A bikey for wifey......

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Chris French, Jan 26, 2003.

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  1. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    January, cold, and a cyclists thoughts turn to warmer times to come........

    Plans for this year include to get out on more family cycles with Elinor in the trailer and SWMBO.

    I'm trying to encourage Helen to get her own bike (she does have an old one - ex-police auction
    which did sterling work as a London commuter in her student days, but it's not really up to the job)

    We can get bye with the existing bikes, but it's not ideal. She doesn't like drops so she can ride
    on the normal utility/towing bike (an ex MTB, but not light - hub gears and brakes, stand, and
    various gubbins). We are a similar size, but of course it's never quite the right fit either.

    I then can use the tourer (a much modified Dalesman Guy) to tow the trailer, but I'm not so happy
    with that, it's generally not a 'good feeling' - and I don't feel as confident with the brakes -
    though it's done heavy loaded touring in hilly areas so should cope ok really).

    So a bike for wifey is on the horizon, but TBH, I never really keep up with what's on the market so
    I'm looking for some suggestions to shortcut some of the market research.

    We aren't looking at mega distances, I expect no more than 20-30 miles at the most at the moment
    (I'm towing the trailer for starters - and this is Yorkshire...), though who knows in the future?

    Road usage mostly, though maybe with some light 'offroading' gravelled forest tracks, ex railway
    lines etc.

    Thoughts so far:

    Fairly cheap (max GBP 300, preferably less) an ex 2002 bike on sale would be good. 2nd hand is a
    possibility if something suitable turned up, but I'm looking for a decent bike here to make
    riding enjoyable

    Flat handlebars, reasonably upright position, comfort, not speed is going to be more of an
    important factor.

    Complete with mudguards and rack, or at least with the necessary braze-ons.

    Suggestions?
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
    Tags:


  2. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > January, cold, and a cyclists thoughts turn to warmer times to come........
    >
    > Plans for this year include to get out on more family cycles with Elinor in the trailer and SWMBO.

    ????

    snip

    > Fairly cheap (max GBP 300, preferably less) an ex 2002 bike on sale would be good. 2nd hand is a
    > possibility if something suitable turned up, but I'm looking for a decent bike here to make riding
    > enjoyable

    It would be better to pay whatever it takes to get her the bike she is happy with than to set a
    tight budget and fail to get her cycling. Money is not the key issue here -- happy wife is.

    If she wants an unsuitable machine show her something better. If she sets her heart on
    unsuitable machine -- pay the money. Her reduced speed will be compensated by the increased load
    you will be carrying.

    T
     
  3. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Tony W <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >"chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> January, cold, and a cyclists thoughts turn to warmer times to come........
    >>
    >> Plans for this year include to get out on more family cycles with Elinor in the trailer
    >> and SWMBO.
    >
    >????
    >
    She Who must Be Obeyed....

    >snip
    >
    >> Fairly cheap (max GBP 300, preferably less) an ex 2002 bike on sale would be good. 2nd hand is a
    >> possibility if something suitable turned up, but I'm looking for a decent bike here to make
    >> riding enjoyable
    >
    >It would be better to pay whatever it takes to get her the bike she is happy with than to set a
    >tight budget and fail to get her cycling. Money is not the key issue here -- happy wife is.
    >
    I'm more than aware of the benefits of paying more if necessary for the bike. However, budget is
    more set by the wife rather than me .. If I suggest paying - what with various other financial
    demands - would be 'too much' then we will just end up with continuing the current situation.

    Better than what we have right now is the target, which shouldn't be hard to meet.

    >If she wants an unsuitable machine show her something better. If she sets her heart on unsuitable
    >machine -- pay the money. Her reduced speed will be compensated by the increased load you will be
    >carrying.
    >
    Whatever the machine I doubt it will lead to me carrying any more load......... (and with around 25
    kG of trailer and kiddie behind.....)
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  4. John

    John Guest

    "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Road usage mostly, though maybe with some light 'offroading' gravelled forest tracks, ex railway
    > lines etc.
    >
    > Fairly cheap (max GBP 300, preferably less) an ex 2002 bike on sale would be good. 2nd hand is a
    > possibility if something suitable turned up, but I'm looking for a decent bike here to make riding
    > enjoyable
    >
    > Flat handlebars, reasonably upright position, comfort, not speed is going to be more of an
    > important factor.
    >
    > Complete with mudguards and rack, or at least with the necessary braze-ons.
    >

    Have bough Dawes Tanami for same reasons. A bit over budget, but there are similar bikes lower in
    the range.

