A good night riding and dodging.

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Steve Knight, Oct 29, 2003.

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  1. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    It was not so bad. Almost took put this old guy on a single speed. He had no lights or helmet going
    the wrong way in the dark. The road was one of those big round ones with a little park in the
    middle. I had just turned on the curve when I saw him. Hell I don't think he saw my 10w halogen or
    xenon flasher. Then almost home going on a straight away a pickup almost cut me off when he tried to
    cross the street. He stopped across the first lane after he saw me. Got to be blind to miss my
    lights they are very bright in your eyes. But I had seen him and I would not have crossed his path
    till I knew what he would do. Never trust drivers for sure. But so far I have had fewer problems at
    night then the day.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
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  2. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 30 Oct 2003 06:42:12 GMT, <[email protected]>, Steve Knight
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > But so far I have had fewer problems at night then the day.
    >
    Fewer cars. That's the difference. Same ratio are still incompetent asswipes.
    --
    zk
     
  3. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Steve Knight
    <[email protected]> writes:
    > It was not so bad. Almost took put this old guy on a single speed. He had no lights or helmet
    > going the wrong way in the dark. The road was one of those big round ones with a little park in
    > the middle. I had just turned on the curve when I saw him. Hell I don't think he saw my 10w
    > halogen or xenon flasher.

    If you were in Vancouver, I'd almost be sure you were in an area known as "The Crescent". I got
    turned around there yesterday in fact, trying to get across town. Lots of eyebrow-shaped streets
    that either guide one into a central park, or onto horribly uncyclable arterials, or turned back to
    where you started from. It's like trying to cross a black hole.

    > Then almost home going on a straight away a pickup almost cut me off when he tried to cross the
    > street. He stopped across the first lane after he saw me. Got to be blind to miss my lights
    > they are very bright in your eyes. But I had seen him and I would not have crossed his path
    > till I knew what he would do. Never trust drivers for sure. But so far I have had fewer
    > problems at night then the day.

    Yesterday I was on a minor street, stopped at a stop sign. A postal worker driving her little truck
    on her lane-lined through-street stopped for me. I didn't go, because I was stopped at a stop sign,
    and properly waiting for a break in the cross traffic. Then she started giving me hell, yelling:
    "You're not paying attention! I stopped for you!"

    She stopped when she should have just kept going like she was s'posed to, on her lane-striped
    arterial through-street.

    Meanwhile, since she stopped, all the other traffic that should have kept going stopped, too,
    wondering what all the hubbub was about. So I went, just to get the hell out of the spotlight. Even
    though I was wrongly given the ROW. After all, at that point, the whole world was wrongly yielding
    their ROW to li'l ol' me, who was just waiting at a stop line for a fair, honest break to cross the
    fuggin' intersection.

    She could have gone, and not held-up traffic. But instead, she decided to stop for me, and hold
    up traffic, and then yell at me while I was expecting her to do what she was supposed to do --
    keep going.

    And there am I, the guy on the bike everybody's looking at, to bear the blame for stopping traffic.

    <sarcasm> I guess it was my fault for being there, on a bike. <\sarcasm>

    Even when ya try to do right, there are passive-aggressives out there to screw up your moves. If
    you follow the letter of the law, they'll screw ya, and then complain about ya. If ya don't follow
    the letter of the law, they still complain about ya. Fug 'em all. And fug dabbing and truly
    stopping at 4-way stops unless ya really gotta. As far as I'm concerned, drivers who gripe about
    cyclists, can shove their complaints up their collective fuggin' ass. And pull it out, and shove it
    again. And again.

