50 Conditions That Mimic "ADHD"

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Theta, Sep 20, 2003.

  1. B-Ob1

    B-Ob1 Guest

    see below

    SumBuny wrote:

    > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >
    > > "Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:p[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > If I worked those "holiday breaks" (officially) my salary would be
    > > > approximately $5000 more than it is per year.

    > >
    > > So if you don't work the holiday your check is the same but if you do it

    > is
    > > larger than normal. And you don't think this means it is a paid vacation
    > > day?

    >
    > ????
    >
    > When I was a bank teller, I worked 8 hour days, 5 days a week. If I worked
    > on Saturday, I got paid more for that day.
    >
    > So, are you saying that for those working 5 day workweeks, Saturdays are
    > paid vacation days?
    >
    > Buny


    WHUT in the consarned heyull does this have to dew with HEYULTH??? B-0b1
     


  2. JZAH

    JZAH Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 15:32:27 GMT, [email protected] (Alberto
    Moreira) wrote:

    >Said JZAH <[email protected]> :
    >
    >>I didn't say yours was either. I was referring to Alberto's posts.
    >>I'm only wishing for a discussion, rather than an attack. I don't
    >>think it's an impossible dream, however improbable it may be. The
    >>entire Arab world or the Muslim faith should not be the subject of
    >>whatever someone writes in reply when neither the entire Arab world or
    >>the Muslim faith have anything at all o do with the thread.
    >>Otherwise, the poster is attacking millions of diverse peoples and
    >>calling into question my right to comment on whatever it is.

    >
    >Alberto couldn't care less what faith you belong to - to him, your
    >faith's no better than anyone else's.


    Alberto does indeed care what faith he thinks the Arab belongs to,
    since he took the Arab's discussion about early America & made it into
    a discussion about Arabs & Islam. There is nothing whatsoever in what
    the Arab wrote that related to Islam or to all things Arab.

    >Alberto attacks ATTITUDE, especially the attitude issues that result from
    >some posts he has read.


    Alberto doesn't grasp the meaning of the Arab's post. If he did, he
    would not have written a totally irrelevant bigot's screed against
    Arab people & Islam.

    >Furthermore, Alberto firmly believes in separating religion from a lot
    >of things, not just only politics. So, the moment you separate
    >yourself because of your religion, you may be attracting Alberto's
    >objections - and he doesn't care if you're part of Islam, or Jewish,
    >or Protestant, or even Catholic as Alberto is.


    Alberto needs an eye examination. At no time did the Arab refer to
    religion or to Islam. This particular Arab is not even a Muslim, much
    less a Muslim inclined to educate Alberto about Islam.

    >Point being: to Alberto, the word "Zionist" draws from him the same
    >reaction the world "Hitler" does: he invokes Godwyn's law.


    Alberto needs an education, too. Zionism is not a religion. It is a
    complex political movement that has strong historical & cultural ties
    with German national socialism & western colonialism. That Alberto is
    unable to distinguish between Judaism and Zionism isn't surprising,
    though. There are lots of Jews who don't know there's a difference,
    either, & lsome who don't want anyone to think there is a difference..

    >Want to debate with Alberto ? If so, you can start by stop hiding
    >behind your religion or your ethnicity.


    The Arab does not see any value in debating Alberto when he either has
    not understood what he is replying to, or just wants an excuse to vent
    his anti-Arab biases.

    >The things that Alberto cares
    >for far transcend religion or ethnicity, so, hide behind either at
    >your own risk. I couldn't care less if you're an Arab, or if you're a
    >Moslem, in fact, I don't give a jota about your faith. But I do care
    >when I see faith interfering with common sense, and again, I'll point
    >those out whenever I see them - and I don't care which religion I'm
    >talking about.


    Alberto needs to read some books that aren't for coloring in & *then*
    get back to the Arab on these weighty topics.

    JZAH
     
  3. JZAH

    JZAH Guest

    On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 16:29:38 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> For those who reject that argument (on whatever grounds), I offer the
    >> following which I consider conclusive: There have been occasions when
    >> I and my colleagues HAVE worked during a vacation or holiday period.
    >> We were ALWAYS paid a per diem for that work. Therefore, CLEARLY, the
    >> district does not consider vacation or holidays as being "paid".
    >> Since THEY are the employer, and since THEY have a vested interest in
    >> considering these as "paid vacations" and DO NOT, then CLEARLY they
    >> ARE NOT "paid vacations".
    >>
    >> In the face of both arguments, anyone claiming we have "paid
    >> vacations" is either illogical, unable to read, or purposefully dense.

