50!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Claire Petersky, Apr 22, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top speed
    of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.

    What made the difference:

    Husband spurred me to crank it much more at the top quarter of the hill, where it is relatively
    flat, so by the time I got to the steep part, I was already in the tuck;

    Warmer weather meant that I wasn't wearing a coat;

    Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);

    Fully-inflated tires and that performance tune-up I got last week meant the bike was in top
    condition;

    and

    No frickin' motor vehicle traffic in my way! How dare they want to go the posted speed limit of 35
    mph down that lovely hill?

    I did the happy dance on the bike all the way sailing up to the light. Us middle aged ladies have to
    get our thrills however we can.

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky ([email protected])

    Home of the meditative cyclist: http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

    Singing with you at: http://www.tiferet.net/

    Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
     
    Tags:


  2. Waxxer

    Waxxer Guest

    You crazy lady!! Anything over 35 and you should be wearing leather. It does feel great though--if
    you have the nerve and there are no driveways on the road.

    Have fun!!!

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top speed
    > of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.
    >
    > What made the difference:
    >
    > Husband spurred me to crank it much more at the top quarter of the hill, where it is relatively
    > flat, so by the time I got to the steep part, I was already in the tuck;
    >
    > Warmer weather meant that I wasn't wearing a coat;
    >
    > Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);
    >
    > Fully-inflated tires and that performance tune-up I got last week meant the bike was in top
    > condition;
    >
    > and
    >
    > No frickin' motor vehicle traffic in my way! How dare they want to go the posted speed limit of 35
    > mph down that lovely hill?
    >
    > I did the happy dance on the bike all the way sailing up to the light. Us middle aged ladies have
    > to get our thrills however we can.
    >
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    >
    >
    > Claire Petersky ([email protected])
    >
    > Home of the meditative cyclist: http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    >
    > Singing with you at: http://www.tiferet.net/
    >
    > Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
     
  3. Claire Petersky wrote:
    >
    > Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);
    >

    THAT'S what I've been leaving out!

    Thanks, Claire!
     
  4. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >[email protected] (Claire Petersky)

    wrote in part:

    >For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top speed
    >of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.

    It's great, isn't it? :) The incredible rush of wind tearing at you.... The feeling that you are
    earthbound only by the two tiny contact patches of your tires.... Is there anything better than pure
    speed? Congratulations from a fellow adrenaline junkie.

    Regards, Bob Hunt
     
  5. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Claire Petersky wrote:

    > For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top speed
    > of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.
    >
    > What made the difference:
    >
    > Husband spurred me to crank it much more at the top quarter of the hill, where it is relatively
    > flat, so by the time I got to the steep part, I was already in the tuck;
    >
    > Warmer weather meant that I wasn't wearing a coat;
    >
    > Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);
    >
    > Fully-inflated tires and that performance tune-up I got last week meant the bike was in top
    > condition;
    >
    > and
    >
    > No frickin' motor vehicle traffic in my way! How dare they want to go the posted speed limit of 35
    > mph down that lovely hill?
    >
    > I did the happy dance on the bike all the way sailing up to the light. Us middle aged ladies have
    > to get our thrills however we can.
    >
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    > Claire Petersky ([email protected])
    >
    > Home of the meditative cyclist: http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    >
    > Singing with you at: http://www.tiferet.net/
    >
    > Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky

    Yeeeeeeooooooowwww!!! Keep your eyes open Claire! Bernie
     
  6. [email protected] (Claire Petersky) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top speed
    > of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.
    >

    Talk about misleading subjects. MY first thought was "she doesn't LOOK 50." I want my money back.

    > What made the difference:
    >

    For me, the difference is being Canadian. "50?" C'est rien (shrug).

    And you thought there was some OTHER benefit to the metric system?

    >
    > Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);
    >

    Probably should ask this in r.b.t., but how do I braid 1/2" long hair into pigtails? Do I need to
    grow it out? Would 3/4" do?

