a dog story...

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Alan, Feb 12, 2003.

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  1. Alan

    Alan Guest

    I was riding home from work today when I crossed in front of a shiny new Corvette at a side street.
    It sat there with windows darker than my ex-wife's soul, so I couldn't make eye contact with the
    driver. I couldn't even SEE the driver. And of course, just as I was about to pass in front of it,
    it started moving. The pretty young blonde woman at the wheel was seriously perturbed that I had
    magically appeared in front of her, timed as it was to impede her forward progress, ruin her day,
    make her late for an important appointment - whatever. She let me know this by giving the one
    fingered salute and flooring it.

    I shrugged it off and went on down the road.

    A mile or so further on, I spotted a miniature Doberman in a yard with a woman. The dog spotted me
    at about the same time, started snarling and barking, and made a dash for the road. I was moving
    fast, but not sprinting, as the dog chased up the road behind me. The woman yelled for the dog to
    come back, then started yelling at ME to stop so she could recover the mutt!

    Now I don't know about you, but I'm wary of any dog capable of biting, and I'm even wary of small
    dogs that can get tangled up with my wheels. It happened last year. Two small dogs came out to chase
    me, and I actually ran over one of them.

    But this woman wanted me to stop, turn around, and lure her dog back to her loving arms. If I were
    to be bitten while performing this humanitarian act, well, that's too bad. Instead, I kept moving.
    My thought was that controlling her dog wasn't MY responsibility - it was hers. And if she wouldn't
    train the dog properly, again, that's not my responsibility.

    So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?

    --

    alan

    Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    You probably should go rent a vibrator roller and go squash the little yapping POS and put it out of
    your misery.

    Hey, I'm finally getting this! Oops, that vitriolic stuff usually gets put on r.b.racing. Wrong NG.

    Seriously, if you feel that you're about to get bitten, let her deal with the dog herself. I
    actually have a pair of dogs at my parents that will run next to me and bark when I'm riding the
    bike (motorized or pedal) in the yard. I KNOW that they're not going to bite, so I have fun with
    them. Someone else's dog, like my little brother from Wilmington's, is another story as evidenced by
    the marks of his dog's 4 canine teeth on my right calf. Best not to tempt fate. Being bitten HURTS!

    Mike

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was riding home from work today when I crossed in front of a shiny new Corvette at a side
    > street. It sat there with windows darker than my ex-wife's soul, so I couldn't make eye contact
    > with the driver. I
    couldn't
    > even SEE the driver. And of course, just as I was about to pass in front
    of
    > it, it started moving. The pretty young blonde woman at the wheel was seriously perturbed that I
    > had magically appeared in front of her, timed
    as
    > it was to impede her forward progress, ruin her day, make her late for an important appointment -
    > whatever. She let me know this by giving the one fingered salute and flooring it.
    >
    > I shrugged it off and went on down the road.
    >
    > A mile or so further on, I spotted a miniature Doberman in a yard with a woman. The dog spotted me
    > at about the same time, started snarling and barking, and made a dash for the road. I was moving
    > fast, but not sprinting, as the dog chased up the road behind me. The woman yelled for the dog to
    > come back, then started yelling at ME to stop so she could recover the mutt!
    >
    > Now I don't know about you, but I'm wary of any dog capable of biting, and I'm even wary of small
    > dogs that can get tangled up with my wheels. It happened last year. Two small dogs came out to
    > chase me, and I actually
    ran
    > over one of them.
    >
    > But this woman wanted me to stop, turn around, and lure her dog back to
    her
    > loving arms. If I were to be bitten while performing this humanitarian
    act,
    > well, that's too bad. Instead, I kept moving. My thought was that controlling her dog wasn't MY
    > responsibility - it was hers. And if she wouldn't train the dog properly, again, that's not my
    > responsibility.
    >
    > So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > alan
    >
    > Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily
    Oklahoman."
     