    >
    >Way to keep an open mind. Whatever, if you are going to declare that anyone
    >who dares disagree with you must have something wrong with them then there
    >is no point. it is one thing to have a firm opinion. Maintaining that it is
    >impossible for you to be wrong is a different matter (and there is a word
    >for it).
    >
    >The sad part is that you don't see the obvious flaw in the logic above.


    Declaring that there is something wrong with your opponent's brain is
    a longstanding debate tactic around here. So don't fight tradition.
    But aside from that, I think it's only fair to warn you that you have
    been contradicted by much reasonable and quantifiable evidence. If
    you don't concede on this point, don't be surprised if nobody has much
    regard for any other stands you take.

    JZAH
     
  4. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    > That's like saying that all teachers should be willing to work with
    > parents. They should be, but we all know that they don't.
    > I've interviewed primary care docs in the last 3 years since I started
    > seeing a specialist on a regular basis that tell me they aren't
    > interested in what my specialist has to say nor do they care. I hang up
    > the phone at that point and don't even bother to make an appointment.
    > This may be some of the problem with my finding a new primary care
    > doctor, but I don't think so. This hasn't been a majority.


    I think you are better off without those guys.
     
  5. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "SumBuny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > What about those who do not choose to have their 183 days' paychecks
    > distributed over 365 days? IIRC, the claim was that they got the summers

    as
    > "paid vacations" because they received a check...what happens to those who
    > do not?


    I've tuned into and out of this thread a few times so maybe someone else
    said that. I have made a point of not including the summer layoff.
     
  6. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > My last paycheck in December and 1st paycheck in January are both for 1
    > week, not two, because of the two week Winter Break. Similarly, there is a
    > paycheck in the spring which is for 1 week due to Spring break. So, no,
    > those are NOT paid holidays.


    Then in your case I agree.
     
  7. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "SumBuny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > And once again - I'm not saying they don' t have legitimate gripes -

    just
    > > that I don't think the work schedule is one of them (other than the no
    > > bathroom break thing - that is tough).

    >
    >
    > IIRC, this thread *started* as a cross-post from alt.support.attn-deficit

    on
    > the subject of ADHD. Then, somewhere along the line a poster claimed that
    > "teachers have it easy because they only work 6 hours and have long
    > 'vacations' over the summers". The response from actual teachers that

    this
    > is not true was to be expected--because it is not true...


    I don't think it is true either. I didn't make that claim.
     
  8. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "JZAH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Declaring that there is something wrong with your opponent's brain is
    > a longstanding debate tactic around here. So don't fight tradition.


    Doesn't say much for the level of discourse of the group. In most circles it
    is a tactic taken by those on the losing end.


    > But aside from that, I think it's only fair to warn you that you have
    > been contradicted by much reasonable and quantifiable evidence.


    Nah. Several people (but not all) have expressed contrary opinions but I
    think it is one of those things that can't really be proved.


    > If
    > you don't concede on this point, don't be surprised if nobody has much
    > regard for any other stands you take.


    Why ask them to change now?
     
  9. teachrmama

    teachrmama Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > "JZAH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > Declaring that there is something wrong with your opponent's brain is
    > > a longstanding debate tactic around here. So don't fight tradition.

    >
    > Doesn't say much for the level of discourse of the group. In most circles

    it
    > is a tactic taken by those on the losing end.
    >
    >
    > > But aside from that, I think it's only fair to warn you that you have
    > > been contradicted by much reasonable and quantifiable evidence.

    >
    > Nah. Several people (but not all) have expressed contrary opinions but I
    > think it is one of those things that can't really be proved.


    Actually, it has been thoroughly proved. You just choose to believe what
    you want to believe. The exact wording of at least one contract has been
    presented to you. Evidence that days outside of the specifically identified
    days are paid as extra days, even though they fall during your "paid
    holiday" period has been presented to you. The fact that a day missed from
    work is docked as 1/183 rather than 1/194 (which would include holidays in
    the annual total) has been presented. But you stubbornly insist that your
    take on the issue is the correct one, and that all of us who are actually a
    part of the system and negotiate for our contracts don't have a clue. I,
    for one, know the facts about the contract I sign. I believe that would
    leave you as the one with an opinion.
    >
    >
    > > If
    > > you don't concede on this point, don't be surprised if nobody has much
    > > regard for any other stands you take.

    >
    > Why ask them to change now?
    >
    >
     
  10. Seveigny

    Seveigny Guest

    "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > > Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held

    > > responsible
    > > > for what happens when you're not there.

    > >
    > > What?
    > >
    > > Medicine (including nursing and pharmacy) Wrong. Nurses are not held

    accountable for what happens on their shift when they are not there.
    Doctors are not held accountable for what happens on their shift when they
    are not there.