    > > No frickin' motor vehicle traffic in my way!
    > How dare they want to go the posted speed limit of 35 mph down that lovely hill?
    >

    My experence is that cars will still pass me if I'm doing 60 kph in a 50 kph zone. It's the
    distortion in the time-space continuum generated when a bicycle (any bicycle) brushes past the
    molecules in the air.

    Mind you, It is fun to watch the cop at the bottom of the hill pull them over for speeding :)

    tfn
     
  7. Claire Petersky wrote:

    >Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);
    >
    >
    >

    Next time have it in a pony tail for an even more aero effect, I think you could squeeze out an
    extra mph. I love going fast down hills, being a fatty means I can really fly. However it is a bit
    scary when you slow down and ponder about if you came off going full noise.

    --
    Cheers Damian Harvey

    This space reserved for standard disclaimer, witty quote, plug for own business in caps and large,
    bad ASCII art.
     
  8. Austinboston

    Austinboston Guest

    Claire Petersky wrote:
    > For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top speed
    > of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.
    >

    You're a better man...uh...person than I. We have some great hills around here, but I chicken out at
    about 35 mph.

    Austin
     
  9. Archer

    Archer Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Claire Petersky wrote:
    > > For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top
    > > speed of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.
    > >
    >
    > You're a better man...uh...person than I. We have some great hills around here, but I chicken out
    > at about 35 mph.

    I wish we had some good hills; I have to pedal hard, maxing out my cadence in top gear, to get to 35
    before I run out of hill.

    --
    David Kerber An optimist says "Good morning, Lord." While a pessimist says "Good Lord,
    it's morning".

    Remove the ns_ from the address before e-mailing.
     
  10. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Claire Petersky) writes:

    > Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);

    So, you went with pigtails, eh? I think that's a good choice. I see lots of women with them, and it
    works for them -- more the Active Woman look than the Laura Engels Effect they might initially fear
    when deciding to go with pigtails. I imagine pigtails make helmet straps, rain and wind easier to
    deal with than poofy hair. Maybe they're another adaptation to the cycling lifestyle that can be
    regarded as a badge. A good combination of functionality and appearance.

    ...

    > and
    >
    > No frickin' motor vehicle traffic in my way! How dare they want to go the posted speed limit of 35
    > mph down that lovely hill?

    A speeding ticket might make an interesting wall-hanger/ conversation piece :)

    Way to go, Claire. You rock!

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  11. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, archer <[email protected]_hotmail.com> writes:

    > I wish we had some good hills; I have to pedal hard, maxing out my cadence in top gear, to get to
    > 35 before I run out of hill.

    I *do* have good hills and humps nearby, and I still have to work hard to get up to 30 mph (50
    km/h). My riser bar-equipped MTB, with me on it, is just too parachute-like. Sometimes, stiff
    headwind gusts have stopped me in my tracks, and then blown me backwards, back up the hill. Okay,
    not really. I just felt like telling a tall tale :)

    I get to ride /up/ the hills, anyway. That can be fun, too. Sometimes, not.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  12. Hunrobe wrote:

    > >[email protected] (Claire Petersky)
    >
    > wrote in part:
    >
    > >For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top
    > >speed of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.
    >
    > It's great, isn't it? :) The incredible rush of wind tearing at you.... The feeling that you are
    > earthbound only by the two tiny contact patches of your tires.... Is there anything better than
    > pure speed?

    Couldn't say myself. Interests me very little.

    My personal best is 39 mph on an 80 pound bike coming down an eastern slope of a Montana Rocky
    Mountain pass. It could probably have been 60 if I'd let loose.

    But quite frankly, after all the miles I've ridden over the years, I still get nervous, even
    on roads I know intimately well, at speeds over roughly 30 mph. The bike just doesn't feel
    secure enough; what if there's a patch of sand up ahead; a pothole; a dog or deer bolting out
    into the road?

    Obviously, I'm not NASCAR material, and TdF runs in the Alpes are out for me, and even when not
    touring, I still tend to regard a steep downhill run as a "waste", much prefering a gradual decline
    for as many miles as possible.

