A good casual road shoe?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Jeff Potter, Jul 8, 2003.

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  1. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    When I look at bike shoes offered today I see:

    *aggro mtb shoes--heavy with huge cleats, race-styling *slick road shoes--rigid soles unsuited for
    walking, race-styling

    Hello?

    Can anyone give me a pointer to a bunch of decent all-round bike shoes?

    I guess you'd call them touring shoes. This should be a whole huge category, right? But I can't seem
    to find it.

    I'd think the demographics on who would need race-style shoes or aggro/rigid-slick soles would be
    about 10% of the riding population with 90% of riders needing a quality good-looking all-round shoe.
    So I guess I'm missing whole stores offering bike shoes for the masses.

    A few years back I bought a pair of Nike Pedali Combo's. They've been great. However, it looks like
    they don't make em 'good' like my model anymore. I see what seems like info on two different
    Pedalis---they say they're made for touring, like mine, (and spinning, har) but the photo I saw
    looks HEAVY and CLUNKY like a MTB shoe with massive rubber sole/knobs. I also see reviews saying the
    sole is slick and hard. There's a clash here. But neither indicate a real touring shoe. The model I
    bought 5+ yrs ago is LIGHT, TRIM, has a firm, proper cycling sole which is not too rigid with a
    modest amount of rubber traction on the bottom. It's very comfy for walking. It also looks great:
    it's a dark green with purple accent. Understated yet attractive. I did note that the year after I
    bought mine they botched that next year's model by making it all black. It looks like they've
    further ruined this model at this point.

    I see that Performance sells a couple Shimano Touring shoes. Still too racey/geeky. Oh well. They
    also have a clunky Lake.

    I see that the UK offers the Carnac and Time touring shoes. There's a lady's Avocet. They're all
    ugly: oldstyle, 70's-groovy or race-styled. But that's the UK.

    Slim pickins.

    --

    Jeff Potter
    ****
    *Out Your Backdoor * http://www.outyourbackdoor.com for modern folkways and culture revival...
    ...offering "small world" views on bikes, bows, books, movies... ...new books featuring: XC ski
    culture, a Gulf Coast thriller folding bicycles ... with radical novels coming up! ...original
    downloadable music ... and articles galore! plus national "Off the Beaten Path" travel forums!
    HOLY SMOKES!
     
    Tags:


  2. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Tue, 08 Jul 2003 13:28:54 -0400, Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Can anyone give me a pointer to a bunch of decent all-round bike shoes?

    Shimano makes a touring shoe. The model designation on mint it T091. By now, I'd guess they are T092
    or T093. The work fine for touring.
     
  3. Grenouil

    Grenouil Guest

    "Jeff Potter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When I look at bike shoes offered today I see:
    >
    > *aggro mtb shoes--heavy with huge cleats, race-styling *slick road shoes--rigid soles unsuited for
    > walking, race-styling
    >
    > Hello?
    >
    > Can anyone give me a pointer to a bunch of decent all-round bike shoes?
    >
    > I guess you'd call them touring shoes. This should be a whole huge category, right? But I can't
    > seem to find it.
    >
    .........

    Diadora Voyager....
     
  4. Pete Grey

    Pete Grey Guest

    The Shimano MO36 (replaced by the MO37 this year) is EXACTLY what you're looking for, IMO :-]

    I have used them extensively for loaded touring, work well for both riding and walking, and they're
    not terribly heavy.