    > > Law

    True and untrue . When my husband is on vacation, another lawyer makes his
    apperances. He is responsible for his paperwork.

    > > Engineering

    Don't know enough about the profession.
    > > Accounting


    Nonsense. My father was a CPA. He had his accounts. He got them in order
    before he left for vacation and expected the junior accountants to put out
    fires while he was gone.

    > > What profession can't be?
    > >

    > Do you have to find your substitute, write the plans, create the

    materials,
    > and be tested on what the patients do when you're not there? If you have a
    > substitute doctor or lawyer, can the regular one be sued for malpractice

    or
    > disbarred? A classroom teacher is held accountable for their student's
    > performance, regardless of whether the teacher is physically present or

    not.
    Excellent questions!
    ~Cate

    --
    "Those that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
    Benjamin Franklin
     
  11. CBI

    CBI Guest

    "Seveigny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > > Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held
    > > > responsible
    > > > > for what happens when you're not there.
    > > >
    > > > What?
    > > >
    > > > Medicine (including nursing and pharmacy) Wrong. Nurses are not held

    > accountable for what happens on their shift when they are not there.
    > Doctors are not held accountable for what happens on their shift when they
    > are not there.


    Wrong. I don't even know where to begin on this one. There are many ways
    that a doctor can be held responsible for things that happen when he is not
    there.



    > > > Accounting

    >
    > Nonsense. My father was a CPA. He had his accounts. He got them in order
    > before he left for vacation and expected the junior accountants to put out
    > fires while he was gone.


    And if they do not do an adequate job the main accountant will be held
    responsible for not putting things in order well enough and finding adequate
    coverage.


    >
    > > > What profession can't be?
    > > >

    > > Do you have to find your substitute, write the plans, create the

    > materials,
    > > and be tested on what the patients do when you're not there?


    Yes. Commonly docs that work shifts are expected to find replacements when
    they are sick. Docs in private practice often hire "Locum Tenens"
    substitutes to take their place and the doc is responsible for what his
    replacement does and is expected to know what happened while he was gone.


    > If you have a
    > > substitute doctor or lawyer, can the regular one be sued for malpractice

    > or
    > > disbarred?


    Disbarred? - I don't know. He certainly can lose standing and clients over
    what his replacement does.

    Malpractice? - Yes.

    --
    00doc
     
  12. Seveigny

    Seveigny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > My last paycheck in December and 1st paycheck in January are both for 1
    > > week, not two, because of the two week Winter Break. Similarly, there is

    a
    > > paycheck in the spring which is for 1 week due to Spring break. So, no,
    > > those are NOT paid holidays.

    >
    > Then in your case I agree.


    Well then, you'll have to agree in all of the cases. All teachers are paid
    in the same manner.
    ~Cate
     
  13. Joni Rathbun

    Joni Rathbun Guest

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2003, Seveigny wrote:

    >
    > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > > My last paycheck in December and 1st paycheck in January are both for 1
    > > > week, not two, because of the two week Winter Break. Similarly, there is

    > a
    > > > paycheck in the spring which is for 1 week due to Spring break. So, no,
    > > > those are NOT paid holidays.

    > >
    > > Then in your case I agree.

    >
    > Well then, you'll have to agree in all of the cases. All teachers are paid
    > in the same manner.
    > ~Cate


    I even receive my last paycheck in December -- FOR DECEMBER -- BEFORE
    Winter Break begins. I receive no check at all from those two weeks.
    I wait an ADDITIONAL two weeks for the next check because it only
    covers the first two weeks in January.

    It was the same in my previous district. My December check came
    before Winter Break ... so I went an additional two weeks without a
    check.
     
  14. Seveigny

    Seveigny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > "Seveigny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > >
    > > > > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > >
    > > > > > Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held
    > > > > responsible
    > > > > > for what happens when you're not there.
    > > > >
    > > > > What?
    > > > >
    > > > > Medicine (including nursing and pharmacy) Wrong. Nurses are not

    held
    > > accountable for what happens on their shift when they are not there.
    > > Doctors are not held accountable for what happens on their shift when

    they
    > > are not there.

    >
    > Wrong. I don't even know where to begin on this one. There are many ways
    > that a doctor can be held responsible for things that happen when he is

    not
    > there.


    Okay, let's leave doctors out the question. How about nurses?

    >
    >
    > > > > Accounting

    > >
    > > Nonsense. My father was a CPA. He had his accounts. He got them in

    order
    > > before he left for vacation and expected the junior accountants to put

    out
    > > fires while he was gone.

