A bit of off-road........

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Martin Bulmer, Sep 16, 2003.

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  1. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Ian <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > >> Sorry, I thought your first question was rhetorical, as I was not being forced off the road
    > >> maliciously then yes,I would still help. The truck driver probably did not take to the verge in
    > >> case he ran into a ditch he could not see.
    > >
    > > You are obviously a warm and forgiving person ,able to see the good in almost everyone, you have
    > > my admiration.
    > >
    > Marc, I always prefer to give people the benefit of the doubt,

    I would suggest that you haven't been kicked in the head often enough, but that would leave me open
    to accusations of cynicsm.

    > it makes me feel good, most people have the ability to do good or bad

    or both at the same time without realising that they are doing either.

    >and I like to think that showing an example has some effect even if only very small effect.

    Which is exactly what was happening in the scenario above, lorry driver seen being ignorant ( for
    whatever reason) has set an example...

    --
    Marc Stickers,decals,membership,cards, T shirts, signs etc for clubs and associations of all types.
    http://www.jaceeprint.demon.co.uk/
     


  2. In article <1g1flc6.1h5wb9k1rgm4auN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Ian <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Marc, I always prefer to give people the benefit of the doubt,
    >
    > I would suggest that you haven't been kicked in the head often enough, but that would leave me
    > open to accusations of cynicsm.

    Cynicism? No, just someone who gives the impression that they hate everyone else in the world on the
    assumption that everyone else is going to hate them first. Remind me where not to go when I need,
    "Stickers, decals, membership,cards, T shirts, signs etc for clubs and associations of all types."

    Colin
     
  3. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > > > Marc, I always prefer to give people the benefit of the doubt,
    > >
    > > I would suggest that you haven't been kicked in the head often enough, but that would leave me
    > > open to accusations of cynicsm.
    >
    > Cynicism? No, just someone who gives the impression that they hate everyone else in the world on
    > the assumption that everyone else is going to hate them first.

    I'm obviously not a very good impressionist.

    > Remind me where not to go when I need, "Stickers, decals, membership,cards, T shirts, signs etc
    > for clubs and associations of all types."

    Prontaprint?

    --
    Marc Stickers,decals,membership,cards, T shirts, signs etc for clubs and associations of all types.
    http://www.jaceeprint.demon.co.uk/
     
  4. In news:[email protected], VERNON LEVY <[email protected]> expounded
    sagaciously:
    >> Sadly, I fear he will be anatomically incapable of complying, but if he got the transporter into
    >> that little lane, there's just a chance that he may be able to put it where I suggested.
    >
    > Oh humm another cycling apostle of the absurd. It's absurd to assume that such acts foster
    > goodwill towards cyclists and that indefinite immunity from violence inflicted by an aggrieved
    > motorist is guaranteed.
    >
    > Can't uk.rec.cycling.knobheads be established for the minority who revel in exchanging tales of
    > the aggrieved persecuted holders of the torch for cycling's non-existing future should their
    > rediculous mindset become the norm? At least they'll be out of harms way :)

    Thanks, Vern, but you had to be there. The guy drove AT me. I am normally your typical
    mild-mannered, red-light complying, touring cyclist. I often stop and help out motorists who
    are lost, a real saint of the road. But he drove AT me, forcing me off the road. I would,
    however, love to see the newsgroup you suggest get up and running, and would read it fervently.
    It sounds like fun.
    --

    Martin Bulmer

    Pie Conservation Threat
     
  5. In news:[email protected], Tony W <[email protected]> expounded
    sagaciously:
    > "Martin Bulmer" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Whilst riding along a narrow unfenced road today, the likes of which I would think twice about
    >> using in a car, I encountered a car transporter coming the other way. He could have driven onto
    >> the verge, but he felt that it would be more suitable if I did, anyway, he wanted to stop and ask
    >> me for directions, being a little lost. I didn't stop, but I gave him directions using a
    >> combination of monosyllables and sign language. Sadly, I fear he will be anatomically incapable
    >> of complying, but if he got the transporter into that little lane, there's just a chance that he
    >> may be able to put it where I suggested.
    >
    > Where was the harm in answering (assuming you could) his question? Have you never taken a wrong
    > turning and got yourself lost or confused in a strange place?

    I would ask directions politely, rather than drive at my potential saviour, forcing him off the
    road. Perhaps I didn't make this clear enough in the original post. He nearly killed me.
    --

    Martin Bulmer

    Pie Conservation Threat
     
  6. Eatmorepies

    Eatmorepies Guest

    > I too have given up giving directions to lorry drivers whos idea of requesting help is " Oy mate ,
    > how do I get to ......? " with no thought of a please or thank you. Do they consider me "stupid
    > and ignorant " when I tell them that I would have answered if asked politely, I don't know or
    > care, consideration and politeness is a two way street, especially when it's you that wants
    > something from the other person.
    >

    Pehaps the chap was working class and to him "Oi (correct spelling btw) (1) mate" is a courteous
    salutation.

    (1) sorry, couldn't resist it.

    John
     
  7. In news:[email protected], Tony W <[email protected]> expounded
    sagaciously:
    > "marc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:1g1fddy.qpgn4dtora68N%[email protected]...
    >>>>
    >>> Marc, are you a troll? The OP states the guy in the large vehicle was in need of directions,
    >>> i.e. HE WAS LOST
    >>
    >> " a narrow unfenced road today, the likes of which I would think twice about using in a car, I
    >> encountered a car transporter coming the other way. He could have driven onto the verge, but he
    >> felt that it would be more suitable if I did,"
    >>
    >> Lost or not he doesn't sound like the most considerate of drivers, so why should he expect
    >> consideration from other road users?
    >
    >
    > Maybe he wasn't -- or maybe he was worried that he might get bogged down if he moved off the
    > tarmac -- even if there was relatively little.
    >
    > Whatever, he requested some help which was refused and he was then verbally abused.
    >
    > Yes -- a clear victory for the forces of cycling :~(
    >
    > T

    Yes he could have been worried about the state of the verge. I was certainly in two minds about
    whether I wanted it to be hard enough to ride on, or soft enough to fall on, as I was forced to
    trust myself to it. I apologise to the group if I seem to advocate abusing other road users.
    This is not normally my philosophy. If I leave any lasting impression on the driver, I hope it
    is that cyclists are vulnerable people who get cross when very, very frightened. I hope he's
    still stuck there.

    --

    Martin Bulmer

    Pie Conservation Threat
     
  8. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Eatmorepies <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > > I too have given up giving directions to lorry drivers whos idea of requesting help is " Oy mate
    > > , how do I get to ......? " with no thought of a please or thank you. Do they consider me
    > > "stupid and ignorant " when I tell them that I would have answered if asked politely, I don't
    > > know or care, consideration and politeness is a two way street, especially when it's you that
    > > wants something from the other person.
    > >
    >
    > Pehaps the chap was working class and to him "Oi (correct spelling btw) (1) mate" is a courteous
    > salutation.
    >
    > (1) sorry, couldn't resist it.

    Possibly. Incidentaly, in an incident packed ride home last night I met another one. As I slogged up
    a 1-7 hill a Volvo coming towards me in a narrow lane swung at 30 degrees towards me and the driver
    stuck his head out of the window and said

    " Do you know where the dog home is? "

    Bearing in mind the comments of this NG on being a helpful cyclist I answered " Aergaghhhh" (correct
    spelling btw) and motioned behind me somewhere.

    --
    Marc Stickers,decals,membership,cards, T shirts, signs etc for clubs and associations of all types.
    http://www.jaceeprint.demon.co.uk/
     
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