62" limit bikebox on plane

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.rides archive' started by Jim F. Kemper, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be flying
    to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles, not ticketed straight through (different carriers). I'd
    like to take my 25" frame road bike along. Has anyone been able to meet the 62" limit for the sum of
    the dimensions of the box? No problem disassembling. Thought of boxing the wheels separately or
    carrying them on in a garment bag. I'll also be carrying a fullsize internal frame backpack. Just
    seems silly paying $60 - $75 twice on the way over for a bike that's worth about the same. Plan to
    leave the bike over there for future trips.

    Steve reply to group only
     
    Tags:


  2. .O0 0o.

    .O0 0o. Guest

    Why can't you buy a bike when you get to NZ? If it is worth $120-$150 I would just buy one there
    since you are going to leave it anyway. Or maybe you could check rates on having it shipped by a
    freight carrier (FedEx, UPS, etc.)

    "Jim F. Kemper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hBp%[email protected]...
    > Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be
    > flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles,
    not
    > ticketed straight through (different carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along.
    > Has anyone been able to meet the 62" limit for the sum of the dimensions of the box? No problem
    > disassembling. Thought of boxing the wheels separately or carrying them on in a garment bag.
    > I'll also be carrying a fullsize internal frame backpack. Just seems silly paying $60 - $75
    > twice on the way over for a bike that's worth about the same. Plan to leave the bike over there
    > for future trips.
    >
    > Steve reply to group only
     
  3. Jim F. Kemper wrote:

    >Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be
    >flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles, not ticketed straight through (different
    >carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along. Has anyone been able to meet the 62"
    >limit for the sum of the dimensions of the box? No problem disassembling. Thought of boxing the
    >wheels separately or carrying them on in a garment bag. I'll also be carrying a fullsize internal
    >frame backpack. Just seems silly paying $60 - $75 twice on the way over for a bike that's worth
    >about the same. Plan to leave the bike over there for future trips.
    >
    >Steve reply to group only
    >
    >
    What airline you flying on?

    Check here: http://www.ibike.org/encouragement/travel/bagregs.htm

    --
    *****************************
    Chuck Anderson • Boulder, CO http://www.CycleTourist.com Integrity is obvious. The lack of it
    is common.
    *****************************
     
  4. >Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be
    >flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles, not ticketed straight through (different
    >carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along. Has anyone been able to meet the 62"
    >limit for the sum of the dimensions of the box?

    I have flown to/from New Zealand with a large bicycle. While not 62", I have used the airline boxes,
    which allows for easy packing. For the most common US box size, this means remove pedals, turn
    handlebars, remove seat. Quantas has boxes that are shorter and fatter. This means to also remove
    the wheels and fenders.

    The international rates keep changing. However, in the most common international flight cases I've
    been able to do the following:
    * Check the bike through to the destination (nice if you can somehow have them do that even with two
    disjoint flights...less hassle in LA and potential cheaper fare).
    * Use an "international rule", where bicycle is one piece of luggage, so as long as only have two
    pieces of luggage bicycle is free.

    Looking through my journal notes more specifically:

    * Australia to NZ (Dec '01): bought bike box, not clear if I paid extra for the box.
    * NZ to India (Jan '02): Initially were going to charge me extra per kilo. Ticket agent took pity on
    my and let bike go for free.
    * US to Australia (May '01): Bike flies as piece of luggage. I have 3 pieces so pay $75.
    * Australia to US (Aug '01): Initially were going to charge me for Perth to Sydney leg of Perth ->
    SFO trip. Agreed to let bike fly for free.
    * US to Australia (Sept '01): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.
    * India to USA (Feb '02): Was told of large fee but waived as "special allowance".
    * US to Australia (Nov '99): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.
    * Australia to US (Dec '99): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.

    If you are really going to bring it down to 62", I'd probably think of trying to make it look like a
    painting or golf clubs or some other thing that flies for free :)...

