70 000 miles

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Garry Jones, Jun 3, 2003.

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  1. Garry Jones

    Garry Jones Guest

    I always knew I would be writing this post, I just never knew when..

    At the end of 1997 I mentioned in one of the rec.bicycles.* newsgroups that I had not had a puncture
    since 1994. A few people were amazed, others doubted, one even called me a liar.

    Well, I can not prove anything, but my puncture free run on the bike continued throughout 1998, 1999
    and into the 21st century. In the mid 1990's I was cycling up to 10 000 miles a year, now I am down
    to about 4000. I cycle on roads all over Sweden, some of which are not in a perfect state.

    I began to wonder if I would ever get another puncture, taking two inner tubes with me started to
    seem unnecessary, but I believe in the law according to Sod and if I had refrained from taken inner
    tubes I would have punctured for sure.

    To add to the authenticity of this posting I can also mention that I am president of a cycling club
    and a member of a training group of up to 30 cyclists, some of whom read these newsgroups. I have a
    large contact network of cyclists all over Sweden and I am not being presumptuous when I assume that
    a lot of frequent recreational cyclists know who I am. Consequently I would find it hard to get a
    puncture unnoticed.

    So, why this posting. Yes, it happened, the unthinkable occured tonight. I was out with a group of
    20 cyclists on a 60 mile ride when my rear wheel suddenly felt strange. First I thought it was a
    brake pad sticking and I looked back at it. I was at the back of the group and a slight gap opened
    up. I looked again, my tyre was deflating. PUNCTURE! - My first one since the summer of 1994 and
    after about 70 000 puncture free miles. My first puncture on the Pinarello Gavia I bought in
    February 1995. By the time I realised what had happened the group was so far up the road they didn't
    hear my shouts. I changed the inner tube slowly and surely and cycled the remaining 20 miles back
    home alone. As nobody actually saw this I could have changed it and not said anything if I had any
    interest in making up this story.

    I feel I have rejoined the human race today, now I too can get punctures just like everybody else. I
    suppose I am going to start getting them all the time now. Watch this space.

    I credit several factors for my puncture free run.

    1) Luck
    2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    3) That I use standard inner tubes
    4) That I check tyres often and change them when I see damage
    5) That I hang my bike up indoors after every ride.
    6) That I let some air out the tyres
    7) That I pump to max pressure 8 Bar before every ride, without taking temperture or expected road
    quality into consideration
    8) Luck, luck and more luck.

    Garry Jones President Mora Cycling Club English cyclist ResIDING in Sweden
     
    Tags:


  2. Dansmeyers

    Dansmeyers Guest

    >2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    >3) That I use standard inner tubes

    and they are...
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Garry Jones wrote:

    > I credit several factors for my puncture free run.
    >
    > 1) Luck
    > 2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    > 3) That I use standard inner tubes
    > 4) That I check tyres often and change them when I see damage
    > 5) That I hang my bike up indoors after every ride.
    > 6) That I let some air out the tyres
    > 7) That I pump to max pressure 8 Bar before every ride, without taking temperture or expected road
    > quality into consideration
    > 8) Luck, luck and more luck.

    Congratulations! :)

    I doubt 5 & 6 have anything to do with it, but I would add:
    9) That you look where you are going and avoid glass, etc.
    10) That you ride a good distance out from side of road to avoid the worst crap

    ~PB
     
  4. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

    Joined:
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    My congrats as well. BTW, are you a tire wiper?
     
  5. Gary Smiley

    Gary Smiley Guest

    Funny - I got a flat today- I also got one last Wednesday, and I got one a week ago Sunday (while
    touring in Montreal). I find that Europe tends to have less broken glass and debris on their roads
    than the United States.

