64 to 58 adaptor

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gerrit Van Wijk, Apr 21, 2003.

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  1. I think it could work. I don't need anything smaller than a 22 but for others with a 4 arm crank who
    would prefer a 20 tooth chainring... Cut a ring out of 1 mm thick steel. Drill 4 holes to fit a
    current 4 arm mtb design (64 spacing). Drill 5 holes to fit an older 5 arm mtb design (58 spacing).
    Attach the adaptar to the 4 arm crankarms. Attach a 20 tooth 58 chainring to the adaptor. You could
    even make an adaptor for a rear cog (18, 19).

    crossposted.
     
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  2. I realize why you would use such a thin piece, to keep from messing up the chainring spacing, but
    are you sure 1mm would be stiff enough not to buckle under load?

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  3. Maybe not. But since its a very small ring maybe it will.

    "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    news:[email protected]...
    > I realize why you would use such a thin piece, to keep from messing up the chainring spacing, but
    > are you sure 1mm would be stiff enough not to buckle under load?
    >
    > May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris
    >
    > Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  4. On Tue, 22 Apr 2003 21:53:04 +0200, gerrit van wijk wrote:

    > Maybe not. But since its a very small ring maybe it will.
    >
    > "Chris Zacho "The Wheelman"" <[email protected]> schreef in bericht
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I realize why you would use such a thin piece, to keep from messing up the chainring spacing, but
    >> are you sure 1mm would be stiff enough not to buckle under load?

    Since it's such a small ring, the load will be very high. Imagine standing on the pedal. Look at the
    ratio between the crankarm length and the radius of that little sprocket. Your weight times that
    ratio is the force applied on that 1mm thick ring. Dicey.

    Better idea: get a 94/58 crankset.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Become MicroSoft-free forever. Ask me how. _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
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