exciting, but, the
    hours of boredom that evening was excruciating.


    Nancy
    Unique, like everyone else
     
  11. toto

    toto Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 11:20:43 -0500, "Donna Metler"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held responsible
    >for what happens when you're not there.


    And in my preschool, you have to call a sub for yourself when you are
    ill. No one does that for you, so you can be almost dead, but in
    theory, you have to get up and call a sub for yourself to cover the
    classroom.


    --
    Dorothy

    There is no sound, no cry in all the world
    that can be heard unless someone listens ..

    The Outer Limits
     
  12. toto

    toto Guest

    On 19 Oct 2003 20:13:33 GMT, "Magi D. Shepley"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I always have to leave a phone number where I can be reached when I'm
    >off school. This includes "summer break".
    >I know doctors do this also, and some lawyers... but they get paid a
    >lot more than I do.


    Actually many professionals do have pagers. My husband had one
    when he was working for IBM, but only for certain projects.


    --
    Dorothy

    There is no sound, no cry in all the world
    that can be heard unless someone listens ..

    The Outer Limits
     
  13. DeChiera

    DeChiera Guest

    If that is the only place to get service and your insurance is telling you
    to go there ... then, that is were a person should go.

    Sometimes when moving to a new area, people are not familiar with the
    doctors that have available space for new patients. But going to the ER or
    Urgent Healthcare you can be referred to an available doctor for follow-up
    and if you like the doctor you can be asked to be put on his list as a new
    patient.

    When a child of mine is ill ... I do not feel it is silly to get them
    treatment from whomever, wherever and have NEVER been taken to task by the
    personnel in the emergency room for doing so. If we are waiting our turn
    decided by the triage person as to the severity of the need, who are we
    hurting. I don't know too much about inner cities hospitals, so you may
    have a valid point ... I have just never run up against in my experiences.

    Leah aka .... hoping things work out for you :)



    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > There's a huge difference in going to the ER for an accident or a
    > serious problem versus going to the ER for laryngitis and a fever of
    > 100. One is the purpose of the ER; the other is silly. The ER isn't a
    > doctor's office and shouldn't be used as such. Its for EMERGENCIES.
    > When its used as the doctor's office (as is the case in the inner city
    > where I live and teach) true emergencies can't be seen in a timely

    fashion.
    >
    > Magi
    >
    > DeChiera wrote:
    > > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote

    in
    > > message news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >>Not for a new patient. This isn't the first time this has happened,
    > >>either. It happened in my last state too: I picked a doctor, but when I
    > >>called, she only saw new patients 3 times per month, and didn't have any
    > >>appointments for 2 weeks. The fact that I had no voice, and a fever of
    > >>100 didn't make any difference. I was told to go to the ER. Which I'm
    > >>not willing to do, as that isn't covered by my insurance and is just

    flat
    > >>out silly.
    > >>
    > >>Magi

    > >
    > >
    > > You might want to look into an insurance that covers ER visits. We

    have
    > > military Tricare, it seems to pay more and faster on emergency visits

    for my
    > > daughters accidents than any of the other services. As I am one of

    those
    > > impatient people, who like to have medical issues address as soon as
    > > possible vs. an assigned appointment ... ER is fine with me. I just

    bring a
    > > good book, something for the girls to do while waiting and snacks to

    nibble
    > > on. ER doctors have always be quite kind and helpful and will set up

    any
    > > follow-up needed in a timely manner.
    > >
    > > Leah aka
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
     
  14. Donna Metler

    Donna Metler Guest

    "teachrmama" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:p[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > If I worked those "holiday breaks" (officially) my salary would be
    > > > approximately $5000 more than it is per year.

    > >
    > > So if you don't work the holiday your check is the same but if you do it

    > is
    > > larger than normal. And you don't think this means it is a paid vacation
    > > day?

    >
    > Well...yeah.....duh. If I *don't* work it I *don't* get money for
    > it--so I'm *not* paid. If I DO work it, I DO get money for it-- so I
    > AM paid. So, if I don't get money for it, it's not a paid vacation day!
    >


    My last paycheck in December and 1st paycheck in January are both for 1
    week, not two, because of the two week Winter Break. Similarly, there is a
    paycheck in the spring which is for 1 week due to Spring break. So, no,
    those are NOT paid holidays.


    >
     
  15. Donna Metler

    Donna Metler Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > I'm moving to your area. The Sylvan here only pays $10/hour to the
    > teachers working there. I don't have any idea how they manage to find
    > teachers, but they do.


    This is for the Supplemental services program, which the school district
    must pay for under NCLB. Sylvan hires the teachers-generally, anyone from
    the school with a full certificate who wants to sign up, sends them to 1
    week of training, and then they teach small groups of kids three days a
    week.