    -pete

    "Jeff Potter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > When I look at bike shoes offered today I see:
    >
    > *aggro mtb shoes--heavy with huge cleats, race-styling *slick road shoes--rigid soles unsuited for
    > walking, race-styling
    >
    > Hello?
    >
    > Can anyone give me a pointer to a bunch of decent all-round bike shoes?
    >
    > I guess you'd call them touring shoes. This should be a whole huge category, right? But I can't
    > seem to find it.
    >
    > I'd think the demographics on who would need race-style shoes or aggro/rigid-slick soles would be
    > about 10% of the riding population with 90% of riders needing a quality good-looking all-round
    > shoe. So I guess I'm missing whole stores offering bike shoes for the masses.
    >
    > A few years back I bought a pair of Nike Pedali Combo's. They've been great. However, it looks
    > like they don't make em 'good' like my model anymore. I see what seems like info on two different
    > Pedalis---they say they're made for touring, like mine, (and spinning, har) but the photo I saw
    > looks HEAVY and CLUNKY like a MTB shoe with massive rubber sole/knobs. I also see reviews saying
    > the sole is slick and hard. There's a clash here. But neither indicate a real touring shoe. The
    > model I bought 5+ yrs ago is LIGHT, TRIM, has a firm, proper cycling sole which is not too rigid
    > with a modest amount of rubber traction on the bottom. It's very comfy for walking. It also looks
    > great: it's a dark green with purple accent. Understated yet attractive. I did note that the year
    > after I bought mine they botched that next year's model by making it all black. It looks like
    > they've further ruined this model at this point.
    >
    > I see that Performance sells a couple Shimano Touring shoes. Still too racey/geeky. Oh well. They
    > also have a clunky Lake.
    >
    > I see that the UK offers the Carnac and Time touring shoes. There's a lady's Avocet. They're all
    > ugly: oldstyle, 70's-groovy or race-styled. But that's the UK.
    >
    > Slim pickins.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Jeff Potter
    > ****
    > *Out Your Backdoor * http://www.outyourbackdoor.com for modern folkways and culture revival...
    > ...offering "small world" views on bikes, bows, books, movies... ...new books featuring: XC ski
    > culture, a Gulf Coast thriller folding bicycles ... with radical novels coming up! ...original
    > downloadable music ... and articles galore! plus national "Off the Beaten Path" travel forums!
    > HOLY SMOKES!
     
  5. Martyn Aldis

    Martyn Aldis Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Jeff Potter
    <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >I guess you'd call them touring shoes. This should be a whole huge category, right? But I can't
    >seem to find it.
    >
    >
    >I see that Performance sells a couple Shimano Touring shoes. Still too racey/geeky. Oh well. They
    >also have a clunky Lake.

    I've just got some Shimano SH-TO70s and like them.

    From what you say, you might not like the look (you care about look?). They're not as loud as road
    race shoes but still a bit odd with little reflective stud things that look a tiny bit sinister,
    like delicate little biker's jacket studs.

    Getting away from the look and assuming you plan to ride in these things, get the right stiffness to
    go with the type of pedals you use. I use spd pedals that don't have a cage around and my old
    cheapest of the range Shimano trainer style shoes (MO 30s I think) didn't give enough foot support
    away from the cleat leaving my feet pounded after 30miles or so. The TO70s have a thicker and
    stiffer rubber sole so they spread the load better but are a bit stiff and curved for walking far.

    Just where do you want to balance the compromise? I'll still use the old trainer type for short
    utility trips.
    >
    >I see that the UK offers the Carnac and Time touring shoes. There's a lady's Avocet. They're all
    >ugly: oldstyle, 70's-groovy or race-styled. But that's the UK.
    >
    Surprised if Time make a dull shoe just for the UK or any shoe for that matter. I suppose they must
    do some specific designs to match national foot sizes and how much cash there is to splash.

    Martyn

    Martyn Aldis
     
  6. Andres Muro

    Andres Muro Guest

    I think that the Sidi mountain shoe is very good. It is expensive but has a good fit. Especially the
    one with the racheting thingy. They are the lightest mtb shoe. The MTb shoe is still one of the
    lightest road shoes, and you can walk in them. the road shoe is even lighter but you cannot walk,
    so, to me, it is useless.

    The MTB shoe is exactly the same as thew road shoe, but with a walking sole attached to it. I can
    drive to a ride, ride, and have lunch after the ride with a bunch of roadies in the same, lighter
    than most, sidi shoes. Not that I think that weight makes a difference, but they are comfortable,
    long lasting, and you can walk on them. Light weight is free icing.