    I dunno why some drivers are so perineal, but they sure are, when they are.

    cheers, Tom

    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  4. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Tom Keats wrote:

    ><sarcasm> I guess it was my fault for being there, on a bike. <\sarcasm>
    >
    >Even when ya try to do right, there are passive-aggressives out there to screw up your moves. If
    >you follow the letter of the law, they'll screw ya, and then complain about ya. If ya don't follow
    >the letter of the law, they still complain about ya. Fug 'em all. And fug dabbing and truly
    >stopping at 4-way stops unless ya really gotta. As far as I'm concerned, drivers who gripe about
    >cyclists, can shove their complaints up their collective fuggin' ass. And pull it out, and shove it
    >again. And again.
    >
    >I dunno why some drivers are so perineal, but they sure are, when they are.
    >
    >
    >cheers, Tom
    >
    In the streets, bicycles are the smallest and most vulnerable. It brings behaviours out in drivers.
    Some are arrogant and insensitive to your survival, others are more like your postie. They both
    behave the way they do because they can play the superior posturing to the inferior. I definitely
    understand your frustration. Happens more in Vancouver than other cities in my experience. Hate it
    myself, out there riding in a vehicular manner and being treated like a pedestrian... Tom, don't let
    the (nice but dim) bastards grind you down! Bernie

    >
    >
    >-- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    >[point] bc [point] ca
     
  5. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Bernie <[email protected]> writes:

    > Tom, don't let the (nice but dim) bastards grind you down!

    Don't worry, I don't. But certain of 'em ain't neither nice nor dim -- they'll go to lengths to make
    "examples" of bicycle riders to other motorists. Those few, specific ones /are/ intentionally out to
    grind us down. Not by running us over, but by making like we're somehow "in the way", and impinging
    on them and everybody else with our mere presence. I hate it when ppl pretend I'm in the way.
    Especially when they get in my way to do so. That's why I avoid construction sites.

    The razmattazz where drivers give up their proper ROW, fearing the cyclist will behave
    unpredicatably, might sometimes be justified.

    But sometimes, I think they do it passive-aggressively. The only good way to deal with it is to rise
    above it and be impeccable, unhittable, good-natured, and irrepressible.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  6. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

    Ya need brighter lights :) Ive NEVER had anyone cut me off at night. ever. at all. 55 watt
    halogen :D

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 06:42:12 GMT, Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It was not so bad. Almost took put this old guy on a single speed. He had no lights or helmet
    > going the wrong way in the dark. The road was one of those big round ones with a little park in
    > the middle. I had just turned on the curve when I saw him. Hell I don't think he saw my 10w
    > halogen or xenon flasher. Then almost home going on a straight away a pickup almost cut me off
    > when he tried to cross the street. He stopped across the first lane after he saw me. Got to be
    > blind to miss my lights they are very bright in your eyes. But I had seen him and I would not have
    > crossed his path till I knew what he would do. Never trust drivers for sure. But so far I have had
    > fewer problems at night then the day.
     
  7. Arpit

    Arpit Guest

    On Wed, 29 Oct 2003 23:23:59 -0800, Zoot Katz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Thu, 30 Oct 2003 06:42:12 GMT, <[email protected]>, Steve Knight
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> But so far I have had fewer problems at night then the day.
    >>
    >Fewer cars. That's the difference. Same ratio are still incompetent asswipes.

    Actually, ive found a lot of asswipes are somewhat nocturnal, racing around in their ricemobiles
    with all their fog lights lit up :)
     
  8. Steve Knight <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Got to be blind to miss my lights they are very bright in your eyes.

    I ride at night a lot, a long commute home from work. About a year ago I put a red flasher on each
    side of my bike, hanging on my front panniers. Cars about to pull out from side streets or make a
    left turn in front of me seemed to see me a lot better. The 10w Halogen that you have (mine is a 15w
    halogen) probably has a tightly focused beam, good for lighting up the road in front of you but not
    so good for anyone slightly off to the side.

    Tom
     
  9. Matt O'Toole

    Matt O'Toole Guest

    "Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:p[email protected]...

    > But sometimes, I think they do it passive-aggressively. The only good way to deal with it is to
    > rise above it and be impeccable, unhittable, good-natured, and irrepressible.

    Always. Kill 'em with kindness, and defeat 'em with class.

    Matt O.
     
