700x28 Hutchinson Acrobat Tires, true to width



M

maxo

Guest
Wondering if anybody has a set of these mounted with a ruler nearby. :p

I'm thinking about grabbing a pair for my SS bike, but they need to be a
true 28mm to clear the skinny fenders.

I know they're a bit taller, that's just fine.

I had a set of 700x32s before and I couldn't mount 35mm fenders with them
of course--but certainly some good, take no prisoners type city tires. :D
There's a sale at Nashbar is why I'm interested--at 12 per, you can't beat
that (compared to something like 40 for a Schwalbe Marathon, yikes).

Currently the bike sports a set of the cheap Hutchinson Flash 700x28s,
which clear the fenders just fine and have been flat free since
October--not bad for a 5 dollar tire. :) :)
 
M

Maggie

Guest
maxo wrote:
> Wondering if anybody has a set of these mounted with a ruler nearby.

:p
>
> I'm thinking about grabbing a pair for my SS bike, but they need to

be a
> true 28mm to clear the skinny fenders.
>
> I know they're a bit taller, that's just fine.
>
> I had a set of 700x32s before and I couldn't mount 35mm fenders with

them
> of course--but certainly some good, take no prisoners type city

tires. :D
> There's a sale at Nashbar is why I'm interested--at 12 per, you can't

beat
> that (compared to something like 40 for a Schwalbe Marathon, yikes).
>
> Currently the bike sports a set of the cheap Hutchinson Flash

700x28s,
> which clear the fenders just fine and have been flat free since
> October--not bad for a 5 dollar tire. :) :)


My goal this year is to understand what the hell a post like this
means, then to be able to answer it. ;-)
All good things,
Maggie
But, today, I greatly fear that my King is dead, and if I want a crown
I must go hunt it for myself.
 
D

Dan Daniel

Guest
On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 15:34:31 GMT, maxo <[email protected]> wrote:

>Wondering if anybody has a set of these mounted with a ruler nearby. :p
>
>I'm thinking about grabbing a pair for my SS bike, but they need to be a
>true 28mm to clear the skinny fenders.
>
>I know they're a bit taller, that's just fine.
>
>I had a set of 700x32s before and I couldn't mount 35mm fenders with them
>of course--but certainly some good, take no prisoners type city tires. :D
>There's a sale at Nashbar is why I'm interested--at 12 per, you can't beat
>that (compared to something like 40 for a Schwalbe Marathon, yikes).
>
>Currently the bike sports a set of the cheap Hutchinson Flash 700x28s,
>which clear the fenders just fine and have been flat free since
>October--not bad for a 5 dollar tire. :) :)
>


For your reference, a Panaracer Pasela Tourguard 700x32 is 27mm wide.
I've had them on my SS in the city for 6 months with no flats, and the
ride quality is nice. $20 at Nashbar.
 
M

maxo

Guest
On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 08:42:01 -0800, Dan Daniel wrote:

> For your reference, a Panaracer Pasela Tourguard 700x32 is 27mm wide


Everybody seems to like the Paselas--I should really try a set. I've
avoided them in the past for a very lame reason--I prefer black sidewall
tires since they don't get as grubby looking in the city. :p

Are the Paselas pretty "tall" allowing for lower pressure? My current
cheapie Hutchinsons are, and allow me to ride w 65-70 psi w/o fear of
snakebites, and absorbing the rough pavement in my 'hood (construction
everywhere and the resulting awful roads)

The paselas are 8 bucks at Nashbar atm. ;)
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
maxo wrote:

> Wondering if anybody has a set of these mounted with a ruler nearby.
> :p
>
> I'm thinking about grabbing a pair for my SS bike, but they need to
> be a true 28mm to clear the skinny fenders.
>
> I know they're a bit taller, that's just fine.


If anything, most tires tend to run small.

Matt O.
 
C

Chris Neary

Guest
>If anything, most tires tend to run small.

The width and height of any given model of tire will vary with rim width, so
without knowing the rim used when measurements are given, the numbers are
rather worthless.



Chris Neary
[email protected]

"Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could
you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the elements I
loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
3 Mar 2005 08:10:42 -0800,
<[email protected]>,
"Maggie" <[email protected]> wrote of tire tech talk:

>
>My goal this year is to understand what the hell a post like this
>means, then to be able to answer it. ;-)


It will take passion bordering obsession to understand it all in a
year. And more years before you can accurately answer it.