    Garry Jones wrote:

    > I always knew I would be writing this post, I just never knew when..
    >
    > At the end of 1997 I mentioned in one of the rec.bicycles.* newsgroups that I had not had a
    > puncture since 1994. A few people were amazed, others doubted, one even called me a liar.
    >
    > Well, I can not prove anything, but my puncture free run on the bike continued throughout 1998,
    > 1999 and into the 21st century. In the mid 1990's I was cycling up to 10 000 miles a year, now I
    > am down to about 4000. I cycle on roads all over Sweden, some of which are not in a perfect state.
    >
    > I began to wonder if I would ever get another puncture, taking two inner tubes with me started to
    > seem unnecessary, but I believe in the law according to Sod and if I had refrained from taken
    > inner tubes I would have punctured for sure.
    >
    > To add to the authenticity of this posting I can also mention that I am president of a cycling
    > club and a member of a training group of up to 30 cyclists, some of whom read these newsgroups. I
    > have a large contact network of cyclists all over Sweden and I am not being presumptuous when I
    > assume that a lot of frequent recreational cyclists know who I am. Consequently I would find it
    > hard to get a puncture unnoticed.
    >
    > So, why this posting. Yes, it happened, the unthinkable occured tonight. I was out with a group of
    > 20 cyclists on a 60 mile ride when my rear wheel suddenly felt strange. First I thought it was a
    > brake pad sticking and I looked back at it. I was at the back of the group and a slight gap opened
    > up. I looked again, my tyre was deflating. PUNCTURE! - My first one since the summer of 1994 and
    > after about 70 000 puncture free miles. My first puncture on the Pinarello Gavia I bought in
    > February 1995. By the time I realised what had happened the group was so far up the road they
    > didn't hear my shouts. I changed the inner tube slowly and surely and cycled the remaining 20
    > miles back home alone. As nobody actually saw this I could have changed it and not said anything
    > if I had any interest in making up this story.
    >
    > I feel I have rejoined the human race today, now I too can get punctures just like everybody else.
    > I suppose I am going to start getting them all the time now. Watch this space.
    >
    > I credit several factors for my puncture free run.
    >
    > 1) Luck
    > 2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    > 3) That I use standard inner tubes
    > 4) That I check tyres often and change them when I see damage
    > 5) That I hang my bike up indoors after every ride.
    > 6) That I let some air out the tyres
    > 7) That I pump to max pressure 8 Bar before every ride, without taking temperture or expected road
    > quality into consideration
    > 8) Luck, luck and more luck.
    >
    > Garry Jones President Mora Cycling Club English cyclist ResIDING in Sweden
     
  6. x

    x Guest

    RE/
    >1) Luck
    >2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    >3) That I use standard inner tubes
    >4) That I check tyres often and change them when I see damage
    >5) That I hang my bike up indoors after every ride.
    >6) That I let some air out the tyres
    >7) That I pump to max pressure 8 Bar before every ride, without taking temperture or expected road
    > quality into consideration
    >8) Luck, luck and more luck.

    9) (Maybe...) Sweden has retunable glass containers?
    -----------------------
    PeteCresswell
     