  10. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 22:00:40 +1100, Arpit <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ya need brighter lights :) Ive NEVER had anyone cut me off at night. ever. at all. 55 watt
    >halogen :D

    that was the first time. hell I could have had 20 lights on him and I bet he would not have seen.
    when I have the cash I will get a HID light. 15mph or more and I can't see well enough.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  11. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    >I ride at night a lot, a long commute home from work. About a year ago I put a red flasher on each
    >side of my bike, hanging on my front panniers. Cars about to pull out from side streets or make a
    >left turn in front of me seemed to see me a lot better. The 10w Halogen that you have (mine is a
    >15w halogen) probably has a tightly focused beam, good for lighting up the road in front of you but
    >not so good for anyone slightly off to the side.
    >

    I have tireflys on the wheels and my xenon flasher in back can be seen from the side. but you can't
    miss the xenon flasher in front it has fairly good side to side. I have not tested the halogen from
    the side. I should do that.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See
    http://www.knight-toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  12. Ajrbjr

    Ajrbjr Guest

    >She could have gone, and not held-up traffic. But instead, she decided to stop for me, and hold
    >up traffic,

    This usually works for me in this situation when I would rather they just go. I look down and fool
    with my computer or pretend I am gonna fool with something on my bike or get some water etc. I don't
    eyball them and they just figure I'm gonna stay there for a bit and they just take off.

    Andy
     
  13. >Always. Kill 'em with kindness, and defeat 'em with class.

    I sure wish I'd read that before this morning's commute.

    Now I'm not Politenessman by any stretch of the imagination, but I do have a well honed sense of
    self preservation. And I do obey the traffic laws, and I try my best to accommodate other road users
    when it doesn't compromise my own safety.

    So I'm lead vehicle in the center lane going into the traffic circle, stopped at the stop line at
    the red light. Perfectly set up, because to navigate the circle I need to be there. The light has
    about thirty seconds yet to run.

    Traffic is wall to wall, as usual. Some individual directly behind me decides to lay on his horn.
    Not a "hey, I'm behind you" toot, but a full-on blast ten feet back (an aside, are people ignorant
    enough to suppose that we don't know they're there, or what).

    So I just turned around slowly and stared at the vehicle, which turned out to be a big Mercedes SUV,
    not as big as a Lincoln Dominator or whatever, but big enough, and coldly Teutonic to boot, with
    tinted glass. Which action was meant to convey, to the very most insensitive, that I had taken
    notice of him.

    Now this particular traffic circle has very bad light timing, such that I have to hang off the
    bumper of the lead vehicle (the circle fills during the light cycle with cars from the other
    diagonal and from the feeder lanes from 16th Street, so being the lead vehicle in queue on my
    original street isn't really an advantage).

    So when the light changes I enter the circle at low speed, which almost immediately transitions to
    near-trackstand speed as I wait for the cars ahead to move forward when the next light hopefully
    changes. I've found this isn't a good place to put a foot down.

    Ths Mercedes person decides he wants my space, but, like, none of us are going anywhere at this
    point. Nevertheless, he actually pulls up next to me (and I'm in the center of the lane).

    And blows his horn again (another aside, how many people know how loud their car horn is when it's
    two feet away from someone who isn't in a car). Well, I've been having a rough month. At that point
    I didn't totally lose it, let's just say I experienced a failure of impulse control.

    To be exact I backhanded his window with my fist and showed him my middle finger, right against the
    glass (my last aside, what kind of an idiot drives with his windows rolled up on a really beautiful
    Fall morning).

    That definitely got his attention. Things got really complicated as the light changed and we both
    proceeded, him rolling his window down and me getting ready for my left merge so I could do the
    next turn.

    I distinctly remember him asking me if I wanted a fight, but not exactly politely, and I believe I
    asked him something about where he wanted his, ah, "nazi shitwagon" before the overriding need to
    get to work took charge.

    Along with reason. This was my worst encounter in years, and it was totally unexpected.

    I really believe that I could have handled this better, but how often do you get to practice? It
    definitely raised my blood pressure, and I'm afraid it spoiled my whole day.

    Now that I'm calmer about this incident, it occurs to me that maybe the belly crawling son of a
    bitch somehow believed that he had an absolute right to road dominance.