What's easy to learn is http:www.sheldonbrown.com/ . . .
where the pages are generally named with a contextual sort of logic.
For instance - http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

Well, the cassette page is named as it's pronounced in French and
therefore even extra educational.

Browse the site. There are answers to questions you'd never even think
about asking.
--
zk
 
D

Dan Daniel

Guest
On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 17:22:07 GMT, maxo <[email protected]> wrote:

>On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 08:42:01 -0800, Dan Daniel wrote:
>
>> For your reference, a Panaracer Pasela Tourguard 700x32 is 27mm wide

>
>Everybody seems to like the Paselas--I should really try a set. I've
>avoided them in the past for a very lame reason--I prefer black sidewall
>tires since they don't get as grubby looking in the city. :p
>


A couple of commutes in the rain and they become a somewhat mottled
dark gray! If that doesn't do it for you, shoe polish or a black magic
marker might work :)

>Are the Paselas pretty "tall" allowing for lower pressure? My current
>cheapie Hutchinsons are, and allow me to ride w 65-70 psi w/o fear of
>snakebites, and absorbing the rough pavement in my 'hood (construction
>everywhere and the resulting awful roads)
>


I'm running the '32' which is actually 27 at about 75-80 with no fear
of snakebites. I haven't tried lower pressure. And I don't see any
need to try lower pressure. I was using SOMA NewXpress tires, which
are actually made by Panaracer (the Urban model, maybe?). 32s, which
measure 26-27. I found it impossible to find that spot where the ride
was smooth and snakebites weren't a fear. But the Pasela TGs have a
smoother ride at higher pressure.

>The paselas are 8 bucks at Nashbar atm. ;)


Those aren't the Tourguard models, by the way. I've never used the
plain Paselas. I have no idea if the Tourguard has any effect on flat
resistance and/or ride quality.
 
M

Maggie

Guest
Zoot Katz wrote:
> 3 Mar 2005 08:10:42 -0800,
> <[email protected]>,
> "Maggie" <[email protected]> wrote of tire tech talk:
>
> >
> >My goal this year is to understand what the hell a post like this
> >means, then to be able to answer it. ;-)

>
> It will take passion bordering obsession to understand it all in a
> year. And more years before you can accurately answer it.
>
> What's easy to learn is http:www.sheldonbrown.com/ . . .
> where the pages are generally named with a contextual sort of logic.
> For instance - http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html
>
> Well, the cassette page is named as it's pronounced in French and
> therefore even extra educational.
>
> Browse the site. There are answers to questions you'd never even

think
> about asking.
> --
> zk


I'm had passion bordering on obsession. I don't want it again. I think
I will just ride the bike and let everyone else figure out the
technical stuff. I guess my real goal is to simplifly my life, not
complicate it.
Spring might be around the corner here in Jersey. Damn its March. I
hope its close. My car died and it would be nice to ride my bike to
work. But its freezing out.

I think I will change my goal to being able to make minor repairs on
the bike if something happens while riding. That is a do-able goal.
All Good Things
Maggie
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"Maggie" <[email protected]> writes:

> I think I will change my goal to being able to make minor repairs on
> the bike if something happens while riding. That is a do-able goal.


If you like, you could check around for any night school/"adult
continuing education" bike maintenance courses. I know they
exist here in Vancouver. I imagine it would have social as
well as educational appeal.


cheers,
Tom

--
-- Nothing is safe from me.
Above address is just a spam midden.
I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
 
M

maxo

Guest
On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 22:33:55 -0800, Dan Daniel wrote:

>>The paselas are 8 bucks at Nashbar atm. ;)

>
> Those aren't the Tourguard models, by the way. I've never used the
> plain Paselas. I have no idea if the Tourguard has any effect on flat
> resistance and/or ride quality.


If anything the plain Paselas should ride better since they're sans the
kevlar and should be more supple. ;)

They've been tearing up the streets around here for a couple years now,
replacing all kinds of utilities and strewing lovely sharp debris around,
so before I got the cheap Hutchinsons, I rode some kevlar belted tires. I
raved about not getting flats...and now I'm still not getting flats, but
not riding kevlar belts.

Go figure. :p
 
M

Maggie

Guest
Tom Keats wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "Maggie" <[email protected]> writes:
>
> > I think I will change my goal to being able to make minor repairs

on
> > the bike if something happens while riding. That is a do-able

goal.
>
> If you like, you could check around for any night school/"adult
> continuing education" bike maintenance courses. I know they
> exist here in Vancouver. I imagine it would have social as
> well as educational appeal.
>
>
> cheers,
> Tom
>
> --
> -- Nothing is safe from me.
> Above address is just a spam midden.
> I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca



I already signed up for our "adult school" I took pilates. I don't
think bike maintenance was an option. I should look for a course
which teaches a little bike maintenance.