    On tour of course, through hilly/mountainous terrain, a sudden steep downhill means you're quickly
    losing all that altitude gain you've been working at all day, and now, closer to the pass, you'll
    have to make it all up and more, to get through the pass.

    The psychology of downhills!

    SMH
     
  13. David Storm

    David Storm Guest

    Its a hoot isn't it? I set my record too at 50+ going down Carson Pass in Calif. Could have gone
    faster but a darned Porsche was in my way.. ...and I spooked out. The tandem on our ride that day
    exceeded 60 down the pass. I've heard that the tandem racers in Death Valley exceed 70 AT NIGHT
    descending into Panamint valley.

    Once was enough...not going to press my luck.

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top speed
    > of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.
    >
    > What made the difference:
    >
    > Husband spurred me to crank it much more at the top quarter of the hill, where it is relatively
    > flat, so by the time I got to the steep part, I was already in the tuck;
    >
    > Warmer weather meant that I wasn't wearing a coat;
    >
    > Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);
    >
    > Fully-inflated tires and that performance tune-up I got last week meant the bike was in top
    > condition;
    >
    > and
    >
    > No frickin' motor vehicle traffic in my way! How dare they want to go the posted speed limit of 35
    > mph down that lovely hill?
    >
    > I did the happy dance on the bike all the way sailing up to the light. Us middle aged ladies have
    > to get our thrills however we can.
    >
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    >
    >
    > Claire Petersky ([email protected])
    >
    > Home of the meditative cyclist: http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    >
    > Singing with you at: http://www.tiferet.net/
    >
    > Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
     
  14. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >Damian Harvey [email protected]

    wrote in part:

    >However it is a bit scary when you slow down and ponder about if you came off going full noise.

    That weak feeling in your knees after a really *fast* descent is just the end of the adrenaline
    rush. Disregard it. If you mean you get a nasty mental image of the result of a crash at speed,
    that's even easier to deal with. Just don't think about it. You're immortal anyway so it won't
    happen to you, right? :)

    Regards, Bob Hunt
     
  15. Austinboston

    Austinboston Guest

    Tom Keats wrote:

    > [email protected] (Claire Petersky) writes:
    >
    > >
    > > No frickin' motor vehicle traffic in my way! How dare they want to go the posted speed limit of
    > > 35 mph down that lovely hill?
    >
    > A speeding ticket might make an interesting wall-hanger/ conversation piece :)
    >

    If I got a speeding ticket on my bike, I'd appeal it just so that I could go to court and plead
    guilty of speeding on my bicycle and have a bunch of people hear just how fast I was going.

    Then I'd have to work in to the next 20 or so conversations about how I was found guilty of speeding
    on my bicycle.

    Probably would be a waste of effort, because most would not be cyclists and therefore not
    appreaciate the accomplishment!

    I doubt my wife would let me hang the ticket up next to the family portrait.

    Austin
     
  16. I'm a chicken and don't really attempt any speed records, although here in San Diego we have lots of
    hill east of town where speeds like that can be achieved. On my weekend training rides there a a
    couple hills where I regularly hit speeds in the 40s.

    Then I come home and watch TV commercials about thrill rides at Magic Mountain and other such
    places. I think to myself "these people pay for what I go through several times a week".

    Sort of puts our lives as cyclists into perspective.

    Tom

    [email protected] (Claire Petersky) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > For the first time on the commute into work this morning -- I had a personal best of the top speed
    > of 50+ mph coming down Kamber Road.
    >
    > What made the difference:
    >
    > Husband spurred me to crank it much more at the top quarter of the hill, where it is relatively
    > flat, so by the time I got to the steep part, I was already in the tuck;
    >
    > Warmer weather meant that I wasn't wearing a coat;
    >
    > Pigtails meant my hair was more aerodynamic (ok, maybe that doesn't make a difference...);
    >
    > Fully-inflated tires and that performance tune-up I got last week meant the bike was in top
    > condition;
    >
    > and
    >
    > No frickin' motor vehicle traffic in my way! How dare they want to go the posted speed limit of 35
    > mph down that lovely hill?
    >
    > I did the happy dance on the bike all the way sailing up to the light. Us middle aged ladies have
    > to get our thrills however we can.
    >
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    >
    >
    > Claire Petersky ([email protected])
    >
    > Home of the meditative cyclist: http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    >
    > Singing with you at: http://www.tiferet.net/
    >
    > Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
     