  3. Edward Dike

    Edward Dike Guest

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | I was riding home from work today when I crossed in front of a shiny new Corvette at a side
    | street. It sat there with windows darker than my ex-wife's soul, so I couldn't make eye contact
    | with the driver. I
    couldn't
    | even SEE the driver. And of course, just as I was about to pass in front
    of
    | it, it started moving. The pretty young blonde woman at the wheel was seriously perturbed that I
    | had magically appeared in front of her, timed
    as
    | it was to impede her forward progress, ruin her day, make her late for an important appointment -
    | whatever. She let me know this by giving the one fingered salute and flooring it.
    |
    | I shrugged it off and went on down the road.
    |
    | A mile or so further on, I spotted a miniature Doberman in a yard with a woman. The dog spotted me
    | at about the same time, started snarling and barking, and made a dash for the road. I was moving
    | fast, but not sprinting, as the dog chased up the road behind me. The woman yelled for the dog to
    | come back, then started yelling at ME to stop so she could recover the mutt!
    |
    | Now I don't know about you, but I'm wary of any dog capable of biting, and I'm even wary of small
    | dogs that can get tangled up with my wheels. It happened last year. Two small dogs came out to
    | chase me, and I actually
    ran
    | over one of them.
    |
    | But this woman wanted me to stop, turn around, and lure her dog back to
    her
    | loving arms. If I were to be bitten while performing this humanitarian
    act,
    | well, that's too bad. Instead, I kept moving. My thought was that controlling her dog wasn't MY
    | responsibility - it was hers. And if she wouldn't train the dog properly, again, that's not my
    | responsibility.
    |
    | So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?
    |
    |
    |
    |
    | --
    |
    | alan
    |
    | Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily
    Oklahoman."
    |
    |
    As a former dog owner, I might stop if I felt safe(from the dog), and there was a chance the dog
    might stray into traffic, however, I wouldn't have stopped for that one, as I have some past
    experiences with the the breed, none good.

    And I am confused: "... It sat there with windows darker than my
    | ex-wife's soul, so I couldn't make eye contact with the driver. I
    couldn't
    | even SEE the driver...." vs . "...The pretty young blonde woman at the
    wheel ..."

    ED3
     
  4. "alan" <[email protected]> spake thusly on or about Thu, 13 Feb 2003 03:49:47 UTC

    -> So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of -> the little beastie?

    should have slowed enough to return the miniture pincher with a polo like stroke of your frame pump

    --
    I hurt before the ride so fibro gives me a head start on the rest of the pack. silver lining?
    [email protected]
     
  5. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?

    Cue Ron Hardin

    Pete
     
  6. schikerbiker

    schikerbiker Guest

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?

    You were right for continuing. I also carry HALT within easy reach just in case...that will make any
    dog stop for a few minutes. It also teaches them not to go after bikes. If the same dog causes
    problems more than once, I call animal control.
     
  7. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?

    I think you did the best thing, what you were comfortable with and what was reasonable under the
    circumstances. I would be pretty sure this is not the first time this dog has gotten loose and
    chased someone.

    If you wanted to do the lady a favor, you might have waited until she rounded the beast up and gone
    back and let her know that being chased by a dog can be a rather harrowing experience and you would
    hope that she keeps the dog under control.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  8. Pbwalther

    Pbwalther Guest

    >But this woman wanted me to stop, turn around, and lure her dog back to her loving arms. If I were
    >to be bitten while performing this humanitarian act, well, that's too bad. Instead, I kept moving.
    >My thought was that controlling her dog wasn't MY responsibility - it was hers. And if she wouldn't
    >train the dog properly, again, that's not my responsibility.
    >
    >So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >--
    >
    >alan
    >
    >Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily Oklahoman."
    >
    >
    Well, I can't count the number of times that I have ridden by yards and seen dogs and their owners
    standing there. The dog would show interest in me as a target and the owner would say in a sort of
    whining voice (like the French to Sadaam Hussain) "don't chase the bike" and the dog would be after
    me like a shot. Something about an ineffectual admonition really goads dogs on. I also think that
    dog's show less good sense around ineffectual owners then normal.