    >
    > And if they do not do an adequate job the main accountant will be held
    > responsible for not putting things in order well enough and finding

    adequate
    > coverage.


    Incorrect. Most accountants work for accounting firms. The firm hires the
    junior accountants and places them in support positions for senior
    accountants. If the junior accountants screw up, they are fired or
    disciplined. The senior accountant fixes the problem and soothes the
    client's feelings. Now, most accounting firms will not allow their
    personnel to take vacation during tax season, January through April 15th.
    The rest of the year they are able to take as much time as they have
    accrued.

    > > > > What profession can't be?
    > > > >
    > > > Do you have to find your substitute, write the plans, create the

    > > materials,
    > > > and be tested on what the patients do when you're not there?

    >
    > Yes. Commonly docs that work shifts are expected to find replacements when
    > they are sick. Docs in private practice often hire "Locum Tenens"
    > substitutes to take their place and the doc is responsible for what his
    > replacement does and is expected to know what happened while he was gone.


    That wasn't the question. Donna asked if you, as an engineer, have to find a
    substitute, write plans for your substitute to follow, create materials for
    them to use and be tested on what the client does when you're not there.

    > > If you have a
    > > > substitute doctor or lawyer, can the regular one be sued for

    malpractice
    > > or
    > > > disbarred?

    >
    > Disbarred? - I don't know. He certainly can lose standing and clients over
    > what his replacement does.

    No, if a subsitute lawyer screws up, he is sued for malpractice.

    > Malpractice? - Yes.


    How can Doctor X be sued for malpractice if Doctor Z takes out the wrong
    kidney?
    Cate

    --
    "Those that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
    Benjamin Franklin
     
  15. Seveigny

    Seveigny Guest

    "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > "Seveigny" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > >
    > > > > "Donna Metler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]
    > > > >
    > > > > > Teaching is the only profession I know of where you can be held
    > > > > responsible
    > > > > > for what happens when you're not there.
    > > > >
    > > > > What?
    > > > >
    > > > > Medicine (including nursing and pharmacy) Wrong. Nurses are not

    held
    > > accountable for what happens on their shift when they are not there.
    > > Doctors are not held accountable for what happens on their shift when

    they
    > > are not there.

    >
    > Wrong. I don't even know where to begin on this one. There are many ways
    > that a doctor can be held responsible for things that happen when he is

    not
    > there.


    Okay, choose one way that a doctor can be held responsible for things that
    happen when he is not there. Just to make it easy for you, eliminate sole
    practioners.

    `Cate
    --
    "Those that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety."
    Benjamin Franklin
     
  16. On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 16:29:38 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> For those who reject that argument (on whatever grounds), I offer the
    >> following which I consider conclusive: There have been occasions when
    >> I and my colleagues HAVE worked during a vacation or holiday period.
    >> We were ALWAYS paid a per diem for that work. Therefore, CLEARLY, the
    >> district does not consider vacation or holidays as being "paid".
    >> Since THEY are the employer, and since THEY have a vested interest in
    >> considering these as "paid vacations" and DO NOT, then CLEARLY they
    >> ARE NOT "paid vacations".
    >>
    >> In the face of both arguments, anyone claiming we have "paid
    >> vacations" is either illogical, unable to read, or purposefully dense.

    >
    >Way to keep an open mind.


    I have an open mind. What I do NOT do, however, is to play with
    words. If you can refute the argument(s) above, feel free to do so.
    I, frankly, cannot see any way to do so.

    >Whatever, if you are going to declare that anyone
    >who dares disagree with you must have something wrong with them then there
    >is no point. it is one thing to have a firm opinion. Maintaining that it is
    >impossible for you to be wrong is a different matter (and there is a word
    >for it).
    >
    >The sad part is that you don't see the obvious flaw in the logic above.


    So obvious you failed to post it?
     
  17. On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 16:31:58 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Joni Rathbun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:p[email protected]
    >>
    >> If I worked those "holiday breaks" (officially) my salary would be
    >> approximately $5000 more than it is per year.

    >
    >So if you don't work the holiday your check is the same but if you do it is
    >larger than normal. And you don't think this means it is a paid vacation
    >day?


    Clearly it is not. The argument is equivilent to stating that my
    check is the same if I don't work weekends, but would be more if I did
    work on those days as well. If it is already "paid" then no one would
    pay you AGAIN to work that day.
     
  18. On Sun, 19 Oct 2003 16:15:19 GMT, "CBI" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >message news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>
    >> CBI wrote:
    >> > "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote

    >in
    >> > message news:[email protected]
    >> >
    >> >>As a doctor, you also get paid a hell of a lot more than I do.
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > How is that relevant to whether you call spring break a paid vacation or
    >> > not?