    --mev, Mike Vermeulen
     
  5. ".o0 0o." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Why can't you buy a bike when you get to NZ? If it is worth $120-$150 I would just buy one there
    > since you are going to leave it anyway. Or maybe you could check rates on having it shipped by a
    > freight carrier (FedEx,
    UPS,
    > etc.)

    Buying there is a possibility. Have been looking at www.trademe.co.nz, like ebay, but I really need
    a 25" frame. Will keep looking.

    thanks, Steve
     
  6. "Chuck Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:z6v%[email protected]_s52...
    > Jim F. Kemper wrote:
    >
    > >Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be
    > >flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles,
    not
    > >ticketed straight through (different carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along.
    > >Has anyone been able to meet the 62" limit for
    the
    > >sum of the dimensions of the box? No problem disassembling. Thought of boxing the wheels
    > >separately or carrying them on in a garment bag. I'll also be carrying a fullsize internal frame
    > >backpack. Just seems silly paying $60 - $75 twice on the way over for a bike that's worth about
    > >the same. Plan to leave the bike over there for future trips.
    > >
    > >Steve reply to group only
    > >
    > >
    > What airline you flying on?
    >
    > Check here: http://www.ibike.org/encouragement/travel/bagregs.htm
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > *****************************
    > Chuck Anderson • Boulder, CO http://www.CycleTourist.com Integrity is obvious. The lack of it is
    > common.
    > *****************************

    Thanks for the site, Chuck. Delta to LAX, then Quantas from there, unfortunately not on the same
    ticket. Called Delta who told me about the 62" limit for free checked baggage.

    regards, Steve
     
  7. "Mike Vermeulen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be
    > >flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles,
    not
    > >ticketed straight through (different carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along.
    > >Has anyone been able to meet the 62" limit for
    the
    > >sum of the dimensions of the box?
    >
    > I have flown to/from New Zealand with a large bicycle. While not 62", I have used the airline
    > boxes, which allows for easy packing. For the most common US box size, this means remove pedals,
    > turn handlebars, remove seat. Quantas has boxes that are shorter and fatter. This means to also
    > remove the wheels and fenders.
    >
    > The international rates keep changing. However, in the most common international flight cases I've
    > been able to do the following:
    > * Check the bike through to the destination (nice if you can somehow have them do that even with
    > two disjoint flights...less hassle in LA and potential cheaper fare).
    > * Use an "international rule", where bicycle is one piece of luggage, so as long as only have two
    > pieces of luggage bicycle is free.
    >
    > Looking through my journal notes more specifically:
    >
    > * Australia to NZ (Dec '01): bought bike box, not clear if I paid extra for the box.
    > * NZ to India (Jan '02): Initially were going to charge me extra per kilo. Ticket agent took pity
    > on my and let bike go for free.
    > * US to Australia (May '01): Bike flies as piece of luggage. I have 3 pieces so pay $75.
    > * Australia to US (Aug '01): Initially were going to charge me for Perth to Sydney leg of Perth ->
    > SFO trip. Agreed to let bike fly for free.
    > * US to Australia (Sept '01): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.
    > * India to USA (Feb '02): Was told of large fee but waived as "special allowance".
    > * US to Australia (Nov '99): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.
    > * Australia to US (Dec '99): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.
    >
    > If you are really going to bring it down to 62", I'd probably think of trying to make it look like
    > a painting or golf clubs or some other thing that flies for free :)...
    >
    > --mev, Mike Vermeulen

    Bedaankt, Mike. If it's down to 62", they have to take it for free. Read about someone with a larger
    package that said it contained presentation materials. Five minutes later he was paged. They xrayed
    the box and asked him to come up with $75. Might just leave the bike behind for this short trip and
    plan better for a longer one next year.

    regards, Steve
     
  8. Ruth & Dave

    Ruth & Dave Guest

    If you do bring your bike- the agricultural airport guys here are real hot on clean. The New Zealand
    Trade and Exchange is another scource of second hand bikes.