    In this case, there is no way I would have stopped. The woman can round up her own errant pooch.
    Remember the saying - poor planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on my part. Even
    a small dog can deliver a very painful bite if it really wants to. And even a friendly small dog
    can get under you wheel and cause you to crash and suffer serious injuries. Besides just how were
    you planning on rounding up a dog with those bike shoes on? I would have trouble catching a one
    legged duck in my look cleats. I can catch a tortose though (and have). Look on the bright side of
    things, the woman probably got some needed exercise and who knows, maybe she will even get a leash
    for her pooch.
     
  9. Ben Kaufman

    Ben Kaufman Guest

    On Thu, 13 Feb 2003 03:49:47 GMT, "alan" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?

    Absolutely. It would have been another story if it was a playful dog.

    Plus, I can reasonably assure you that this is not the first time this dog has ran out of the yard
    to chase something. I feel sorry for the dog, which will eventually get clocked, that it's negligent
    owner is not restraining it for its own safety.

    Ben
     
  10. Oregon Gyrl

    Oregon Gyrl Guest

    If I know for a fact that I can outrun the dog, I stay just barely ahead of it and taunt it. I had a
    pesky dog follow me almost 1/2 mile once. Then you can turn around and chase it if it's small enough
    and watch it run for it's life. For the other dogs, I carry a sock with a couple of old D cell
    batteries in
    it. A shot with this to the head usually knocks them senseless for a few minutes and after a few
    times they just bark when I come by.
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, "alan"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was riding home from work today when I crossed in front of a shiny new Corvette at a side
    > street. It sat there with windows darker than my ex-wife's soul, so I couldn't make eye contact
    > with the driver. I couldn't even SEE the driver. And of course, just as I was about to pass in
    > front of it, it started moving. The pretty young blonde woman at the wheel was seriously perturbed
    > that I had magically appeared in front of her, timed as it was to impede her forward progress,
    > ruin her day, make her late for an important appointment - whatever. She let me know this by
    > giving the one fingered salute and flooring it.
    >
    > I shrugged it off and went on down the road.
    >
    > A mile or so further on, I spotted a miniature Doberman in a yard with a woman. The dog spotted me
    > at about the same time, started snarling and barking, and made a dash for the road. I was moving
    > fast, but not sprinting, as the dog chased up the road behind me. The woman yelled for the dog to
    > come back, then started yelling at ME to stop so she could recover the mutt!
    >
    > Now I don't know about you, but I'm wary of any dog capable of biting, and I'm even wary of small
    > dogs that can get tangled up with my wheels. It happened last year. Two small dogs came out to
    > chase me, and I actually ran over one of them.
    >
    > But this woman wanted me to stop, turn around, and lure her dog back to her loving arms. If I were
    > to be bitten while performing this humanitarian act, well, that's too bad. Instead, I kept moving.
    > My thought was that controlling her dog wasn't MY responsibility - it was hers. And if she
    > wouldn't train the dog properly, again, that's not my responsibility.
    >
    > So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?
    >

    NO way! IF the stupid cow is incapable of restraining the dog, tough shit for her- you have your
    safety to think of. I love dogs and hate to think of one getting hurt, but so many owners are so
    clueless. They think nothing bad will ever happen to their dog. And the worst thing is that these
    people often have kids!
     
  12. It certainly isn't your responsibility to look after someone elses and there certainly was nothing
    wrong with you continuing on. I'm not a particular fan of dogs. However, I like to be friendly and
    helpful when I can, if I had the time I probably would have stopped.