    >> Its very relevant. Doctors really DO get paid vacations.

    >
    >Huh? I get no baseline salary and am completely paid on productivity. If I
    >take a day off I am paid nothing. THAT is not getting a paid vacation.


    It follows, then, that NOT taking that day off results in greater pay.
    Sounds exactly like what I noted about teachers, that you somehow
    concluded meant that it WAS a paid vacation. Not very consistent, are
    you?!
     
  19. DiChiera

    DiChiera Guest

    "Magi D. Shepley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I actually have a decent insurance plan. One of the benefits of working
    > for a hospital: my insurance plan is way better here and cheaper than
    > anything I've ever had before. The problem is getting established as a
    > "new patient". Most doctors only see new patients on certain days, some
    > only a couple of times a month. It is very hard to get a new general
    > physician... and I need one that is willing to work with a specialist
    > as well.
    >
    > Magi
    >


    One of the benefits of working for a hospital years ago, was I got to
    know the doctors and their reputations. Broke bread with them in the
    cafeteria, played volleyball with the adult leagues, went with friends
    to Woodstock Country Club in Vermont as husbands played golf ....

    I'm running away with myself here ... my point being, if you work at
    the hospital, I'd think you could ask your boss, who they'd go to and
    if there is anyway to circumvent the usual waiting period? I'm not
    sure if they are still doing this ... but we were given professional
    courtesy as employees of the hospital ... came in very handy,
    especially with any balances after insurances.

    Leah aka
     
  20. DiChiera

    DiChiera Guest

    nknisley <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > DeChiera wrote:
    >

    <<<<<<< trying to keep my stroke quota down >>>>>>
    > >
    > >
    > > You might want to look into an insurance that covers ER visits. We have
    > > military Tricare, it seems to pay more and faster on emergency visits for my
    > > daughters accidents than any of the other services. As I am one of those
    > > impatient people, who like to have medical issues address as soon as
    > > possible vs. an assigned appointment ... ER is fine with me. I just bring a
    > > good book, something for the girls to do while waiting and snacks to nibble
    > > on. ER doctors have always be quite kind and helpful and will set up any
    > > followup needed in a timely manner.
    > >

    >
    > I don't know what hospital you go to with your daughters, but...


    University of Michigan //// St Joseph Mercy depending on problem ...


    >
    > Recently, early one evening, a member of my family was in an accident.
    > We tried to reach his regular doctors, but couldn't. Since he was in
    > severe pain, and we thought he might have a broken or dislocated bone,
    > we went to the ER, located on the fringes of a large urban city.
    >
    > We got to the ER around 7 PM. He was triaged around 7:30 and put on the
    > "fast track" for "urgent care." At 8:30, the hospital got his insurance
    > information and paperwork completed. He sat in pain in the "urgent care"
    > waiting area until he saw the "urgent care" doctor at 11 PM. After his
    > exam and x-rays, he was discharged at 1 AM with prescriptions for pain
    > medication.
    >
    > Because he was still in terrible pain, we then had to drive to the only
    > all-night pharmacy in the area to have the prescriptions filled. He
    > finally got home at 2 AM and was able to take his medication and get
    > some relief for the pain he'd been enduring for over 7 hours.
    >
    > I sure would hate to be a patient not on the "fast track" for "urgent care"!


    So far, two daughters have ended up with injuries from sports. But
    usually, we go on the advise of my daughters mothers advise (she's a
    doctor), so when the situation warants quick attention the wait is
    usually not longer than what is needed to be accomplish. I did post
    elsewhere that I do bring a book (helps calm my nerves also) and
    activities for the child to do while waiting.

    >
    > Before I'd go to an ER myself, I'd *really* have to be in an emergency
    > situation--like something that might kill me if I couldn't wait until my
    > regular doctor's office opened for business. And, maybe, not even then.
    > (Joking)


    >
    > Oh, and as for myself, sitting for all those hours in the waiting room:
    > I don't remember being so bored in ages as I was that night. For the
    > first time in memory, I read that day's entire newspaper. I also played
    > games on my PDA, watched Jay Leno and Conan O'Brien on the waiting room
    > TV, and had started doing the paper's crossword puzzles before we were
    > able to leave.
    >


    Send hubby instead ... <grin>


    > You know, sometimes I do wish my life was less, um, exciting, but, the
    > hours of boredom that evening was excruciating.



    I can relate ....

    >
    >
    > Nancy
    > Unique, like everyone else
     
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