    Andres

    Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > When I look at bike shoes offered today I see:
    >
    > *aggro mtb shoes--heavy with huge cleats, race-styling *slick road shoes--rigid soles unsuited for
    > walking, race-styling
    >
    > Hello?
    >
    > Can anyone give me a pointer to a bunch of decent all-round bike shoes?
    >
    > I guess you'd call them touring shoes. This should be a whole huge category, right? But I can't
    > seem to find it.
    >
    > I'd think the demographics on who would need race-style shoes or aggro/rigid-slick soles would be
    > about 10% of the riding population with 90% of riders needing a quality good-looking all-round
    > shoe. So I guess I'm missing whole stores offering bike shoes for the masses.
    >
    > A few years back I bought a pair of Nike Pedali Combo's. They've been great. However, it looks
    > like they don't make em 'good' like my model anymore. I see what seems like info on two different
    > Pedalis---they say they're made for touring, like mine, (and spinning, har) but the photo I saw
    > looks HEAVY and CLUNKY like a MTB shoe with massive rubber sole/knobs. I also see reviews saying
    > the sole is slick and hard. There's a clash here. But neither indicate a real touring shoe. The
    > model I bought 5+ yrs ago is LIGHT, TRIM, has a firm, proper cycling sole which is not too rigid
    > with a modest amount of rubber traction on the bottom. It's very comfy for walking. It also looks
    > great: it's a dark green with purple accent. Understated yet attractive. I did note that the year
    > after I bought mine they botched that next year's model by making it all black. It looks like
    > they've further ruined this model at this point.
    >
    > I see that Performance sells a couple Shimano Touring shoes. Still too racey/geeky. Oh well. They
    > also have a clunky Lake.
    >
    > I see that the UK offers the Carnac and Time touring shoes. There's a lady's Avocet. They're all
    > ugly: oldstyle, 70's-groovy or race-styled. But that's the UK.
    >
    > Slim pickins.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Jeff Potter
    > ****
    > *Out Your Backdoor * http://www.outyourbackdoor.com for modern folkways and culture revival...
    > ...offering "small world" views on bikes, bows, books, movies... ...new books featuring: XC ski
    > culture, a Gulf Coast thriller folding bicycles ... with radical novels coming up! ...original
    > downloadable music ... and articles galore! plus national "Off the Beaten Path" travel forums!
    > HOLY SMOKES!
     
  7. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    Thanks for the tips. None of these seem like very good touring shoes, but some are pretty close. The
    Sidi MTB probably has an overly 'aggro' look with huge rubber cleats on it. I saw some Shimanos but
    missed seeing the MO's---they seem a little 'gortexy' in style. It just seems like the makers
    haven't tried very hard to please the MODERATES who need a good style as much as anyone.

    --

    Jeff Potter
    ****
    *Out Your Backdoor * http://www.outyourbackdoor.com for modern folkways and culture revival...
    ...offering "small world" views on bikes, bows, books, movies... ...new books featuring: XC ski
    culture, a Gulf Coast thriller folding bicycles ... with radical novels coming up! ...original
    downloadable music ... and articles galore! plus national "Off the Beaten Path" travel forums!
    HOLY SMOKES!
     
  8. Andrew Lee

    Andrew Lee Guest

    "andres muro" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I think that the Sidi mountain shoe is very good. It is expensive but has a good fit. Especially
    > the one with the racheting thingy. They are the lightest mtb shoe. The MTb shoe is still one of
    > the lightest road shoes, and you can walk in them. the road shoe is even lighter but you cannot
    > walk, so, to me, it is useless.
    >
    > The MTB shoe is exactly the same as thew road shoe, but with a walking sole attached to it. I can
    > drive to a ride, ride, and have lunch after the ride with a bunch of roadies in the same, lighter
    > than most, sidi shoes. Not that I think that weight makes a difference, but they are comfortable,
    > long lasting, and you can walk on them. Light weight is free icing.