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was riding home from work today when I crossed in front of a shiny new Corvette at a side
    > street. It sat there with windows darker than my ex-wife's soul, so I couldn't make eye contact
    > with the driver. I
    couldn't
    > even SEE the driver. And of course, just as I was about to pass in front
    of
    > it, it started moving. The pretty young blonde woman at the wheel was seriously perturbed that I
    > had magically appeared in front of her, timed
    as
    > it was to impede her forward progress, ruin her day, make her late for an important appointment -
    > whatever. She let me know this by giving the one fingered salute and flooring it.
    >
    > I shrugged it off and went on down the road.
    >
    > A mile or so further on, I spotted a miniature Doberman in a yard with a woman. The dog spotted me
    > at about the same time, started snarling and barking, and made a dash for the road. I was moving
    > fast, but not sprinting, as the dog chased up the road behind me. The woman yelled for the dog to
    > come back, then started yelling at ME to stop so she could recover the mutt!
    >
    > Now I don't know about you, but I'm wary of any dog capable of biting,
    and
    > I'm even wary of small dogs that can get tangled up with my wheels. It happened last year. Two
    > small dogs came out to chase me, and I actually
    ran
    > over one of them.
    >
    > But this woman wanted me to stop, turn around, and lure her dog back to
    her
    > loving arms. If I were to be bitten while performing this humanitarian
    act,
    > well, that's too bad. Instead, I kept moving. My thought was that controlling her dog wasn't MY
    > responsibility - it was hers. And if she wouldn't train the dog properly, again, that's not my
    > responsibility.
    >
    > So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws
    of
    > the little beastie?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > alan
    >
    > Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily
    Oklahoman."
     
  13. Zwieback

    Zwieback Guest

    On Thu, 13 Feb 2003 09:36:51 -0700, "Oregon Gyrl" <[email protected]> from wrote:

    >For the other dogs, I carry a sock with a couple of old D cell batteries in
    >it. A shot with this to the head usually knocks them senseless for a few minutes and after a few
    > times they just bark when I come by.

    Have you tried spraying them with water from your bottle instead? Or, instead of the batteries,
    perhaps you could fill your sock with dried beans. A sock filled with batteries could easily land a
    fatal blow to even the largest dog. Bad dogs may deserve some remedial education, but not capital
    punishment.
    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace My life is a patio of fun!
    2:22:22 PM 13 February 2003
     
  14. Max

    Max Guest

    "ZwieBack" <[email protected]/\/\> wrote

    >. Bad dogs may deserve some remedial education, but not capital punishment.

    i'm not entirely sure i agree. I'm attacked the same bad dog, several times, on my commutes to/from
    work. This dog is going for blood; i've felt its teeth on my ankle. I've repeatedly smacked it ,
    _hard_ , on the end of the nose with the ball of my foot, but still it comes.

    I'm close to dismounting, killing it bare-handed and leaving its carcass beside the road with a
    water bottle jammed up its ass, although i suppose i'll first try pepperspray. 8-(

    The irrititing part is it has no collar, no tag and is running freely through the neighborhood and
    only attacks late at night.

    .max
     
  15. Dogs always stop chasing you when you leave their territory. The trick is to make it to that border
    before you get bit. F-k the lady. Anyway you prefer, but I suppose you hadn't forgotten the
    Corvette yet.

    --
    Replace the dots to reply

    Perre

    "alan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was riding home from work today when I crossed in front of a shiny new Corvette at a side
    > street. It sat there with windows darker than my ex-wife's soul, so I couldn't make eye contact
    > with the driver. I
    couldn't
    > even SEE the driver. And of course, just as I was about to pass in front
    of
    > it, it started moving. The pretty young blonde woman at the wheel was seriously perturbed that I
    > had magically appeared in front of her, timed
    as
    > it was to impede her forward progress, ruin her day, make her late for an important appointment -
    > whatever. She let me know this by giving the one fingered salute and flooring it.
    >
    > I shrugged it off and went on down the road.
    >
    > A mile or so further on, I spotted a miniature Doberman in a yard with a woman. The dog spotted me
    > at about the same time, started snarling and barking, and made a dash for the road. I was moving
    > fast, but not sprinting, as the dog chased up the road behind me. The woman yelled for the dog to
    > come back, then started yelling at ME to stop so she could recover the mutt!
    >
    > Now I don't know about you, but I'm wary of any dog capable of biting, and I'm even wary of small
    > dogs that can get tangled up with my wheels. It happened last year. Two small dogs came out to
    > chase me, and I actually
    ran
    > over one of them.
    >
    > But this woman wanted me to stop, turn around, and lure her dog back to
    her
    > loving arms. If I were to be bitten while performing this humanitarian
    act,
    > well, that's too bad. Instead, I kept moving. My thought was that controlling her dog wasn't MY
    > responsibility - it was hers. And if she wouldn't train the dog properly, again, that's not my
    > responsibility.
    >
    > So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > alan
    >
    > Anyone who believes in a liberal media has never read the "Daily
    Oklahoman."
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    >So was it right to continue, or should I have turned back into the jaws of the little beastie?