    Having mudguards and rack fitted must be worth about £70, unless you already have some knocking
    around in the shed.

    Cheers,
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    chris French wrote:

    > Fairly cheap (max GBP 300, preferably less) an ex 2002 bike on sale would be good. 2nd hand is a
    > possibility if something suitable turned up, but I'm looking for a decent bike here to make riding
    > enjoyable

    > Flat handlebars, reasonably upright position, comfort, not speed is going to be more of an
    > important factor.

    > Complete with mudguards and rack, or at least with the necessary braze-ons.

    > Suggestions?

    M-I-L bought a Dawes Chilliwack for about that with guards and "stuff" fitted just before Christmas;
    my wife has a Dawes Saratoga which was slightly cheaper. Good bikes, sensible spec, no fuss or
    nonsense. What can I say? I've never been disappointed with a Dawes.

    If looking for mail order rather than LBS purchase, the equivalent from Edinburgh Bicycle has to be
    attractive on bang-per-buck.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  6. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > January, cold, and a cyclists thoughts turn to warmer times to come........
    >
    > Plans for this year include to get out on more family cycles with Elinor in the trailer and SWMBO.

    I know it's not exactly within budget, but a tandem is the ideal solution for family rides,
    especially if you have differing paces.

    cheers, clive
     
  7. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Tony W <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >"chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> I'm more than aware of the benefits of paying more if necessary for the bike. However, budget is
    >> more set by the wife rather than me .. If I suggest paying - what with various other financial
    >> demands - would be 'too much' then we will just end up with continuing the current situation.
    >
    >300 it is then. You are clearly 'on message'.
    >
    Indeed...........

    >
    >A Dawes or a hybrid? Possibly an Edinburgh own brand though Leeds is a bit far to test it out.
    >Possibly a Ridgeback -- a friend thinks they are nice, comfortable, machines.
    >
    >Specialized WSD Expedition ?? Penny change on your budget!!
    >
    I'll have a look. Ta.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  8. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, W K <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >"John" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >> >
    >> > Road usage mostly, though maybe with some light 'offroading' gravelled forest tracks, ex
    >> > railway lines etc.
    >> >
    >> > Fairly cheap (max GBP 300, preferably less) an ex 2002 bike on sale would be good. 2nd hand is
    >> > a possibility if something suitable turned up, but I'm looking for a decent bike here to make
    >> > riding enjoyable
    >> >
    >> > Flat handlebars, reasonably upright position, comfort, not speed is going to be more of an
    >> > important factor.
    >> >
    >> > Complete with mudguards and rack, or at least with the necessary braze-ons.
    >> >
    >>
    >> Have bough Dawes Tanami for same reasons.

    >I've seen a Spec. hardrock decked out like this. I have a giant boulder- cheaper but not as good
    >gears etc.
    >
    >> Having mudguards and rack fitted must be worth about £70, unless you
    >already
    >> have some knocking around in the shed.
    >
    >Maybe with blackburn and SKS. BUT: Bor yeuh rack 12 quid. (edinburgh sales =9) I also got rather
    >scoopy zefal cities from Settle cycles - 10 quid.
    >
    I'm happy to fit Racks and mudguards myself anyway, (or the shop to do
    it) least I know what I'm getting. I don't use anything but SKS guards anymore, but a cheapy rack
    would be ok for this bike., DW is unlikely to beak them like I tend to anyway. alternatively
    take the old Blackburn off another bike and use as an excuse to replace it with another Tubus
    Cro-Mo one, with which I'm very please on the utility bike.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  9. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Clive George <[email protected]> writes
    >"chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> January, cold, and a cyclists thoughts turn to warmer times to come........
    >>
    >> Plans for this year include to get out on more family cycles with Elinor in the trailer
    >> and SWMBO.
    >
    >I know it's not exactly within budget, but a tandem is the ideal solution for family rides,
    >especially if you have differing paces.
    >
    It's another thing on the list of things for the future....... Along with a 'bent (which I've been
    idly dreaming about since I tired a Peer Gynt out one day in mid-Wales about 10 years ago now.)