    Or that I didn't belong there. Which is strange, since he had DC plates. I would have been better
    prepared to expect that kind of shit from MD or VA or DP plates, but not from DC plates.

    Anyway, I feel better now that I've ranted.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  14. Kevan Smith

    Kevan Smith Guest

    On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 20:01:19 -0500, "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> from Realtime Limited wrote:

    > ... and I believe I asked him something about where he wanted his, ah, "nazi shitwagon" ....

    Woohoo! Nice verbiage. I'm proud of you.

    I am often tempted to take my steel U-lock and smash in the windows of hostile driver dorks. That's
    why I carry it zipped up in my backpack out of easy reach.

    --
    real e-mail addy: kevansmith23 at yahoo dot com a dirty sonar abruptly waves on a plastic
    surrealist.
     
  15. Eric S. Sande wrote:

    >>Always. Kill 'em with kindness, and defeat 'em with class.
    >
    >
    > I sure wish I'd read that before this morning's commute. ... Some individual directly behind me
    > decides to lay on his horn. ...
    >
    > So I just turned around slowly and stared at the vehicle... [etc.]

    One thing I've done a couple times, in vaguely similar situations, is to look at the driver,
    conspicuously look at the license plate, and conspicuously say the license plate number out loud
    several times.

    Actually, one of the times I had my wife do it as she stoked our tandem. Yes, it was an SUV
    (interestingly), and it was tailgating aggressively and sort of gunning its engine as we rode in a
    narrow lane. When she did the above, the guy who was driving dropped back nicely. He eventually
    passed with plenty of clearance, too.

    Fortunatly, such incidents are rare indeed. That tandem one was probably eight years ago.

    --
    Frank Krygowski
     
  16. Kevan Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I am often tempted to take my steel U-lock and smash in the windows of hostile driver dorks.
    : That's why I carry it zipped up in my backpack out of easy reach.

    if you wear khaki cut-offs and a belt or jeans you can slide the u-bolt down the back right of your
    shorts. it's a lot more comfortable than it sounds and gives you seriously quick access to your
    u-bolt in times of ... need. it doesn't take too much skill to pull out the u-bolt .. do whatever ..
    and slide it back into your pants without even slowing down.
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  17. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Tom Keats wrote:

    >The razmattazz where drivers give up their proper ROW, fearing the cyclist will behave
    >unpredicatably, might sometimes be justified.
    >
    >But sometimes, I think they do it passive-aggressively. The only good way to deal with it is to
    >rise above it and be impeccable, unhittable, good-natured, and irrepressible.
    >
    You've said it so well! Cheers and best regards, Bernie
     
  18. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Kevan Smith wrote:

    >On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 20:01:19 -0500, "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> from Realtime Limited wrote:
    >
    >>... and I believe I asked him something about where he wanted his, ah, "nazi shitwagon" ....
    >>
    >
    >Woohoo! Nice verbiage. I'm proud of you.
    >
    >I am often tempted to take my steel U-lock and smash in the windows of hostile driver dorks. That's
    >why I carry it zipped up in my backpack out of easy reach.
    >
    Precious moments like that make me fantasize about heavy automatic weapons loaded with incendiary
    bullets fired directly into the gas tank. But hey, it's only a fantasy!!! :)
     
  19. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    David Reuteler wrote:

    >Kevan Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    >: I am often tempted to take my steel U-lock and smash in the windows of hostile driver dorks.
    >: That's why I carry it zipped up in my backpack out of easy reach.
    >
    >if you wear khaki cut-offs and a belt or jeans you can slide the u-bolt down the back right of your
    >shorts. it's a lot more comfortable than it sounds and gives you seriously quick access to your
    >u-bolt in times of ... need. it doesn't take too much skill to pull out the u-bolt .. do whatever
    >.. and slide it back into your pants without even slowing down.
    >
    Damn those urban guerrillas!
     
  20. >Damn those urban guerrillas!

    Exactly. The tradeoff is excessive in terms of personal safety when riding outside the envelope in
    an urban situation, for sure.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
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