A Dial-Gauge Bicycle Wheel Building Stand for $100



L

LF

Guest
This article describes how to assemble an inexpensive, but very
accurate, wheel building stand for bicycles. The stand uses a dial
gauge indicator that is accurate to 1/1000th of an inch, but the
complete stand can be finished for about $100.... <snip>

LINK: <http://tinyurl.com/2ald2u>

What do you think?

Best,
Larry
 
On Sat, 8 Dec 2007 13:09:51 -0800 (PST), LF <[email protected]> wrote:

>This article describes how to assemble an inexpensive, but very
>accurate, wheel building stand for bicycles. The stand uses a dial
>gauge indicator that is accurate to 1/1000th of an inch, but the
>complete stand can be finished for about $100.... <snip>
>
>LINK: <http://tinyurl.com/2ald2u>
>
>What do you think?
>
>Best,
>Larry


Dear Larry,

It's harmless, apart from the time and fuss involved.

But any tire mounted on the rim will vary considerably more than 0.005
and even 0.002 inches in roundness and trueness mentioned on that
page. So will any surface that you ride on.

The thin paper in a phone book is about 0.002 inches thick.

The thick paper in a hardback book is about 0.005 inches thick.

So I suspect that the inventor is imagining things when he says that
"Wheels with this accuracy ride nicely," the implication being that
they ride noticeably differently than less perfectly trued wheels.

In fact, as long as the brake pads don't rub, it's unlikely that
anyone can tell the difference by just riding around on reasonably
true wheels.

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
 
On Dec 8, 3:09 pm, LF <[email protected]> wrote:
> This article describes how to assemble an inexpensive, but very
> accurate, wheel building stand for bicycles. The stand uses a dial
> gauge indicator that is accurate to 1/1000th of an inch, but the
> complete stand can be finished for about $100.... <snip>
>
> LINK: <http://tinyurl.com/2ald2u>
>
> What do you think?
>
> Best,
> Larry


With all due respect here, a wheel can be trued on the bicycle.

All you really need is a dishing tool, the right glasses (when you get
to my age) and some patience.

Oh, one other thing, having the correct sized spoke wrench might
reduce the amount of patience you will need.

Lewis.

*****
 
C

Chalo

Guest
Carl Fogel wrote:
>
> Larry wrote:
> >
> >This article describes how to assemble an inexpensive, but very
> >accurate, wheel building stand for bicycles. The stand uses a dial
> >gauge indicator that is accurate to 1/1000th of an inch, but the
> >complete stand can be finished for about $100.... <snip>
> >
> >LINK: <http://tinyurl.com/2ald2u>
> >
> >What do you think?

>
> It's harmless, apart from the time and fuss involved.
>
> But any tire mounted on the rim will vary considerably more than 0.005
> and even 0.002 inches in roundness and trueness mentioned on that
> page. So will any surface that you ride on.


A dial indicator runout gauge for wheel truing confers one nice
benefit that has nothing to do with absolute precision. It pinpoints
the apex of a bump in the rim, making it easier to determine which
spoke will most directly address the problem. The feelers on a Park
stand can do this too, with auditory rather than numerical feedback.
The brake pads on my bikes are not as good in this regard. The tip of
my thumb held alongside a rim that has no corresponding rim brake is
even less effective. Yet I find that it's often more than good enough
for the job.

I've never felt a need to use a dial indicator to true a rim, though
I've often used one to set up or straighten a workpiece or align a
machine tool in the shop.

Chalo
 
D

datakoll

Guest
On Dec 9, 9:00 am, datakoll <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Dec 9, 8:56 am, datakoll <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >http://www.zymetrical.com/images/products/shock-magic-marker.jpg

>
> > is the dial gauge pleasant in use?
> > or is the DG another PITA?
> > how long (baby how long) does a dial gauge last?

>
> allow me a rephrase:
> if you give a dial guage to a monkey
> will the monkey break it?


http://www.zymetrical.com/images/products/shock-magic-marker.jpg

cutting and pasting "BEADY'S DIY ORBITAL TOURISM ROCKET" is unfair
but humbug is in this season.
"With some practice, you can build or adjust wheels to within +/- .005
inches, for both roundness and trueness" oh good.
Sure: first train your eyes...
"The low price is achieved by using": GARBAGE! particle board? .060?
5 screws? Is this iconic?
You can also use any other wheel stand you might already have, as long
as it has mounting holes on the bottom." SWIPE YOUR BUDDY'S LONG HAUL
TRUCKER AND CUT THE REAR TRIANGLE OUT!
"You should perform all initial steps of wheel building and
adjustments without the dial gauge" initial steps? Like running the
wheel into an 8buh pothole?
Lookit the photos. Why not dangle the DG from the ceiling with fishing
line? Makes you weep, no?
Jus take the rear triangle, bolt it's Seat Post to a tubah4 bolted to
(if you can see by this stage) 3/4" plywood (painted flat white), mount
the wheel then figure how to bolt angle iron (from cast off bed
mattress frames) off the ply to hold the DG.
That beats 100 bucks. Scrounge dude scrounge.
And don't forget the magic markers in different colors. Also tape,
clear and black: for the spokes ends of bend, center of bend.
Merry xmas!
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
datakoll aka gene daniels wrote:
>
> bolt to ahtubah2 not tubah4


gene will revolutionize the pre-cut lumber industry!