    Actually, I suspect if I was to get a bent then Helen would soon take a shine to it - it's the
    normal way with things of the 'why do you want that - oh actually it's rather good type....'

    Anyway, thanks for the various suggestions. Having a look at the Dawes range looks a good
    place to start.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  10. W K

    W K Guest

    "John" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Road usage mostly, though maybe with some light 'offroading' gravelled forest tracks, ex railway
    > > lines etc.
    > >
    > > Fairly cheap (max GBP 300, preferably less) an ex 2002 bike on sale would be good. 2nd hand is a
    > > possibility if something suitable turned up, but I'm looking for a decent bike here to make
    > > riding enjoyable
    > >
    > > Flat handlebars, reasonably upright position, comfort, not speed is going to be more of an
    > > important factor.
    > >
    > > Complete with mudguards and rack, or at least with the necessary braze-ons.
    > >
    >
    > Have bough Dawes Tanami for same reasons. A bit over budget, but there
    are
    > similar bikes lower in the range.

    I've seen a Spec. hardrock decked out like this. I have a giant boulder- cheaper but not as good
    gears etc.

    > Having mudguards and rack fitted must be worth about £70, unless you
    already
    > have some knocking around in the shed.

    Maybe with blackburn and SKS. BUT: Bor yeuh rack 12 quid. (edinburgh sales =9) I also got rather
    scoopy zefal cities from Settle cycles - 10 quid.
     
  11. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Tony W wrote:
    >>SWMBO.
    > ????

    She Who Must Be Obeyed, from H Rider Haggard's novel She, as used (and brought to prominence) by
    Rumpole of the Bailey, who used the phrase to describe his wife Hilda (particularly where the
    purchase of Vim was involved)

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  12. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tony W wrote:
    > >>SWMBO.
    > > ????
    >
    > She Who Must Be Obeyed, from H Rider Haggard's novel She, as used (and brought to prominence) by
    > Rumpole of the Bailey, who used the phrase to describe his wife Hilda (particularly where the
    > purchase of Vim was involved)

    A phrase which is always redolent of the Iron Lady (aka Milk Snatcher for our older members -- but
    that was before she achieved REAL power!!) -- as such a vision of absolute terror.

    T
     
  13. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I'm more than aware of the benefits of paying more if necessary for the bike. However, budget is
    > more set by the wife rather than me .. If I suggest paying - what with various other financial
    > demands - would be 'too much' then we will just end up with continuing the current situation.

    300 it is then. You are clearly 'on message'.

    > Better than what we have right now is the target, which shouldn't be hard to meet.
    >
    > >If she wants an unsuitable machine show her something better. If she
    sets
    > >her heart on unsuitable machine -- pay the money. Her reduced speed will
    be
    > >compensated by the increased load you will be carrying.
    > >
    > Whatever the machine I doubt it will lead to me carrying any more load......... (and with around
    > 25 kG of trailer and kiddie behind.....)

    A Dawes or a hybrid? Possibly an Edinburgh own brand though Leeds is a bit far to test it out.
    Possibly a Ridgeback -- a friend thinks they are nice, comfortable, machines.

    Specialized WSD Expedition ?? Penny change on your budget!!

    T
     
  14. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Tony W wrote:

    >> She Who Must Be Obeyed, from H Rider Haggard's novel She

    > A phrase which is always redolent of the Iron Lady (aka Milk Snatcher for our older members -- but
    > that was before she achieved REAL power!!) -- as such a vision of absolute terror.