  7. My flats have been way down since: 1. I started using kevlar lined tires;
    2. I use an extra kevlar lining inside it; and 3. I use thorn resistant tubes (because before that I
    had two flats from the kevlar lining rubbing against the thin tubes. i've got a good run going
    with no punctures, and will have to figure out the mileage, but I'm sure it's over 10,000 miles,
    mainly in the Milwaukee area. Previously, I averaged a flat every 1000 to 2000 miles. Att cycla
    paa Sverige maaste vara bra. "Garry Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I always knew I would be writing this post, I just never knew when..
    >
    > At the end of 1997 I mentioned in one of the rec.bicycles.* newsgroups that I had not had a
    > puncture since 1994. A few people were amazed, others doubted, one even called me a liar.
    >
    > Well, I can not prove anything, but my puncture free run on the bike continued throughout 1998,
    > 1999 and into the 21st century. In the mid 1990's I was cycling up to 10 000 miles a year, now I
    > am down to about 4000. I cycle on roads all over Sweden, some of which are not in a perfect state.
    >
    > I began to wonder if I would ever get another puncture, taking two inner tubes with me started to
    > seem unnecessary, but I believe in the law according to Sod and if I had refrained from taken
    > inner tubes I would have punctured for sure.
    >
    > To add to the authenticity of this posting I can also mention that I am president of a cycling
    > club and a member of a training group of up to 30 cyclists, some of whom read these newsgroups. I
    > have a large contact network of cyclists all over Sweden and I am not being presumptuous when I
    > assume that a lot of frequent recreational cyclists know who I am. Consequently I would find it
    > hard to get a puncture unnoticed.
    >
    > So, why this posting. Yes, it happened, the unthinkable occured tonight. I was out with a group of
    > 20 cyclists on a 60 mile ride when my rear wheel suddenly felt strange. First I thought it was a
    > brake pad sticking and I looked back at it. I was at the back of the group and a slight gap opened
    > up. I looked again, my tyre was deflating. PUNCTURE! - My first one since the summer of 1994 and
    > after about 70 000 puncture free miles. My first puncture on the Pinarello Gavia I bought in
    > February 1995. By the time I realised what had happened the group was so far up the road they
    > didn't hear my shouts. I changed the inner tube slowly and surely and cycled the remaining 20
    > miles back home alone. As nobody actually saw this I could have changed it and not said anything
    > if I had any interest in making up this story.
    >
    > I feel I have rejoined the human race today, now I too can get punctures just like everybody else.
    > I suppose I am going to start getting them all the time now. Watch this space.
    >
    > I credit several factors for my puncture free run.
    >
    > 1) Luck
    > 2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    > 3) That I use standard inner tubes
    > 4) That I check tyres often and change them when I see damage
    > 5) That I hang my bike up indoors after every ride.
    > 6) That I let some air out the tyres
    > 7) That I pump to max pressure 8 Bar before every ride, without taking temperture or expected road
    > quality into consideration
    > 8) Luck, luck and more luck.
    >
    > Garry Jones President Mora Cycling Club English cyclist ResIDING in Sweden
     
  8. Walter Mitty

    Walter Mitty Guest

    Garry Jones <[email protected]> brightened my day with his incisive wit when in
    news:[email protected] he conjectured that:

    > I always knew I would be writing this post, I just never knew when..
    >
    > At the end of 1997 I mentioned in one of the rec.bicycles.* newsgroups that I had not had a
    > puncture since 1994. A few people were amazed, others doubted, one even called me a liar.
    >
    > Well, I can not prove anything, but my puncture free run on the bike continued throughout 1998,
    > 1999 and into the 21st century. In the mid 1990's I was cycling up to 10 000 miles a year, now I
    > am down to about 4000. I cycle on roads all over Sweden, some of which are not in a perfect state.
    >
    > I began to wonder if I would ever get another puncture, taking two
    inner
    > tubes with me started to seem unnecessary, but I believe in the law according to Sod and if I had
    > refrained from taken inner tubes I would have punctured for sure.
    >
    > To add to the authenticity of this posting I can also mention that I am president of a cycling
    > club and a member of a training group of up to
    30
    > cyclists, some of whom read these newsgroups. I have a large contact network of cyclists all over
    > Sweden and I am not being presumptuous
    when
    > I assume that a lot of frequent recreational cyclists know who I am. Consequently I would find it
    > hard to get a puncture unnoticed.
    >
    > So, why this posting. Yes, it happened, the unthinkable occured
    tonight.
    > I was out with a group of 20 cyclists on a 60 mile ride when my rear wheel suddenly felt strange.
    > First I thought it was a brake pad
    sticking
    > and I looked back at it. I was at the back of the group and a slight
    gap
    > opened up. I looked again, my tyre was deflating. PUNCTURE! - My first one since the summer of
    > 1994 and after about 70 000 puncture free
    miles.
    > My first puncture on the Pinarello Gavia I bought in February 1995. By the time I realised what
    > had happened the group was so far up the road they didn't hear my shouts. I changed the inner tube
    > slowly and surely and cycled the remaining 20 miles back home alone. As nobody actually saw this I
    > could have changed it and not said anything if I had any interest in making up this story.
    >
    > I feel I have rejoined the human race today, now I too can get
    punctures
    > just like everybody else. I suppose I am going to start getting them
    all
    > the time now. Watch this space.
    >
    > I credit several factors for my puncture free run.
    >
    > 1) Luck
    > 2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    > 3) That I use standard inner tubes
    > 4) That I check tyres often and change them when I see damage
    > 5) That I hang my bike up indoors after every ride.
    > 6) That I let some air out the tyres
    > 7) That I pump to max pressure 8 Bar before every ride, without taking temperture or expected road
    > quality into consideration
    > 8) Luck, luck and more luck.
    >
    > Garry Jones President Mora Cycling Club English cyclist ResIDING in Sweden
    >