    "Jim F. Kemper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:smB%[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mike Vermeulen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > >Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would
    appreciate
    > > >your input. I'll be flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles,
    > not
    > > >ticketed straight through (different carriers). I'd like to take my
    25"
    > > >frame road bike along. Has anyone been able to meet the 62" limit for
    > the
    > > >sum of the dimensions of the box?
    > >
    > > I have flown to/from New Zealand with a large bicycle. While not 62", I have used the airline
    > > boxes, which allows for easy packing. For the most common US box size, this means remove pedals,
    > > turn handlebars, remove seat. Quantas has boxes that are shorter and fatter. This means to also
    > > remove the wheels and fenders.
    > >
    > > The international rates keep changing. However, in the most common international flight cases
    > > I've been able to do the following:
    > > * Check the bike through to the destination (nice if you can somehow have them do that even with
    > > two disjoint flights...less hassle in LA and potential cheaper fare).
    > > * Use an "international rule", where bicycle is one piece of luggage, so as long as only have
    > > two pieces of luggage bicycle is free.
    > >
    > > Looking through my journal notes more specifically:
    > >
    > > * Australia to NZ (Dec '01): bought bike box, not clear if I paid extra for the box.
    > > * NZ to India (Jan '02): Initially were going to charge me extra per kilo. Ticket agent took
    > > pity on my and let bike go for free.
    > > * US to Australia (May '01): Bike flies as piece of luggage. I have 3 pieces so pay $75.
    > > * Australia to US (Aug '01): Initially were going to charge me for Perth to Sydney leg of Perth
    > > -> SFO trip. Agreed to let bike fly for free.
    > > * US to Australia (Sept '01): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.
    > > * India to USA (Feb '02): Was told of large fee but waived as "special allowance".
    > > * US to Australia (Nov '99): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.
    > > * Australia to US (Dec '99): Bike flies as one piece of luggage.
    > >
    > > If you are really going to bring it down to 62", I'd probably think of trying to make it look
    > > like a painting or golf clubs or some other thing that flies for free :)...
    > >
    > > --mev, Mike Vermeulen
    >
    > Bedaankt, Mike. If it's down to 62", they have to take it for free. Read about someone with a
    > larger package that said it contained presentation materials. Five minutes later he was paged.
    > They xrayed the box and
    asked
    > him to come up with $75. Might just leave the bike behind for this short trip and plan better for
    > a longer one next year.
    >
    > regards, Steve
     
  9. Jim F. Kemper wrote:
    > Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be
    > flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles, not ticketed straight through (different
    > carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along. Has anyone been able to meet the 62"
    > limit for the sum of the dimensions of the box? No problem disassembling.

    Thats good because I have a large frame (62cm) frame that fits into the bike box but requires
    removing the crank, and the racks, and the fenders...

    http://freeengineer.org/Fall2002BikeTrip/05_BikeInBox.jpg.

    peace

    CRM

    Thought of
    > boxing the wheels separately or carrying them on in a garment bag. I'll also be carrying a
    > fullsize internal frame backpack. Just seems silly paying $60 - $75 twice on the way over for a
    > bike that's worth about the same. Plan to leave the bike over there for future trips.
    >
    > Steve reply to group only
     
  10. "cashrefundman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:apJ%[email protected]...
    > Jim F. Kemper wrote:
    > > Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would
    appreciate
    > > your input. I'll be flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles,
    not
    > > ticketed straight through (different carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along.
    > > Has anyone been able to meet the 62" limit for
    the
    > > sum of the dimensions of the box? No problem disassembling.
    >
    > Thats good because I have a large frame (62cm) frame that fits into the bike box but requires
    > removing the crank, and the racks, and the
    fenders...
    >
    > http://freeengineer.org/Fall2002BikeTrip/05_BikeInBox.jpg.
    >
    > peace
    >
    > CRM
    >
    >
    >
    > Thought of
    > > boxing the wheels separately or carrying them on in a garment bag. I'll also be carrying a
    > > fullsize internal frame backpack. Just seems silly paying $60 - $75 twice on the way over for a
    > > bike that's worth about the same. Plan to leave the bike over there for future trips.
    > >
    > > Steve reply to group only

    Great pic! I see you removed the bottom bracket. Don't want the ends of the spindle poking through.
    I was going to remove the fork also.

    thanks, Steve
     
  11. "Ruth & Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > If you do bring your bike- the agricultural airport guys here are real hot on clean. The New
    > Zealand Trade and Exchange is another scource of second hand
    bikes.