    You made the decision that was right for you, but I would have stopped and kept the bike between me
    and mini doberman. I would hate to see any dog hit by a car, even if it is the owners fault for not
    controlling their dog properly.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  17. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    Bingo. You can't blame a dog for biting. Blame the owner for not being responsible. However, there
    is a distinct progression toward a lack or responsiblity for anyone these days..it's always someone
    else's fault. Cheers!

    Scott..
    --
    Scott Anderson

    "Ben Kaufman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Thu, 13 Feb 2003 03:49:47 GMT, "alan" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    > Plus, I can reasonably assure you that this is not the first time this
    dog has
    > ran out of the yard to chase something. I feel sorry for the dog, which
    will
    > eventually get clocked, that it's negligent owner is not restraining it
    for its
    > own safety.
    >
    > Ben
     
  18. Zwieback

    Zwieback Guest

    On Thu, 13 Feb 2003 15:31:56 -0600, "max" <[email protected]> from what does THIS button
    do?! wrote:

    >i'm not entirely sure i agree. I'm attacked the same bad dog, several times, on my commutes to/from
    >work. This dog is going for blood; i've felt its teeth on my ankle. I've repeatedly smacked it ,
    >_hard_ , on the end of the nose with the ball of my foot, but still it comes.
    >
    >I'm close to dismounting, killing it bare-handed and leaving its carcass beside the road with a
    >water bottle jammed up its ass, although i suppose i'll first try pepperspray. 8-(
    >
    >The irrititing part is it has no collar, no tag and is running freely through the neighborhood and
    >only attacks late at night.

    This is a job for your local animal control people. They have the tools and the training and the
    authority to do the job properly. Some dogs do need to be put down, and the one you describe may be
    one of them.

    --
    http://home.sport.rr.com/cuthulu/ human rights = peace HUGH BEAUMONT died in 1982!!
    4:48:24 PM 13 February 2003
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >
    >"ZwieBack" <[email protected]/\/\> wrote
    >
    >>. Bad dogs may deserve some remedial education, but not capital punishment.
    >
    >
    >i'm not entirely sure i agree. I'm attacked the same bad dog, several times, on my commutes to/from
    >work. This dog is going for blood; i've felt its teeth on my ankle. I've repeatedly smacked it ,
    >_hard_ , on the end of the nose with the ball of my foot, but still it comes.
    >
    >I'm close to dismounting, killing it bare-handed and leaving its carcass beside the road with a
    >water bottle jammed up its ass, although i suppose i'll first try pepperspray. 8-(
    >
    >The irrititing part is it has no collar, no tag and is running freely through the neighborhood and
    >only attacks late at night.

    Call your local animal control officer.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  20. "Oregon Gyrl" <[email protected]> wrote in news:qGP2a.3112$%[email protected]:

    > If I know for a fact that I can outrun the dog, I stay just barely ahead of it and taunt it. I had
    > a pesky dog follow me almost 1/2 mile once. Then you can turn around and chase it if it's small
    > enough and watch it run for it's life. For the other dogs, I carry a sock with a couple of old D
    > cell batteries in it. A shot with this to the head usually knocks them senseless for a few minutes
    > and after a few times they just bark when I come by.
    >
    >
    Alternatively you can cleverly lure them out into traffic and let nature take its course, but make
    sure your get the blonde girl's telephone number....you never know.
     
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