a decent comfortable seat



roundnround

New Member
Jan 21, 2014
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Can anyone recommend one? Strictly for recreational use. No racing or mountain biking. I'm on the sidewalk or mild trail riding (no hills. It's Fla). The seat on my Fuji Blvd is not original. It says "viscount" on the underside (from an old Viscount bike maybe?). It's soft and padded but seems to be too narrow. I've tried different adjustments including handlebars but no dice. My legs can take me further but my a$$ gives out. I've tried those spongy covers but still ng. Maybe a cruiser type seat? Any input appreciated.
 

roundnround

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Jan 21, 2014
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I just thought of something: Maybe I'm on my seat too much. I've looked at kids riding their bikes and they are off the seat pedaling a lot of times. The way I did as a kid. Also I see those Tour deFrance guys do the same thing at times. Maybe that's why I don't remember having a sore a$$ as a kid. I was off the seat a lot. Of course I will have to get used to pedaling that way again. It's a speed/power position I would think.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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If you have a Viscount seat it is probably over 25 years old. It may have broken down padding and be 'sway back' like and old horse.

It's not so much the width or narrowness of the saddle that makes it uncomfortable, but the match of that dimension to the width of your rear and where on your ass and saddle you like to position yourself. Also, the shape of the saddle and amount and type of padding affects comfort.

Some saddles are flat, some are curved and roll off at the sides. Some taper to the nose faster than others. Some have channels or cut-outs to relieve pressure. Some are well padded and some have very little padding. Some have a radical nose drop.

The truth of the matter is that many riders will find the narrow, hard saddle more comfortable than the softer, wider design.

This is an area in which only you can make the correct call. There is not much valid advice can be given over the internet when it comes to saddles. Your best bet is to go to a bike shop and sit on a few types. Perhaps you can ask to take a short test ride or two on a couple of their demo bikes.

Some shops offer a low cost (or free if you purchase a saddle) fitting system of some sort. I'm skeptical of them, but they may get you a 'start' to finding something more comfortable than your old Viscount saddle. Both Terry and Adamo manufacture good 'comfort' saddles, but you may not require anything in the 'comfort' line. You may only need a better fit, more or less padding or a slightly different shape. There's a few variable here, so don't be afraid to swap onto a few different models.

As you suggested, varying your position on the bike helps, although I think we both suspect your seat is still not a match to your body. Racers and tourists that spend many hours in the saddle are fitted on their bikes to carry more of the body weight on the hands/handlebars and shift their weight to the pedals, hands and saddle often and automatically.
 

rclouviere

Member
Apr 10, 2011
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Selle Anotomica.

I nearly quit cycling several years ago due to discomfort. This saddle was recommended, and has been a Godsend.
 

Rouler214

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Feb 4, 2014
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I'm a big fan of the specialized romin evo - but I was having massive problems from my position due to a prior back injury, so I went to the shop and got measured up for one properly. Ended up with the romin which has been great. Not sure if your local shop will do this - but mine actually allowed me to trial two for a little bit. Saddles are kinda personal - I'd ask them and see if they let you.

Doesn't competitive cyclist allow you to test & return too? Just make sure you put tape over the rails so you don't scratch them.
 

alfeng

Well-Known Member
Jul 23, 2005
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FWIW. When in doubt, choose a "standard" BROOKS B17 saddle (THE choice of long distance touring riders) ....
  • Some periodic maintenance is required ... A break-in period may-or-may-not be required.
NB. The distance between the top of the saddle & the rails is MORE than on a "plastic" saddle, so the seatpost needs to be lowered, accordingly. BTW. VISCOUNT is what 'I' will refer to as a second tier saddle maker whose saddles are often copies of those made by "name brand" saddle makers (e.g., Selle Italia, Selle San Marco, etc.).
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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Quote by Rouler214:
"Doesn't competitive cyclist allow you to test & return too?"

Yes. Although they recently revised their "No Questions Asked" policy, they still offer a very good return policy.


100% GUARANTEED RETURNS We guarantee your total satisfaction and offer a world-class returns policy. If your new and unused gear just doesn't fit your needs, we will issue you a full refund. Additionally, we accept used gear for credit so long as we receive it within 90 days of purchase. If your gear fails due to manufacturing defect, we welcome you to contact us in order to facilitate a warranty evaluation by the manufacturer.


You are going to get credit, not a refund, on returned 'used' gear so you can exchange it for another seat or whatever. I would not buy a used, returned seat. Someone sets their sweaty, stinky ass on a $200 saddle for 89 days and sends it back...no way in hell. No...just...no.

I wonder what happens to used saddles? Write off? Bio-hazard disposal? Showroom discount bin?
 

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