    Great idea! I remember buying it on a previous visit. Just found their online version. Thanks!

    Steve
     
  12. Harry 026

    Harry 026 Guest

    In article <hBp%[email protected]>, "Jim F. Kemper"
    <[email protected]> writes:

    >Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be
    >flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles, not ticketed straight through (different
    >carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along. Has anyone been able to meet the 62"
    >limit for the sum of the dimensions of the box? No problem disassembling. Thought of boxing the
    >wheels separately or carrying them on in a garment bag. I'll also be carrying a fullsize internal
    >frame backpack. Just seems silly paying $60 - $75 twice on the way over for a bike that's worth
    >about the same. Plan to leave the bike over there for future trips.

    It's been my experience (several international flights) that they seem to ignore those dimensions.
    If they accept a bike, then they don't measure the box. I think they are more worried about people
    bringing big steamer trunks.

    I flew Qantus to NZ last year (from L.A.) and there was no trouble with the box. I'd gotten a small
    box that required taking off the front wheel. When coming back I managed to find a large box in
    Auckland which allowed me to merely remove the pedals and turn the handlebars. Qantus accepted it
    with no question, which was a relief since it made the assembly at LAX much easier.

    I'll be flying to Chile in a couple of weeks. I emailed LanChile about the bike, and they said "no
    problema". They were glad to accept bikes if they met some ridiculous sum-of-measurements
    requirement that no bike box could ever possibly meet (except perhaps a Bike Friday). But, having
    flown LanChile before, I expect no problema.

    Harry
     
  13. Steve wrote:

    > Great pic! I see you removed the bottom bracket. Don't want the ends of the spindle poking
    > through. I was going to remove the fork also.
    >

    No only the cranks.

    CRM
     
  14. Perry Butler

    Perry Butler Guest

    Steve,

    To meet the 62" requirement you need a folding bike or S & S couplers on your bike . Just the
    couplers alone are worth more than your bike.

    Occasionally an airline, expecially during the summer or if you're the last to check in, will refuse
    to allow an oversize box and you will have to scramble to get your bike shipped.

    For an explaination on the 62" requirement go to: http://www.sandsmachine.com/regs.htm

    Enjoy,

    Perry B

    "Jim F. Kemper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hBp%[email protected]...
    > Found some good info at www.gfonline.org/BikeAccess/ but would appreciate your input. I'll be
    > flying to New Zealand from Dallas via Los Angeles,
    not
    > ticketed straight through (different carriers). I'd like to take my 25" frame road bike along.
    > Has anyone been able to meet the 62" limit for the sum of the dimensions of the box? No problem
    > disassembling. Thought of boxing the wheels separately or carrying them on in a garment bag.
    > I'll also be carrying a fullsize internal frame backpack. Just seems silly paying $60 - $75
    > twice on the way over for a bike that's worth about the same. Plan to leave the bike over there
    > for future trips.
    >
    > Steve reply to group only
     
  15. "Perry Butler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Steve,
    >
    > To meet the 62" requirement you need a folding bike or S & S couplers on your bike . Just the
    > couplers alone are worth more than your bike.
    >
    > Occasionally an airline, expecially during the summer or if you're the
    last
    > to check in, will refuse to allow an oversize box and you will have to scramble to get your bike
    > shipped.
    >
    > For an explaination on the 62" requirement go to: http://www.sandsmachine.com/regs.htm
    >
    > Enjoy,
    >
    > Perry B

    I appreciate the reply and the link, Perry. I'm thinking now about two boxes, one for the wheels and
    one for the frame with spindle and fork removed. Instead of a backpack I'm thinking of just bringing
    a daypack which I'll carry on. Damn, they don't make it easy for you.