    I have certainly not ridden the same amount of miles but my 1995 Dawes Galaxy has certainly seen a
    few of them : mostly heavy laden.

    I too have never had a puncture.

    I put this down to one thing : riding the bumps. I don't sit fat assed on the saddle and any bumps,
    holes, obstacles generally see me out of the saddle, weight on the pedals, relieving the weight on
    first the front and then the rear tyres.

    Touch wood.

    Now I have upgraded my bike & wheels & my tyres I feel sure that I am doomed :)

    (btw, I changed the inner tubes twice a year regardless of mileage)

    --
    Walter Mitty.
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Garry Jones <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >I credit several factors for my puncture free run.
    >
    >1) Luck
    >2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    >3) That I use standard inner tubes
    >4) That I check tyres often and change them when I see damage
    >5) That I hang my bike up indoors after every ride.
    >6) That I let some air out the tyres
    >7) That I pump to max pressure 8 Bar before every ride, without taking temperture or expected road
    > quality into consideration
    >8) Luck, luck and more luck.

    So watching where you're going doesn't have anything to do with it?
     
  10. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Gary Smiley" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Funny - I got a flat today- I also got one last Wednesday,
    and I got one a
    > week ago Sunday (while touring in Montreal). I find that
    Europe tends to
    > have less broken glass and debris on their roads than the
    United States.

    That's because they have deposits on glass bottles. They also don't eat as much take-out food and
    drink, and if they do they stop, sit, and eat like civilized beings instead of stuffing their
    faces while driving. Plus they have government workers to pick up any trash that does make it to
    the roadside.

    Matt O.
     
  11. Garry Jones

    Garry Jones Guest

    DanSMeyers wrote:
    >
    > >2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.
    > >3) That I use standard inner tubes
    >
    > and they are...

    The tyres I have bought have been in the range $25 - $50

    When I bought the bike it had standard cheap Pirelli tyres. I bought Specalized for a few years, I
    changed to Michelin a few years ago when the Specalized tyres became extinct over here.

    The Specialized tyres were called Turbo/CR and had a tyre thread made up of these small characters <
    > / \ | - I got a lot of miles out of those, about 5000 miles a tyre.

    I have been through various Michelin tyres as they have changed and discontined certain models over
    here. But these inlcude "Axial Pro", "Axial Super Comp" and "Hi Lite Bi Synergic".

    Apart from those the tyre that last the longest was a Hutchinson that I bought in a local shop
    whilst away at a cycling event. I think I got over 15 000 miles out of that and even thought it did
    not have any sign of damage I changed it anyway one winter. When I was in France a couple of years
    ago I bought two Hutchinsons (can't remember model), but these showed damage after a few weeks of
    heavy cycling.

    All of the tyres mentioned above have been 622-20 - The tyres on the bike now are Michelin Pro Racer
    622-23, a store owner convinced me that 23 was better. I often maintained that as 20 gave you less
    road contact you were less likely to puncture. There may be nothing in that and you can call it
    superstition if you want but I am going back to 622-20. The tyres have been on the bike for about
    4000 miles and don't look damaged. The hole was on the road side of the inner tube so it's not from
    a rough spot inside the rim.