    I have a pair of Dominator 4's, but they aren't what I would call good all around shoes. The plastic
    sole is good in mud, but uselessly slick on harder surfaces when hike-a-biking (stinks for walking
    or climbing over rocks) or even walking around in town on certain surfaces like tile. I bought them
    because they are one of the lightest mountain shoes, but they are still heavy. My US 10.5
    equivalents are 14.5-14.6 oz each with cleats. Compare this to my trail running racing shoes at 8.7
    oz each or my trail running shoes at 11 oz each. Both of these have much better traction than the
    Sidis. I'm sure that someone could design something similar to my trail racing shoe, but with a
    moderately stiff plate (graduated so it is stiffest over the pedal and thinner elsewhere) and SPD
    cleat mounting in the 10 oz. range for my shoe size... that would be ideal for me. I don't believe
    sole stiffness helps with pedaling efficiency significantly - if it were up to me, the goal would be
    just to eliminate pressure points from the pedal, while making the rest of it as flexible as
    possible with good transition in stiffness. I'm a runner, and I don't see how using my foot as a
    lever wastes energy between my heels and the balls of my feet. I also don't understand how people
    could tolerate running in these things for cyclocross, though they get good reviews for it. I also
    think that the ratcheting strap is dumb - it is harder to get out of the shoe with one hand, sticks
    out and is more damage prone. The only reason I got it was that the velcro version only has two
    widely spaced straps, which left a gap and wrinkle on the tongue when I tried it out in the store.
    Plus, Potter is looking to avoid the racer look.
     
  9. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    >Can anyone give me a pointer to a bunch of decent all-round bike shoes?

    Consider Shimano sandals

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  10. Fred Roses

    Fred Roses Guest

    Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Can anyone give me a pointer to a bunch of decent all-round bike shoes?

    Specialized Sonoma? Here's their hype: All new shoe for 2003. Designed to be a comfortable, walkable
    shoe with enough serious cycling features for spinning or century riding. If you've compromised and
    bought mountain bike shoes in the past to get a comfortable shoe you can walk in, then this is the
    shoe you have been looking for.

    http://www.specialized.com/SBCEqProduct.jsp?section=12959&browselevel=shoes&JServSessionIdroot=vati-
    ssjhgc.j27001
     
  11. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Andrew Lee" <whatsupandrewathotmaildotcom> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I have a pair of Dominator 4's, but they aren't what I would call good all around shoes. The
    > plastic sole is good in mud, but uselessly slick on harder surfaces when hike-a-biking (stinks for
    > walking or climbing over rocks) or even walking around in town on certain surfaces like tile.

    I have the same shoes, and agree. I think they're not too great for MTB use, I bought them as an
    alternative to standard Sidi road shoes for weekly club & long distance riding. The shoes I like the
    best for casual riding is a the Diadora "Cayman", a low, sneaker-ish (like "skateboard" sneaks)
    shoe. My wife has a similar shoe in another brand. The soles aren't as stiff, which makes them
    better for walking, the soles are grippy, which makes them better for hike-a-bike, they don't look
    too much like bike shoes, which makes them better for errands/utility biking. Not a shoe for a
    century or beyond, or for really hard, fast, club rides, but other than that, great.
     
  12. Fred Roses

    Fred Roses Guest

    "Andrew Lee" <whatsupandrewathotmaildotcom> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > I have a pair of Dominator 4's, but they aren't what I would call good all around shoes.

    I use Dominators, and I agree, but the Mega-size Dominators are the only shoe I've found that
    doesn't pinch my little hammer toes. So, just to add to the mix in this thread, can anybody
    recommend a lighter, slightly more flexible, but still wider-than-normal shoe? The Specialized shoes
    that I mentioned in another post on this thread are great, but alas too narrow for me! Fred
     
  13. Jeff Starr

    Jeff Starr Guest

    Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote in message > Sonoma still looks terrible. Worse
    than a nurse's shoe. Some kind of modest accenting might help. <

    I just looked at the Sonoma, it's not a bad looking shoe. What are you looking for? Maybe a set of
    Dockers with cleats? Are you riding a bicycle or making a fashion statement? Have you considered
    having a set of shoes made? Maybe find something that appeals to your "fashion" sensibilities and
    take it to a cobbler shop. A good shoemaker, could probably put on a proper sole with the necessary
    hardware, to mount your cleats. Or just go to toe clips and you can wear whatever shoes match your
    "outfit". Well, good luck with your shoe hunt;-) Jeff