    Steve
     
  16. Alan

    Alan Guest

    Look into shipping your bike via FedEx or possibly UPS. It beats the airline baggage charge.

    --

    alan

    Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."

    "Jim F. Kemper" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Perry Butler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Steve,
    > >
    > > To meet the 62" requirement you need a folding bike or S & S couplers on your bike . Just the
    > > couplers alone are worth more than your bike.
    > >
    > > Occasionally an airline, expecially during the summer or if you're the
    > last
    > > to check in, will refuse to allow an oversize box and you will have to scramble to get your bike
    > > shipped.
    > >
    > > For an explaination on the 62" requirement go to: http://www.sandsmachine.com/regs.htm
    > >
    > > Enjoy,
    > >
    > > Perry B
    >
    > I appreciate the reply and the link, Perry. I'm thinking now about two boxes, one for the wheels
    > and one for the frame with spindle and fork removed. Instead of a backpack I'm thinking of just
    > bringing a daypack which I'll carry on. Damn, they don't make it easy for you.
    >
    > Steve
     
  17. Jim F. Kemper wrote:

    >"Perry Butler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> Steve,
    >>
    >> To meet the 62" requirement you need a folding bike or S & S couplers on your bike . Just the
    >> couplers alone are worth more than your bike.
    >>
    >> Occasionally an airline, expecially during the summer or if you're the
    >last
    >> to check in, will refuse to allow an oversize box and you will have to scramble to get your bike
    >> shipped.
    >>
    >> For an explaination on the 62" requirement go to: http://www.sandsmachine.com/regs.htm
    >>
    >> Enjoy,
    >>
    >> Perry B
    >
    >I appreciate the reply and the link, Perry. I'm thinking now about two boxes, one for the wheels
    >and one for the frame with spindle and fork removed. Instead of a backpack I'm thinking of just
    >bringing a daypack which I'll carry on. Damn, they don't make it easy for you.
    >
    >Steve
    >
    >
    >
    >
    Geez. What airline is this? Have you said and I missed it? It sounds like one to avoid. I've always
    put my bike in a standard bike shipping box (cardboard), or even a "self-manufactured" box, and off
    we go. No problem. No one has ever measured it.

    --
    *****************************
    Chuck Anderson • Boulder, CO http://www.CycleTourist.com Integrity is obvious. The lack of it
    is common.
    *****************************
     
  18. "Chuck Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]_s53...
    > Jim F. Kemper wrote:
    >
    > >"Perry Butler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >> Steve,
    > >>
    > >> To meet the 62" requirement you need a folding bike or S & S couplers
    on
    > >> your bike . Just the couplers alone are worth more than your bike.
    > >>
    > >> Occasionally an airline, expecially during the summer or if you're the
    > >last
    > >> to check in, will refuse to allow an oversize box and you will have to scramble to get your
    > >> bike shipped.
    > >>
    > >> For an explaination on the 62" requirement go to: http://www.sandsmachine.com/regs.htm
    > >>
    > >> Enjoy,
    > >>
    > >> Perry B
    > >
    > >I appreciate the reply and the link, Perry. I'm thinking now about two boxes, one for the wheels
    > >and one for the frame with spindle and fork removed. Instead of a backpack I'm thinking of just
    > >bringing a daypack which I'll carry on. Damn, they don't make it easy for you.
    > >
    > >Steve
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > Geez. What airline is this? Have you said and I missed it? It sounds like one to avoid. I've
    > always put my bike in a standard bike shipping box (cardboard), or even a "self-manufactured" box,
    > and off we go. No problem. No one has ever measured it.
    >
    > --
    > *****************************
    > Chuck Anderson • Boulder, CO http://www.CycleTourist.com Integrity is obvious. The lack of it is
    > common.
    > *****************************

    It's Delta, Chuck. That's what they told me over the phone. In person I may get lucky. But I've been
    hit with the fee before. I'll follow up early April.

    Steve
     
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