  17. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > In article <[email protected]>, archer <[email protected]_hotmail.com> writes:
    >
    > > I wish we had some good hills; I have to pedal hard, maxing out my cadence in top gear, to get
    > > to 35 before I run out of hill.
    >
    > I *do* have good hills and humps nearby, and I still have to work hard to get up to 30 mph (50
    > km/h). My riser bar-equipped MTB, with me on it, is just too parachute-like. Sometimes, stiff
    > headwind gusts have stopped me in my tracks, and then blown me backwards, back up the hill. Okay,
    > not really. I just felt like telling a tall tale :)

    My old Schwinn LeTank isn't the fastest thing around, but it does ok for as weak a motor motor as it
    has <GGG>. It's certainly more aero than a MTB, and I always keep the tires pumped up to their 80
    psi max. I just wish I had a gear taller than 100". I'm looking around to see what I can get to
    retrofit to it, but my budget's pretty limited.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  18. Thomas Reynolds wrote:

    >I'm a chicken and don't really attempt any speed records, although here in San Diego we have lots
    >of hill east of town where speeds like that can be achieved. On my weekend training rides there a a
    >couple hills where I regularly hit speeds in the 40s.
    >
    >Then I come home and watch TV commercials about thrill rides at Magic Mountain and other such
    >places. I think to myself "these people pay for what I go through several times a week".
    >
    >Sort of puts our lives as cyclists into perspective.
    >
    >Tom
    >
    >
    Every single day on my mornig commute I break 60 kph. Not an especially large hill, I''m just fat. I
    passed a roadie there yesterday morning, after he passed me up the road further, he muttered an
    obviously impressed "Bloody Hell". My best was coming down from Eagle on the Hill (Adelaide cyclists
    will know it) at 83kph. Try doing that on a toy shop bike and you might get yourself killed. Of
    course going up that hill brings me back to about 10kph.

    --
    Cheers Damian Harvey

    This space reserved for standard disclaimer, witty quote, plug for own business in caps and large,
    bad ASCII art.
     
  19. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "David Storm" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Its a hoot isn't it? I set my record too at 50+ going down Carson Pass in Calif. Could have gone
    >faster but a darned Porsche was in my way.. ...and I spooked out. The tandem on our ride that day
    >exceeded 60 down the pass. I've heard that the tandem racers in Death Valley exceed 70 AT NIGHT
    >descending into Panamint valley.
    >
    >Once was enough...not going to press my luck.

    The first time I hit 50 was down a windy little country road falling down a mountain in Vermont. I
    decided to set a new land speed record (after struggling up the mother in a 42-23) and hunkered down
    on my old Cannondale (this was a LONG time ago), grasping the top tube with my knees and with my
    hands right next to the stem for that "ultimate tuck position".

    Thing is, I got to about 46mph (still accelerating nicely) when the front end started to shake. This
    coincided well with me catching the jeep going down the hill ahead of me. Oops. I gingerly slid my
    hands outward toward the brake hoods and made a quick grab for 'em (and luckily didn't miss - they
    were a little blurry).

    50.5mph has never felt THAT fast again!

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  20. Goimir

    Goimir Guest

    Stephen Harding wrote:

    > On tour of course, through hilly/mountainous terrain, a sudden steep downhill means you're quickly
    > losing all that altitude gain you've been working at all day, and now, closer to the pass, you'll
    > have to make it all up and more, to get through the pass.
    >
    >

    That's why you use the old truck driver's trick. Go down the hill as fast as you possibly can, to
    get momentum to carry you up the next one!
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...