    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Sonoma still looks terrible. Worse than a nurse's shoe. Some kind of modest accenting might help.
    > I wonder what the sole is like. It should be properly stiff but not overly so. It looks
    > squishy-soft.
    >
    > As for the Shimano Sandals: yeah, I've heard they're great. I can see how they would be. I bet
    > they really help avoid hotfoot! I can see how they would rate A++ ...for a sandal. I hear that
    > Sheldon raves they're the best allround bike shoe. Technically perhaps and I might get some
    > sometime. But they look...as good as a sandal. A clunky, hightech sandal, at that.
    >
    > These things are close but not quite there.
    >
    > For racing, there are probably a DOZEN models in both road and MTB that are totally SPOT ON.
    >
    > Why does the most popular aspect of cycling (casual riding) only get *close*?
    >
    > (Cute, too, how they're selling a walkable tread for spinning more than for walking.)
    >
    > ---
    >
    > Jeff Potter
    > ****
    > *Out Your Backdoor * http://www.outyourbackdoor.com for modern folkways and culture revival...
    > ...offering "small world" views on bikes, bows, books, movies... ...new books featuring: XC ski
    > culture, a Gulf Coast thriller folding bicycles ... with radical novels coming up! ...original
    > downloadable music ... and articles galore! plus national "Off the Beaten Path" travel forums!
    > HOLY SMOKES!
     
  14. Jeff Potter

    Jeff Potter Guest

    [email protected] (Jeff Starr) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Jeff Potter <[email protected]> wrote in message > Sonoma still looks terrible. Worse
    > than a nurse's shoe. Some kind of modest accenting might help. <
    >
    > I just looked at the Sonoma, it's not a bad looking shoe. What are you looking for? Maybe a set of
    > Dockers with cleats? Are you riding a bicycle or making a fashion statement?

    As I said before, it only seems like 'moderate' riders would get as much shopping choice as
    racer-types, seeing as how there are 10X as many of them even in the enthusiast category. I'm not
    asking for anything special, just for the usual choices that a huge demographic gets. It's like how
    many kinds of race cars can an average person buy? How many average sedans? The selection usually
    goes where the population is. That's all.

    Anyway, I see that for 3 hours you can buy a set of oldstyle Pedali's at eBay. I have no relation.
    Compared to all the others these seem like the best allround 'moderate' road shoe:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3616502584&category=36126

    --JP
     
  15. "Jeff Potter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > As I said before, it only seems like 'moderate' riders would get as much shopping choice as
    > racer-types, seeing as how there are 10X as many of them even in the enthusiast category. I'm not
    > asking for anything special, just for the usual choices that a huge demographic gets. It's like
    > how many kinds of race cars can an average person buy? How many average sedans? The selection
    > usually goes where the population is. That's all.
    >
    I take your point, but I would argue that the 'moderate' riders you talk about already have a huge
    choice - they are called shoes. In countries like the Netherlands, Germany, India and China, where
    large numbers of bicycles are used for basic transport, people just wear the clothes and shoes that
    they would normally wear. In countries such as yours and mine (Australia), where cycling is largely
    a leisure or sporting activity, still only a minority of riders use bicycle specific shoes and the
    matching pedals, although these people probably account for a disproportionate amount of the
    distance ridden. In our countries, the number of people who tour (in the sense of journeys lasting
    more than one day) and use bicycle specific shoes is fairly small. So I think that manufacturers
    understand the demographics better than you suppose.

    I tour by bicycle and share your frustration with shoe choice, although I have the luxury of living
    in a city with an excellent specialist bicycle touring shop, which stocks a fair range. We dedicated
    tourers who ride in clip-in shoes are a pretty exclusive bunch! Unless we can persuade more people
    to join us we will have limited choices in shoes although, as others have pointed out, there are
    some good choices on the market.

    John Retchford
     
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