    The make of inner tubes I have never really paid any attention to. I change them yearly when I strip
    the frame down and give the bike a good wash and polish. And always when changing tyres. I just walk
    into any bike store and pick up a couple of standard inner tubes, I throw the boxes away, but I
    think the ones I have now might be called SHIO. I have noticed other more expensive inner tubes with
    descriptions like "super light weight" and so on, but I have not tried any of these.

    As for looking at the road as some others mentioned, sure I do that and try and steer around any
    objects. But I have ridden through glass several times. I read once that if you brake and steer when
    your in a pile of glass you are more likely to puncture.

    Garry Jones
     
  12. "(Pete Cresswell)" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >>
    > 9) (Maybe...) Sweden has retunable glass containers?
    > -----------------------
    > PeteCresswell

    That would be very useful if your bottles went off-key :)

    But seriously, I see lots of beer bottles smashed on the roads and
    bike paths, and those ARE returnable and have a deposit (10 cents?).

    There vwas a time people would wander around collecting them to earn the deposit, but I guess
    it's more fun just to smash them and watch cyclists flat out.

    (that could explain the nails strewn on the bike path as well).
     
  13. Walter Mitty <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > I too have never had a puncture.
    >
    >> the saddle and any bumps, holes, obstacles generally see me out of
    the
    > saddle, weight on the pedals, relieving the weight on first the front and then the rear tyres.
    >

    Could it be that broken glass and other debris sees you as well, and scurries out of
    your way? :)

    Some tubes seem slightly more flat-resistant (amazing how a tiny bit more rubber makes a
    difference). That's for regular tubes - the extra-thick / extra stiff ones are even better, at
    the cost of weight and perhaps ride / handling.

    I've also found I get more flats as the tread wears down (Vredstein touring tires - same
    happened with Hitchinson Globetrotters). So tread may not help traction, but it appears to help
    avoid punctures from broken glass and such.

    I also find far less debris when I ride out of the city. The bike paths are absolutely littered
    (intentionally - I've seen nails sprinkled along the path).

    ymmv
     
  14. In rec.bicycles.tech Matt O'Toole <[email protected]> wrote:

    > That's because they have deposits on glass bottles. They also don't eat as much take-out food and
    > drink, and if they do they stop, sit, and eat like civilized beings instead of stuffing their
    > faces while driving. Plus they have government workers to pick up any trash that does make it to
    > the roadside.

    This is generally true, at least in Finland. Most drink containers are plastic, not glass, but in
    either case there's a deposit and more than 90% are successfully recycled. However, I believe that
    the most important factor is the fact that people just don't throw garbage out of their cars. I
    don't know how often the roadsides are cleaned, but it must not be more than once a year, and for
    all practical purposes they are clean.

    -as
     
  15. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    "Matt O'Toole" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Gary Smiley" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > I find that Europe tends to have less broken glass and debris on their roads than the United
    > > States.
    >
    > That's because they have deposits on glass bottles.

    Really? How much is the deposit on glass bottles in France? And where does one redeem the deposit?
     
  16. Garry Jones <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > Apart from those the tyre that last the longest was a Hutchinson that I bought in a local shop
    > whilst away at a cycling event. I think I got over 15 000 miles out of that and even thought it
    > did not have any sign of damage I changed it anyway one winter. When I was in France a couple of
    > years ago I bought two Hutchinsons (can't remember model), but these showed damage after a few
    > weeks of heavy cycling.
    >

    The old non-Kevlar Hutchinsons with the "U" tread were brilliant tyres
    - I had a pair of these and they seemed to last for ages; despite the lack of anti-puncture
    measures, flats were very, very rare. The Kevlar version (with the blue band on the sidewall) and
    the more recent Excel model (that replaced the "U" tyres) don't seem to be anywhere near as good
    in terms of lifespan.