    I don't know what the center-based programs parents pay for directly pay-it
    wouldn't surprise me if the supplemental services positions pay more, since
    they're on the district/state's dime.


    > In the past, I've gotten more money doing summer school/ESY than I have
    > teaching during the regular school year. The difference is that I'm
    > always one level higher over the summer than I am normally during the
    > year. I'm a "specialist" instead of "classroom teacher" or in a
    > different position, "transition coordinator". The latter position paid
    > more and I was required to work more days.
    > Last summer, though, I earned LESS because I worked for the same
    > institution doing extended school year. I make less working for them
    > than I made working for the public school, and I can't make it up over
    > the summer.
    >
    > Magi
    >
    > Donna Metler wrote:
    > > In addition, when extended contract time is allowed, the pay rate is

    often
    > > quite low. My school does extended day classes and extended school year
    > > classes. 4 weeks of extended school year, 4 hours a day earns a teacher,
    > > regardless of experience, a whopping $1000. Extended school day pays

    $15/hr,
    > > for up to 6 hours a week.
    > >
    > > In comparison, Sylvan learning centers pays $22.50 for their

    supplementary
    > > services program held in the school after hours.

    >
     
  16. Donna Metler

    Donna Metler Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    > > Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held

    > responsible
    > > for what happens when you're not there.

    >
    > What?
    >
    > Medicine (including nursing and pharmacy)
    > Law
    > Engineering
    > Accounting
    >
    > What profession can't be?
    >

    Do you have to find your substitute, write the plans, create the materials,
    and be tested on what the patients do when you're not there? If you have a
    substitute doctor or lawyer, can the regular one be sued for malpractice or
    disbarred? A classroom teacher is held accountable for their student's
    performance, regardless of whether the teacher is physically present or not.


    > --
    > CBI
    >
    >
     
  17. SumBuny

    SumBuny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > I think with this argument you guys are just rearranging the deck chairs.
    > You contract for a certain number of days (usually about 180) over a

    certain
    > period of time (usually approx Sept into June) and get a paycheck

    regularly
    > during that time frame. Most people would call a week where you don't go
    > into work and do recieve a check a paid vacaion.



    What about those who do not choose to have their 183 days' paychecks
    distributed over 365 days? IIRC, the claim was that they got the summers as
    "paid vacations" because they received a check...what happens to those who
    do not?


    Buny
     
  18. SumBuny

    SumBuny Guest

    "teachrmama" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:Rwhkb.2217$Uz6.66[email protected]
    > > I think with this argument you guys are just rearranging the deck

    chairs.
    > > You contract for a certain number of days (usually about 180) over a

    > certain
    > > period of time (usually approx Sept into June) and get a paycheck

    > regularly
    > > during that time frame. Most people would call a week where you don't go
    > > into work and do recieve a check a paid vacaion.

    >
    > "Most people" may not be aware of teachers' salary arrangements. But I

    have
    > a strong suspicion that, if you told "most people" that they would be paid
    > for only the number of days they work, and their "paid vacation" would add
    > no money to their paychecks, but would still be called "paid vacation"
    > because they would continue to get paychecks for the days they did work,
    > they might not agree that they were getting paid holidays.



    Y'know, this whole thing about "paid vacations" is tarting to get almost
    comical...when I was a bank teller, I was paid for 52 weeks of work--i.e. 52
    X 5 =260 days. I got off for federal holidays (let's see, that was 8 the
    last time I looked), as well as two weeks vacation (10 days).

    So, I got paid for 260 days, and only worked for 248. *That* is having
    "paid vacation"....teachers work for 183 days, and get paid for 183 days.
    where is the "paid vacation" in that?


    Buny
     
  19. SumBuny

    SumBuny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > And once again - I'm not saying they don' t have legitimate gripes - just
    > that I don't think the work schedule is one of them (other than the no
    > bathroom break thing - that is tough).



    IIRC, this thread *started* as a cross-post from alt.support.attn-deficit on
    the subject of ADHD. Then, somewhere along the line a poster claimed that
    "teachers have it easy because they only work 6 hours and have long
    'vacations' over the summers". The response from actual teachers that this
    is not true was to be expected--because it is not true...

    Buny
     
  20. SumBuny

    SumBuny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    > >
    > > If I worked those "holiday breaks" (officially) my salary would be
    > > approximately $5000 more than it is per year.

    >
    > So if you don't work the holiday your check is the same but if you do it

    is
    > larger than normal. And you don't think this means it is a paid vacation
    > day?



    ????

    When I was a bank teller, I worked 8 hour days, 5 days a week. If I worked
    on Saturday, I got paid more for that day.

    So, are you saying that for those working 5 day workweeks, Saturdays are
    paid vacation days?


    Buny
     
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