    Yes, the other thing for which Nicholas Parsons' father will be reviled by history :) And her
    middle name as also Hilda! Something about Hildas obviously.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  15. chris French <[email protected]> wrote
    > I'm trying to encourage Helen to get her own bike (she does have an old one - ex-police
    > auction which did sterling work as a London commuter in her student days, but it's not really
    > up to the job)
    >
    > We can get bye with the existing bikes, but it's not ideal. She doesn't like drops so she can ride
    > on the normal utility/towing bike (an ex MTB, but not light - hub gears and brakes, stand, and
    > various gubbins). We are a similar size, but of course it's never quite the right fit either.

    Speaking as a woman who enjoys cycling a great deal but don't like drop bars, I would go for either
    a lightweight rigid MTB fitted with slicks rack & mudguards, or a lightweight rigid hybrid fitten
    with slicks rack & mudguards. It will be much easier to find the latter than the former. Most 300
    quid MTBs come with susp forks, and the cheaper ones have cheap & nasty frames. But there are some
    nice hybrids on the market. The guy down the hall has a Ridgeback Velocity which looks really nice.
    The components aren't top notch (for example it doesn't have replaceable chainrings) but as things
    wear out you can upgrade them. The important thing is that it has a nice frame (at least it looks
    nice, I'm not exactly sure how to tell a really good frame from just an OK one) and you can put rack
    & mudguards on it, it has V-brakes and straight bars.

    -Myra
     
  16. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Myra VanInwegen
    <[email protected]> writes
    >chris French <[email protected]> wrote
    >> I'm happy to fit Racks and mudguards myself anyway, (or the shop to do
    >> it) least I know what I'm getting. I don't use anything but SKS guards anymore, but a cheapy rack
    >> would be ok for this bike.
    >
    >I've got a couple of Nimrod racks from the LBS that I really like. They have a metal plate along
    >the center of the rack to better support things you strap across the rack (like floppy jackets) and
    >it has a superb light-mounting plate on the back to which you can attach a reflector or light with
    >reflector holes (like Cateye AU-whatever, the British Standard one), or one of those nice European
    >Standard lights
    >
    >But they're probably not the strongest; my hubby has broken a Nimrod rack (different make from
    >mine) because he carries a huge, heavy, briefcase-pannier thing.

    I had a Nimrod rack on the Utility bike. But it gets a hard life with plenty of panniers full of
    shopping etc. and it broke (most of the welds went at the top) something like this would be fine on
    my wife's bike, but I just break racks( the Nimrod, a front Blackburn lowrider and bent a rear
    Blackburn rack. I could of course buy 3-4 cheap but ok racks like a Nimrod for the price of a Tubus
    one, but I prefer the reliability.

    I am now though a fan of the standard light mounting points and wouldn't buya rack without those
    now, makes mounting rear lights so easy - esp. when my fave rear light is the Hella at the moment.
    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  17. chris French <[email protected]> wrote
    > I'm happy to fit Racks and mudguards myself anyway, (or the shop to do
    > it) least I know what I'm getting. I don't use anything but SKS guards anymore, but a cheapy rack
    > would be ok for this bike.

    I've got a couple of Nimrod racks from the LBS that I really like. They have a metal plate along the
    center of the rack to better support things you strap across the rack (like floppy jackets) and it
    has a superb light-mounting plate on the back to which you can attach a reflector or light with
    reflector holes (like Cateye AU-whatever, the British Standard one), or one of those nice European
    Standard lights like B&M DToplight or Hella something-or-other which have huge reflectors and a very
    wide angle of visibility. I've got two of these racks and am very pleased with them.

    But they're probably not the strongest; my hubby has broken a Nimrod rack (different make from
    mine) because he carries a huge, heavy, briefcase-pannier thing. We've put on his commuter bike
    the rack that came with the tandem, which has thicker supports and more of them (four instead of
    the usual 3).

    -Myra
     
  18. "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tony W wrote:
    >
    > >> She Who Must Be Obeyed, from H Rider Haggard's novel She
    >
    > > A phrase which is always redolent of the Iron Lady (aka Milk Snatcher for our older members --
    > > but that was before she achieved REAL power!!) -- as such a vision of absolute terror.
    >
    > Yes, the other thing for which Nicholas Parsons' father will be reviled by history :) And her
    > middle name as also Hilda! Something about Hildas obviously.
    >
    Nothing wrong with Hildas (not that it's my SWMBO's name or anything)
     
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