    David E. Belcher

    Dept. of Chemistry, University of York
     
  17. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Garry Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > 2) That I use quality puncture resistant tyres.

    Which ones?

    When my rear Continental Top Touring wore out at about 6000 miles and zero flats, I replaced both
    tires with Panaracer Pasela TG's because I'd gotten them cheap and their lightness appealed to me.

    I had three flats in the first 400 miles. Two punctures (glass and a roofing tack), and one
    pinch flat.

    It's hard to blame the punctures on the tires, but nevertheless I then did what I should have done
    in the first place, moving the hardly-worn front Conti to the rear, and replacing it with a new tire
    on the front (one of the Panaracers).

    I'm sticking with the TT2K's in the future. Unless Garry here has a better suggestion!

    RichC
     
  18. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    """"Apart from those the tyre that last the longest was a Hutchinson that I bought in a local shop
    whilst away at a cycling event. I think I got over 15 000 miles out of that and even thought it did
    not have any sign of damage I changed it anyway one winter.""""

    you got 15,000 miles out of "that"??

    What's "that" ????? Just thought I'd ask. Once in while one product of a series shows up that has
    singular characteristics. Maybe your fortune is to string them together and embrace them. To be able
    to embrace them. The NY L.Island Volvo owner iza good example. Go with the Flow.

    are there any other unusual qualities to your life? Do you know about statistical clustering?
     
  19. Andresmuro

    Andresmuro Guest

    Hi Garry:

    I am an ignoramous, like most Americans (except for for god Sheldon and vicegod Jobst). Hence, I
    know very little about Sweden or Swedes. A poll showed that less than 20% of Americans could point
    to Sweden on the map.

    These are somethings that I know:

    People are really pale white, with yellow hair.

    They make a weird looking car and a bad ass airplane

    The have weird names like Olaf and Eric (got this from reading Hagar the Horrible) and Morten (this
    is the name of my friend from Norway, but close enough)

    The have almost no sun.

    In medievall times they used to kill Romans, christians and others and drunk wine from their
    hollowed skulls (got the skull part from reading asterix)

    They had gods named thor and odin with lots of lightining and thunders (got this from reading
    marvel comics)

    The relevant thing that I know is that they are anal-retentive about cleanliness and perfection, and
    their streets are probably as smooth and clean as indoor tracks (ie, no thorns, glass, etc).
    Therefore, it is no wonder that you don't have flats. The anal retentive part I got from Jobst who
    is supposed to be from germany, but I've heard that the further north you go the more anal retentive
    people get.

    Almost forgot, they are the largest exporters of movies with women with voluptuous chests and big
    yellow hair.

    Is this about right? Would this knowledge put me at the level of the 20 percent who know
    about sweden?.

    Andres
     
  20. Garry Jones

    Garry Jones Guest

    "g.daniels" wrote:
    >
    > you got 15,000 miles out of "that"??

    Yep, most of the tyres I have used have been foldable, the Hutchinson was just there hanging up in a
    cycling shop that dealt solely in MTB and everyday bikes. When I returned some years later the shop
    was a pizzeria. (If this was the Twilight Zone I would now tell you that the pizza guy said that he
    had had the premises for over 10 years and that he didn't think that there had ever been a cycling
    shop there. And later on someone in the village would tell me there was a bike shop there but that
    it was nearly 80 years ago. An old black and white picture would reveal the guy that sold me the
    tire died in the 1920's. Lightening would flash and a cyclist would appear from nowhere on a 20's
    bike with wooden rims and a tyre round his neck).

    The Hutchinson tyre didn't have a model number or name on it.

    > are there any other unusual qualities to your life? Do you know about statistical clustering?

    I notice numerical patterns in everything, especially dates. I did my first 100 mile on June 3rd
    1989. This puncture occured on June 3rd, it's a milestone date for me. Statistical clustering?
    Enlighten me.

    Garry Jones
     
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