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter
 
D

datakoll

Guest
On Dec 9, 9:40 am, Tom Sherman <[email protected]>
wrote:
> datakoll aka gene daniels wrote:
>
>
>
> > bolt to ahtubah2 not tubah4

>
> gene will revolutionize the pre-cut lumber industry!
>
> --
> Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
> "Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
> differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
> excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter


that is the lumber industry, 5/4
 
D

datakoll

Guest
yah don't spring for the douglas fir tubah2
find a surveyor's stake, used skid board or furrinstrip
ask the nab's gyro for one. Heees gottem stal]ked in the gahraj
 
L

Leo Lichtman

Guest
A dial gauge might make the final stages of truing more precise, but it is
far too sensitive for most of the job--the needle will swing all over the
place.
 
C

Chalo

Guest
datakoll wrote:
>
> is the dial gauge pleasant in use?
> or is the DG another PITA?
> how long (baby how long) does a dial gauge last?


I like 'em. Depending on the design of the stand, it could be a
hassle. I saw a truing stand once that was one-sided-- basically you
bolted or QR'ed your wheel to the stand. That would be good for a
travel indicator type dial gauge like the one at issue. In a regular
stand, it would be pretty easy to bash the plunger with the wheel.
You'd have to remember to get the instrument clear whenever the wheel
was mounted or removed.

Dial indicators are long-lived creatures. I believe I've used some
that were older than me, anyway. But you do have to keep them away
from monkeys 'cause they're sensitive like that.

Chalo
 
D

datakoll

Guest
ah said a nick iszah nickel ah dime isah dime
I'll take a magic marker evrah time
baby how out of true rrrrr you
broooing!

^&%^$#!!
 
On Sun, 9 Dec 2007 12:31:37 -0800 (PST), Chalo
<[email protected]> wrote:

>datakoll wrote:
>>
>> is the dial gauge pleasant in use?
>> or is the DG another PITA?
>> how long (baby how long) does a dial gauge last?

>
>I like 'em. Depending on the design of the stand, it could be a
>hassle. I saw a truing stand once that was one-sided-- basically you
>bolted or QR'ed your wheel to the stand. That would be good for a
>travel indicator type dial gauge like the one at issue. In a regular
>stand, it would be pretty easy to bash the plunger with the wheel.
>You'd have to remember to get the instrument clear whenever the wheel
>was mounted or removed.
>
>Dial indicators are long-lived creatures. I believe I've used some
>that were older than me, anyway. But you do have to keep them away
>from monkeys 'cause they're sensitive like that.
>
>Chalo


Dear Chalo,

Fully adjustable, clearly marked, fairly sturdy, nicely decorated:


http://www.nostalgic.net/index.asp?S=arc/pre1920/Trueing+stand+1.jpg


http://www.nostalgic.net/index.asp?S=arc/pre1920/Trueing+stand+2.jpg


http://www.nostalgic.net/index.asp?S=arc/pre1920/Trueing+stand+3.jpg

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
 
D

datakoll

Guest
awwwwwww 1) if you can break it, don't loan it to your friend the
monkey
2) always loan tools to a man (or monkey)who owns more tools
than you.
3) always loan tools to a man (or monkey) who knows good
looking women with money
4) never loan an heirloom tool unless its life or death AND
THEN ONLY WITH SUPERVISION OR DEPOSIT

THE LIST IS ENDLESS

i know several good stories on this subject, none printable.
 
T

Tom Sherman

Guest
Andrew Muzi wrote:
>> datakoll <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> http://www.zymetrical.com/images/products/shock-magic-marker.jpg
>>> is the dial gauge pleasant in use?
>>> or is the DG another PITA?
>>> how long (baby how long) does a dial gauge last?

>> allow me a rephrase:
>> if you give a dial guage to a monkey
>> will the monkey break it?

>
> One of the important Rules for Life is "Don't Loan Tools".


And "Don't Hire Monkeys"?

--
Tom Sherman - Holstein-Friesland Bovinia
"Localized intense suction such as tornadoes is created when temperature
differences are high enough between meeting air masses, and can impart
excessive energy onto a cyclist." - Randy Schlitter