But, I have been driving for over 30 years and I never changed a tire
on a car. Don't have a clue how to either. Maybe the same will happen
with biking. Does Triple A cover bicycle flats?
All good things,
Maggie
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
4 Mar 2005 09:44:12 -0800,
<[email protected]>,
"Maggie" <[email protected]> wrote:

>But, I have been driving for over 30 years and I never changed a tire
>on a car. Don't have a clue how to either.


I highly recommend not watching television unless you understand how
it works.

All cars should come as kits.
--
zk
 
J

Just zis Guy, you know?

Guest
On 4 Mar 2005 09:44:12 -0800, "Maggie" <[email protected]>
wrote in message
<[email protected]>:

>I have been driving for over 30 years and I never changed a tire
>on a car. Don't have a clue how to either.


Tcah! Not trying, are you? My wife can recognise and name most of
the parts of an engine. Because she's had to pass me one of most of
them at one time or another...

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
 
M

Maggie

Guest
Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
> On 4 Mar 2005 09:44:12 -0800, "Maggie" <[email protected]>
> wrote in message
> <[email protected]>:
>
> >I have been driving for over 30 years and I never changed a tire
> >on a car. Don't have a clue how to either.

>
> Tcah! Not trying, are you? My wife can recognise and name most of
> the parts of an engine. Because she's had to pass me one of most of
> them at one time or another...
>
> Guy
> --
> May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after

posting.
> http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk
>
> 85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound


I don't even know how to pop the hood of the car. I know how to pop
the gas tank to get gas, but the hood and the engine are a mystery to
me.
All Good Things,
Maggie
 
M

Maggie

Guest
Zoot Katz wrote:
> 4 Mar 2005 09:44:12 -0800,
> <[email protected]>,
> "Maggie" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >But, I have been driving for over 30 years and I never changed a

tire
> >on a car. Don't have a clue how to either.

>
> I highly recommend not watching television unless you understand how
> it works.
>
> All cars should come as kits.
> --
> zk



I raised three kids without understanding how they "work"....and
everything turned out ok. ;-) They did not come with any directions.
All good things,
Maggie.
 
M

Maggie

Guest
Claire Petersky wrote:
> "Maggie" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
> > But, I have been driving for over 30 years and I never changed a

tire
> > on a car. Don't have a clue how to either. Maybe the same will

happen
> > with biking.

>
> Maggie, you might be interested in:
>
>

http://groups-beta.google.com/group...5d?scoring=d&q=changed+my+first+flat+petersky
>
> or
>
> http://tinyurl.com/7ymxd
>
>
> --
> Warm Regards,
>
> Claire Petersky
> Home of the meditative cyclist:
> http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
> Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
> See the books I've set free at:
> http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky


Thanks Claire, that was a good read. I should learn a little about the
bike if I am going to ride alone. I can't see myself doing maintenance
on a bike or changing a tire. For some reason I really can't even
imagine it. I'm not proud of the fact that in all my years of driving
I have never changed a tire, but I made sure my daughter knew how to do
it.

I think I just decided at one point in my life that I would never do
things such as change tires, cut the lawn, take out the garbage or
shovel snow. I'm a wuss. It's not my fault, I married a man who thinks
those jobs belong to him, so I don't even think about it.

Over the years I developed the philosophy...."Why do it yourself, when
you can get someone to do it for you. ;-)" I know this can't last
forever. One day I will be forced into a situation where I will have to
get my hands dirty. I just hope I don't ruin my manicure. :)
All Good Things,
Maggie
 
A

Andrew Price

Guest
Maggie wrote
>
> I think I just decided at one point in my life that I would never do
> things such as change tires, cut the lawn, take out the garbage or
> shovel snow. I'm a wuss. It's not my fault, I married a man who thinks
> those jobs belong to him, so I don't even think about it.
>


So long as it doesn't endanger anyone, there is a lot to be said for that
viewpoint.

Things we like doing, we tend to get better at and do well. The obverse is
also true.

Sometimes its worth questioning exactly why we don't like doing something's,
but if there is an ok reason why not, then pitch to your strengths and don't
try to pretend or be pressured into doing something you don't want to do.

Its not about gender, its about horses for courses.

best. Andrew (who makes a mean compost, can true a wheel on a good day,
but is of little other domestic relevance)